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Publication numberUS3255462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1966
Filing dateJun 22, 1964
Priority dateJun 22, 1964
Publication numberUS 3255462 A, US 3255462A, US-A-3255462, US3255462 A, US3255462A
InventorsAntonious Anthony J
Original AssigneeRae Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf glove
US 3255462 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1966 A. J. ANTONIOUS GOLF GLOVE 5 Shgets-Sheet 1 Filed June 22. 1964 ANTHONY J. ANTONIOUS INVENTOR June 14, 1966 A. J. ANTONIOUS 3,255,462

GOLF GLOVE Filed June 22. 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG- 1-' ANTHONY J. ANTONIOUS INVENTOR BY 11 61m M15 2% ax/(1 4 ATTORNEYS June 14, 1966 A. J. ANTONIOUS GOLF GLOVE v 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 22. 1964 F/G..Z3.

ANTHONY J. ANTONIOUS INVENT OR BY I 21W M 3 M ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,255,462 GOLF GLOVE Anthony J. Antonious, Baltimore, Md., assignor, by direct and mesne assignments, toRae (10., a partnership Filed June 22, 1964, Ser. No. 376,988 7 Claims. (Cl. 2l61) This application is a continuation-in-part of applicants prior application Serial Number 339,481, filed January 22, 1964, now abandoned.

This invention relates to improvements in golf gloves.

Golf gloves are commonly worn by golfers on that hand which grips the club uppermost, for example, the left hand of a right-handed golfer, to maintain a grip on the club handle, avoid calluses and blisters, and eliminate factors such as perspiration, skin texture, etc.

It is believed that one of the reasons that professional golfers get such good control and additional yardage on their shots is due to the muscles along the outside edge of the palms of their hands which, when the hands are curved to grip the club, firmly engage the top of the club handle. They accomplish this without squeezing or gripping too tightly as this will restrict the free hinge-like action of wrists desired at impact. It is an object of this invention to in fact provide the equivalent of such muscles by means of a unique control pad construction. Prior known golf gloves have had pads of various shapes and in various positions, but none which extend along the outer edge of the palm to reduce slippage, and promote a better feel and a better control.

It is not uncommon for a golfer to injure his lead or gloved hand when swinging a club with considerable force toward a ball and inadvertently hitting a tree stump, hidden stone, or other hard object. It is a further object of this invention to provide a golf glove encompassing an inherent safety feature. The shock of impact should a golfer hit a large stationary hard object in the act of striking the ball with the golf club is cushioned by a resilient control pad built into the glove.

By this means, painful injury to a golfers hand, arm or shoulder will be kept to a minimum if not completely avoided.

Another object of this invention is to provide a unique golf glove mitten which incorporates the best features of both gloves and mittens. This glove-mitten not only provides great-er safety for the hands and fingers but also better control of the various golf clubs. The glovemitten may be any number of various combinations of finger stall glove arrangements with mitten design incorporated therein which uses asingle stall for various and several fingers. With the arrangements disclosed herein for the glove-mitten combination, it is possible to obtain maximum performance of the hands and fingers for the various functions in the game of golf with increased safety and comfort.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a golf glove encompassing a sensory means to provide better control during the golf swing. This is accomplished by sensory means such as a peak, mound, ridge, or raised disc on the back of the thumb portion of the glove. The sensory means could also be a truncated mound with a concave surface forming a saddle or cradle for the thumb pad of the opposite hand when gripping a club with both hands. This mound or sensory peak permits a golfer to feel or sense any separation between the hands during the golf swing. To maintain a god grip, both hands 3,255,462 Patented June 14, 1966 must be held together, throughout the back swing, down I swing and follow-through. Such sensory means may be formed of materials to provide a moisture barrier or may be coated or impregnated to provide desired moisture barrier. This feature will minimize any slippage or separation of the two-hand grip, due to perspiration, when swinging a club purposefully. The position of the hands throughout the swing is the most critical component in the swing according to professional golfers. If the coupling or unitization of the two hands is weakened in any way, especially at impact, no matter how well the grip is otherwise, this results in loss of power and direction control at impact.

It is also known that for good golfing the proper hand position about an axis extending throught he club handle is essential. Although various golf gloves have been proposed in the past for aiding and assisting the correct grip of the golf club, these gloves have not come into general use. It is another object of this invention to provide indicating means to indicate the proper hand position relative to a club handle as viewed prior to starting a swing. Furthermore, the control pad and indicating means are correctly related in the glove.

A further object of this invention is to provide a golf glove including a non-slipping mesh or other material in the area where the two hands are in contact to prevent slippage between the golfers two hands during the golf swing.

An additional object of this invention is to provide a golf glove which will absorb the torque force in the hand at impact when the golf club meets the ball and to keep the torque at impact to a minimum if not eliminated completely.

It is also commonly known that one of the essential elements of a good golf grip is keeping the hands closely together and such is inherent in the interlocking and overlapping grips. It is a further object of this invention to provide an additional means for keeping the golfers hands together on the handle of a golf club throughout the swing by means of an elastic strap. The strap itself may be removed if not desired.

Another object of this invention is to provide a golf glove which is quite long-lasting due to the fact that the control pad on the palm of the glove takes up a considerable amount of wear which is otherwise applied to the conventional leather portion of a glove in this area.

An additional object of this invention is to provide a golf glove with a hidden pocket for holding change, ball markers, or the like.

A further object is to provide a golf glove which incorporates the foregoing advantages but is still comfortable. Present gloves become stiff and hard after use, but the resilient material used in the control pad and sensory peak can be made to perpetually maintain its resiliency and hence the pliability and softness of the glove.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be pointed out in the following description and claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, which discloses, by way of example, the principle of the invention and the best mode which has been contemplated of applying that principle.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial representation of the golf glove of this invention as worn on the left hand of a righthanded golfer gripping the handle of a golf club and showing an elastic guide band on the glove for keeping the golfers hands together.

FIG. 2 is a view of the left hand of a right-handed golfer as seen by the golfer illustrating means for indicating the correct position of the golfers hand after the club has been gripped relative to an axis extending to the golf club handle.

FIG. 3 is a view of the golf glove on a golfers left hand gripping the club and from the outside of the golfers hand showing the novel control gripping pad feature of this invention.

FIG. 4 is a view of the back of the glove.

FIG. 5 is a view of the palm of the glove.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a foam rubber or plastic control grip pad liner.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a foam rubber or plastic sensory peak liner.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the back of a glove incorporating certain of the glove-mitten features of this invention by providing mitten features for three fingers across the back for /3 the length of the fingers.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a further modification of the back of a glove-mitten according to this invention and showing a modification arrangement of the sensory peak.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the palm of another modification of the glove-mitten illustrating another arrangement of the control pad on the palm.

FIG. 11 is a further modification of the glove-mitten construction illustrating yet another modification of the control pad and glove-mitten length arrangement for the palm of the glove.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a further modification of a golf glove-mitten combination showing another modified palm construction for the control pad with a 2 finger glove-mitten palm airangernent.

FIG. 13 is a plan view of a pad to be used as a control pad with the golf glove of this invention.

FIG. 14 is a sectional view taken along line 1414 of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the back of a golf glove-mitten combination illustrating an arrangement for converting the glove to a glove-mitten combination and vice versa.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the back of a golf glove similar to the FIG. 15 embodiment and showing a modification of the control pad.

FIG. 17 is a detail view of a pair of fingers of the glove showing a large vent formed between the fingers in the glove-mitten combination.

Referring specifically to the drawings, the golf glove 10 of this invention is illustrated for the left hand of a right-handed golfer. The glove includes the usual palm 12 and back 14 together with finger sheaths or stalls 16 for the four fingers and a separate additional thumb sheath or stall 18. For certain features of this invention it is not necessary that the finger sheaths be fully extended or in the form illustrated. For example, the glove may only have finger openings and not finger stalls. For the grip pad feature it is not necessary that the glove include a thumb stall.

The glove also has a wrist portion 20 which may have an elastic band 22 for gathering the wrist portion about the wrist and snap fasteners 24 and 26 for snapping the wrist portion together as is common in the glove art. Obviously, other known glove wrist arrangements could be used. The glove thus far described is one which is generally commercially available and to which the improvements of this invention have been applied.

This invention contemplates resilient control gripping pad means such as pad 30 onthe palm of the glove extending generally along the palm parallel to the outside edge thereof and in line with the little finger from a point at the heel of the hand to a point just below or adjacent the base of the little finger. This pad 30 includes a foam liner 31 shown in FIG. 6 and a covering 32 stitched over the liner. The liner may also have a moisture barrier 33 on the lower side thereof for keeping perspiration from the hand from getting into the foam rubber and possibly causing slippage. The pad 30 has a heel portion 34 which is generally raised as shown in FIG. 6 and then dropped off as the pad extends toward the fingers along the outer edge of the palm. The control pad has a plurality of transverse V-shaped valleys 36 to enable the pad to present a generally continuous curved surface when it is bent at the time the club is gripped. The outer end 38 of the pad 30 stops sufficiently below the base to permit the flesh below the little finger to fit into a concave end 38 of the pressure pad'to assure more positive gripping action in this area. That is, the fleshy part of the hand below the little finger locks in concave end 38 and .allows the little finger to exercise command over the grip. The pad is also sloped backwards slightly on this end to accommodat this flesh.

In use of the'glove with the control pad 30 a golfer grips the club handle and the pad 39 provides in effect additional muscle at the outer edge-of the palm and thus allows a firm gripping of the handle at this outer edge of the palm, to promote better feel and full hand control. Because of the concave end 38 the muscles of the fingers are related to the pad and to the positive gripping action. It has been found by experimentation thatthis pad is quite successful for its intended purpose of providing additional yardage on golf shots with better control.

The gripping pad 30 also contributes other unobvious and unusual advantages and features to golf gloves. For example, it provides a safety feature so that the shock of impact is minimized should a golfer inadvertently hit a tree stump, stone, or the like. Also, the torque at impact on striking the ball is absorbed. Further, this pad takes wear which is ordinarily applied to this portion of the glove and therefore the glove lasts considerably longer.

In addition to gripping pad 39, the golf glove of this invention further relates the position of the golfers hands to the clubs by virtue of a plurality of indicating means such as diamond pips 4t) and 42, FIG. 4. These pips 40 and 4 2 may be colored beads attached to the glove directly above the knuckles. As the hand is bent into a gripping fist, the knuckles will cause the beads to protrude making them easier to view. Separate heads will be much easier to see than colored glove material which becomes discolored or darkened, losing their color contrast effectiveness after use when sweating. Obviously, other indicator means such as ridges over the knuckles could be used. These pips are arranged over a golfers knuckles such that when the golfers hand grips the club as shown in FIG. 2 at least one pip 42 should be visible but less than all of the pips. That is, pip 40* would not be visible. If pip 40 were visible then the hand would be rotated too far around to the right of the club in the FIG. 2 position possibly causing hooking, and vice versa, causing a slice if too far to the left on the club.

The thumb of the golf glove is lined around the outside with a non-slipping mesh or other non-slipping or roughened fabric 43 sewn to the leather under-portion of the glove along seam 45. As can be seen in FIG. 1 when the non-gloved hand overlies the thumb portion of the glove hand the non-slipping fabric is positioned between the two hands where most of the slippage takes place during the golf swing. Also, most slippage takes place in the hot weather when the hands perspire freely soaking the golf glove. This mesh 43 will also act as a moisture absorber and evaporator and if desired may include a moisture barrier which will keep this part of the hands next to the club grip drier than that obtainable by the use of the presently known golf gloves. If desired, the inside of the fingers and thumb area may also be covered with non-slipping means, such as roughened surfaces or non-slipping material, to eliminate Slipping of the club especially on impact. Although the non-slipping mesh or other non-slipping material has been illustrated as sewn to the glove it could of course be adhered by other means and the mesh could be other non-slipping material, for example roughened leather.

It is known and taught by professional golfers that to obtain a good golf grip the hands must be held together as a unit. One test of a good grip is to place a coin between the hands at the back base of the underlying thumb and this coin should be held securely in place throughout the swing. The present golf glove includes a sensory means over the back base of the thumb of the glove which sensory means is sensed by the palm below the base of the thumb of the other hand and pressed against throughout the complete swing to hold the hands together as a unit throughout the swing. The sensory means may be a peak, ridge, depression, disc, square, oval or any desired shape but is illustrated by reference numeral 47 (FIGS. 2, 4, 7) as including a sloped ridge 49,

extending from or along the back of the gloves thumb stall. A disc 51 adjoins ridge 49 and is positioned over the fleshy area on the back of the hand between the base of the thumb and base of the index finger. The ridge 49 could also curve if desired.

There is further provided at the wearers option a means for holding the golfers hands together throughout the swing as illustrated in FIG. 1, this means including an elastic band 44 which is selectively detachable. 'The band includes a snap attachment 46 on one end and a hook 48 on the other end. The hook is placed around one end and the snap attachment is snapped around an attachment strap 50 secured to the thumb stall 18. A guide 52 is provided for the strap. When not in use the strap may be neatly covered by a covering flap 54 held down by a snap fastener 56. In use of the strap 44 a golfer puts the thumb of his right hand through the strap after the left hand has gripped the club and then starts the swing with the hands in the position as shown in FIG. 1. This strap is of primary use to novices and amateur golfers, and may be eliminated in some forms of the invention.

The glove can also accommodate small change, ball markers and the like by means of a pocket 58 formed by two thicknesses of material on the back of the glove and closed by a fiap 60 having a snap fastener 62.

Referring to FIG. 8, there is shown a golf glove-mitten ombination incorporating certain unique features of this invention. The top portion of the back of the glove as shown in FIG. it is similar to that of the FIG. 4 embodiment including the elastic band 22, pocket58, and correct grip indicating pips 40 and 42. However, the individual finger stalls 16 for the middle, ring and little fingers are covered to about /3 length by an extension 70 of the back of the glove thereby forming a glovemitten combination. It is to be emphasized that the length of the covering 70 may be varied and the number of fingers covered may also be varied according to the particular desires of the user of the glove.

1 In addition, the sensory peak on the back of the thumb takes another form as shown at 72. In this form of sensory peak there is provision for overlapping the thumb by the other hand and correctly positioning the overlapping hand. The sensorypeak need not actually be a peak, but, as shown, may go completely across the back of the thumb and partially wrap therearound.

Another modification is shown in FIG. 9. In this modification, the sensory peak on the back of the thumb is in two separate raised portions 74 and 76. The function is still the same, however; namely, to allow sensing of the overlapping in the golfers grip. Also, as shown in FIG. 9 a mitten extension 78 for the back of the glove only includes the ring and little fingers and extends about /3 of the way out on these fingers. A different venting pattern formed by vent holes 80 is provided in the FIG. 9 embodiment as compared to the slit venting r 6 arrangement provided by slits 82 in the backof the FIG. 8 embodiment.

A further modification showing the palm of the glove is illustrated in FIG. 10. In this glove-mitten combination a palm portion of the glove 84 extends downwardly like a mitten to about length of 'the finger stalls 16 to hold the finger stalls for the little, ring, and middle fingers together in mitten form. The control pad is now illustrated generally at 86 and includes two portions, 88 and 90 with raised components 92, 93, 94, 95, 96 thereon and extending upwardly from a base to also provide the same function and features as that for the control pad 30 illustrated in the FIGS. 1-6 embodiments. The FIG. 10 embodiment illustrates, however, that the control pad need not be a single raised extension, but may be composed of a combination of fiat elevated and depressed surfaces engineered to meet the highest requirements of safety and control and may be provided on separated base sections in combination with the various designs of elevations.

Also in FIG. 10 is illustrated an attaching arrangement including a wrist strap 100 having a gripping surface 102 on the underside thereof cooperating with the mating gripping surface 104 on the glove. The arrangement in its sealed condition is shown in FIG. 11.

FIG. 11 also shows a palm extension 106 for the mitten type glove which extends only about /3 of the way along the fingers.

In addition, in FIG. 11 there is shown a further arrangement of the control pad provided by a plurality of flat elevated members 107 extending generally longitudinally from the heel of the palm toward the base of the little finger. These individual members 107 are in three longitudinally extending rows and the outer rows of members are higher than the ones in the center. That is, the rows 108, 109 at the ends near the wrist and little finger respectively are elevated to a height higher than the rows 110 therebetween.

FIG. 12 is a further showing of another modification of the control pad on the palm of a mitten type glove in which a mitten extension 112 extends about /a the way along finger stalls 16 for the little and ring fingers of a right-handed golfers left hand. A control pad indicated generally at 114 is comprised of a base portion and a plurality of rings or collars, 116, 117, 118, etc., of varying heights, sizes and shapes. These rings may be of different shapes and the holes may be in a pattern or at random. This provides a unique suction gripping actionl FIG. 13 is an illustration of a control pad. The pad may be formed or molded from foam or sponge rubber or other resilient materials such as felt, cloth, leather, foam plastic, etc. as shown in .FIG. l4 and may comprise a plurality of raised portions 120, 122 separated by depressed lines 124 arranged in various patterns and sizes to produce the desired effects as illustrated in FIG. 13 and described above. 0

FIG. 15 is a further showing of a golf glove in accordance with this invention in which the sensory peak arrangement 126 includes a plurality of separate peaks 128, 129, etc. again for the purpose as described above. The glove attaching arrangement for the back is the same as for the palm as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11.

FIG. 16 shows a further arrangement in which the sensory means 130 is a saddle or cradle and includes curved ends 132 and 134 and a divided or one-piece base 136 effectively providing a saddle or cradle for the overlapping right hand. This tends to unitize the hands into a strongly coupled two-hand grip, and is especially important on the backswing. Slippage between the hands will be reduced to a minium if not eliminated.

The mitten features of the glove shown in FIG. 15 include a pair of flaps 138, 140 securable to the ring finger and middle finger stalls. The ends of these flaps may have sticking or gripping means similar to that shown at 102, 104 on the under surface for cooperating with a sticking or gripping surface 144 on the finger stall 16 for the middle finger and similar sticking or gripping means 146 for selectively securing the flap 140 to the little finger. The flaps 138 and 140 may be adhered to their respective finger stalls when the fingers are close together to provide a mitten effect or they may be adhered to allow the fingers freedom of lateral movement as in a finger type glove. When the flaps are thus released the fingers can operate separately while when the flaps are adhered the glove is converted to a mitten. This provides for a full mitten arrangement.

Thus, the FIGS. 15-16 embodiments show the arrangement wherein the glove may be converted to a mitten, or if desired in FIG. 15 the glove may be permanently sewn at a mitten by the extension on the back or palm of the finger stalls or on both sides.

Referring now to FIG. 17, there is shown finger stalls 16, and a mitten extension 148. The mitten extension has slit vents 150 and the fingers have vent holes 15 2. Further venting is provided in the slit 154 between the finger stalls to provide adequate air cooling for the fingers. It is apparent from the teachings herein that various other combinations of air vents may be provided with various different sizes of slits, etc.

As can be seen the glove-mitten combination can be any part of a mitten lengthwise up to the outer joint of the fingers and for either the front or back of the palm for any combination of the little finger and adjacent finger or fingers. This enables the base portion fingers to act together rather than separately and strengthens this portion of the hand in the grip. The tips of the fingers are free and this allows proper closing of the hand and positioning of the fingers for a correct club grip.

It may be seen that this invention contemplates a golf glove with a number of separate but interrelated features for the purpose of providing not only safety and protection to a golfers hands but also improving a golfers grip and swing. Furthermore, the glove will wear considerably longer due to the features disclosed. Although a number of individual features are disclosed, certain of these features may be eliminated within the spirit of the invention as defined in the claims.

While there have been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel features of the invention as applied to the preferred embodiment, it will be understood that various omissions and substitutions and changes in the form and details of the golf glove illustrated may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of this invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A golf glove comprising; a palm portion, a back portion, glove stalls for at least four fingers, and a control and gripping pad means extending longitudinally generally parallel to an outer edge of the palm portion in general alignment with the little finger stall of the glove and extending from substantially the bottom of the palm portion of the glove to a point adjacent the base of the little finger stall so that the gripping pad means may be extended around a considerable portion of a clubs surface adjacent the outer edge of the glove palm, the gripping pad means including spaced pad components to enable the gripping pad means to cradle a club handle 1 3. A golf glove comprising a palm portion, a backportion, stalls for a golfers fingers and thumb extending from the palmand back portions, and only to separate indicator beadlike pips unaffected by moisture protruding from and attached to the back of the glove and positioned so that one indicator pip is on the back portion of the glove immediately below the base of the little finger stall and the other indicator pip is on the back of the glove immediately below the base of the third finger stall such that when a golf club is correctly gripped by a golfer wearing the glove one but not both of the indicator pips will be visible.

4. A golf glove comprising a palm portion, a back portion, finger stalls for four fingers and a thumb, a pad extending longitudinally along an outer edge and on the outer surface of the palm portion in general alignment with the finger stall for the little finger, the pad being of such a length to enable it to encircle a substantial portion of the periphery of the club handle when it is gripped by a wearer of the glove, and a plurality of separate beadlike indicators attached to the back of the glove in the area immediately below the base of the finger stalls and related to the gripping pad such that when the golf club is correctly gripped some but not all of-the indicators will be visible.

5. A golf glove as defined in claim 4 further comprising a sensory means in the glove extending outwardly from the surface of the back portion of the thumb stall adjacent the base .of the thumb stall.

6. A golf glove comprising a palm portion, a back portion, finger stalls extending from the palm portion for at least four fingers and a thumb, a gripping pad extending longitudinally along an outer edge of the palm portion in general alignment with the little finger stall and extending from substantially the base of the palm portion to a point below the little finger stall so that the pad may be extended around a considerable portion of a clubs surface adjacent the outer edge of the palm portion, the pad including spaced transverse valleys extending across the pad, the pad being higher at the heel than at the center thereof and having the end of the pad adjacent the little finger stall concave, non-slipping material covering the area of the thumb stall, a sensory means including a ridge protruding from the back of the thumb; stall and a disc adjacent the base of the thumb stall, and a plurality of separate beadlike indicators on the back of the glove immediately below the base of the finger stalls positioned such that when a golf club is correctly gripped by a golfer wearing the glove some but not all of the indicators will be visible.

7. A golf glove comprising; a palm portion, a back portion, separate finger stalls extending from the palm and back portion, material flexibly connecting the little finger stall to at least the adjacent finger stall to provide a glove-mitten combination, the material extending outwardly from the base of the finger stalls to a point which is less than one-half the distance to the end tip of the finger stalls, and resilient control and gripping pad means protruding from the palm portion and extending parallel to the outside edge of the palm portion from a point above the base of the palm portion to a point immediately below the base of the little finger stall, the pad means including spaced pad components shaped to allow the pad to encircle a golf club when a golfer Wearing the glove grips the club.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 889,397 6/1908 OShaughnessy 2-159 1,113,870 10/1914 Billings 2158 1,286,771 12/1918 Raymond 2-158 1,513,237 10/1924 Green 2-459 X 1,612,822 1/1927 Jones 2161 1,627,382 5/1927 Golomb 216 X 1,982,431 11/1934 Hines 2l60 2,692,574 9/1937 Eddy 2159 X (Other references on following page) 9 UNITED STATES PATENTS Nunn 2159 Causse 2-159 Waller 2-165 Romeo 2161 Ogg 2-161 Canausa 2-161 Christopher I 2-161 10 FOREIGN PATENTS 486,226 9/1952 Canada. 787,230 12/ 1957 Great Britain. 814,719 6/1959 Great Britain. 958,891 5/ 1964 Great Britain.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

GEORGE V. LARK IN, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification2/161.3, D29/117.1, 473/205
International ClassificationA63B71/08, A63B71/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B71/146
European ClassificationA63B71/14G6