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Publication numberUS3255615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1966
Filing dateFeb 27, 1963
Priority dateFeb 27, 1963
Publication numberUS 3255615 A, US 3255615A, US-A-3255615, US3255615 A, US3255615A
InventorsAlvin Schwartz
Original AssigneeAlvin Schwartz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Warp knit fabric with looped yarn surface
US 3255615 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1966 A. SCHWARTZ WARP KNIT FABRIC WITH LOOPED YARN summon Filed Feb. 27, 1965 FIG.3

FIG.2

INVENTOR. 5 ALVIN SCHWARTZ BY 3 g ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,255,615 WARP KNIT FABRIC WITH LOOPED YARN SURFACE Alvin Schwartz, 505 E. 79th St., New York, N.Y. Filed Feb. 27, 1963, Ser. No. 261,353 6 Claims. (Cl. 66-194) This invention relates to warp knitted pile fabrics. Although the fabrics of the present invention may be used for various purposes, it is especially well adapted for blouses, dresses and other'articles of wearing apparel, especially as a light weight fabric of pleasing appearance.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a warp knitted pile fabric with the pile loops knitted in with the stitches of the ground fabric and with the ground fabric solidly knit, i.e., the stitches of the ground fabric being knit on each needle in every course.

Another object of the present invention is to produce a warp knitted pile fabric wherein the pile forming threads are interknit in certain courses with the threads which form the ground of the fabric and with threads which are also interknit on the face of the fabric with threads of the ground fabric in certain courses.

Another object is to provide a warp knit pile fabric in which the pile loops differ slightly in length in a moreor-less haphazard fashion resulting in a fabric having a pleasing appearance.

The above and other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be more fully understood from the following description of a presently preferred embodiment of the invention, considered in connection with the accompanying illustrative drawings.

- In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic illustration of the fabric showing its construction and the manner in which the knitting is performed;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of part of a warp knitting machine for knitting the fabric; and

FIG. 3 is a detail view showing a portion of the side of one of the yarn guides of the middle yarn guide bar of the warp knitting machine,

Referring now to the drawings in detail and first tov FIG. 2, the warp knitting machine is of conventional construction but is operated in the manner hereinafter described for producing the fabric illustrated by FIG. 1.

More particularly, as here shown, the warp knitting machine comprises the front yarn guide bar 10, a middle yarn guide bar 12 and a back yarn guide bar 14. Each of said guide bars carries as many yarn guides 16, 18 and 20, respectively, as there are needles, although for simplicity of illustration only one yarn guide is shown on each of the three yarn guide bars. A few ofthe needles, all of which are spring-beard needles are indicated at 22, and only some of the sinkers are shown,

as indicated at 24. The needle presser bar is indicated at 26.

The yarn Y1 is supplied from a warp beam (not shown) to the yarn guide elements 20 of the back bar 14 for knitting the ground fabric indicated by the full lines YG in FIG. l, said yarn Y1 being supplied under regulated tension by the conventional tension bar 28 of the warp knitting machine. The yarn for forming the pile loops is indicated at Y2 in FIG. 2 and is supplied from a warp beam (not shown) to the yarn guides under slight tension over the tension bar 30, the pile loop yarn in the fabric being shown in FIG. 1 in dot and dash lines designated YP. The yarn designated Y3 is supplied from a warp beam (not shown) to the guides of the front guide bar 10 over the tension bar 32 and is indicated by the dotted lines YF in FIG. 1.

As previously indicated, the ground fabric has a stitch formed on each needle (or in each wale) in every course. The yarn YP for forming the pile loops has a stitch on each needle (or in each wale) but only in certain courses, preferably alternate courses as in the preferred illustrative embodiment of the invention shown by FIG. 1. The yarn YF at the -face of the fabric also has stitches on each needle (or in each wale') but in alternate courses which are preferably the same as the courses in which the pile stitches are formed.

It will be understood that the warp knitting machine is operated in a conventional way except that the yarn Y2 for forming the pile loops is fed to the needles under low tension, and it will be further understood that the yarn guide bars 10, 12 and 14 are oscillated to move the yarn guides carried thereby back and forth in the spaces between the needles and that patterning wheels are em ployed for moving said yarn guide bars predetermined distance lengthwise of the row of needles.

In FIG. 1, only a few of the needles 22 are shown and the spaces between adjacent needles of the shown needles are indicated in FIG. 1 by the numerals 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. The pattern wheels for the yarn guide bars 10; 12 and 14 are set up according to the following pattern wherein the numerals designate the spaces between the needles:

Pattern of back yarn guide bar 14:

l,02,12',3l,2then repeat.

Pattern of middle yarn guide bar 12:

2,35,5-3,2-0,0then repeat.

Pattern of forward yarn guide bar 10:

2,32,2-1,0-1,1- then repeat.

, It will be noted that the ground fabric knit from the yarn YG has a stitch formed on each needle in every course as previously stated but said fabric is not an ordinary warp knit jersey fabric. This is evident from the above indicated pattern of the back guide bar 14 in comparison with the ordinary pattern, namely, 1,0-1,2 and repeat, of the usual jersey knit fabric. According to the pattern for the middle bar 12 for forming the pile loops one of which is indicated at Y? in FIG. 1 as extending from point YP1 to point YPZ, the yarn guide bar 12 is moved lengthwise of the row of needles a distance of five spaces first to the right and then the same number of spaces to the left to form a loop of the desired length. An adjacent pile loop extends from point YP2 to point YP3. It will be noted that the stitches of the pile loops are open stitches as indicated in FIG. 1, i.e., the yarn for the pile loops YP is not Wound completely around the needle but is fed below the beard and across the back of the needle on which the stitch is to be formed. On the other hand, the yarn YF which is knit in alternate courses together withthe stitches of the ground fabric and the stitches of yarn YP for the pile loops is Wound completely around the needle on which the stitch of said yarn YF is to be formed, according to the above indicated pattern of the forward guide bar 10, and the knitting pattern is such that the yarn YF traverses the yarn YP in the loop forming portion thereof so that the friction due to said engagement of the yarns YF and YP prevent more than a slight recessive shortening of the loop by the tension of the tension bar 30 when the yarn guide bar 10 is removed from its limit of travel in one direction in an opposite direction. It will be understood that the low tension of bar 30 on yarn Y2 is regulated so that it is not substantially greater than is necessary for the stitch forming operation on said yarn to form the knit-in pile loops. The effect of the engagement of the yarn YF with the yarn for the pile loops to prevent said receding movement of the yarn of the pile loop is augmented due to the fact that the yarn of the pile loop is directed laterally against the face 16F of the yarn guide 16 adjacent the yarn guide opening 16e as illustrated more-or-less diagrammatically in FIG. 3 so that the tension of the tension bar 30 on yarn Y2 which might otherwise withdraw yarn from the loop is almost entirely, if not wholly, neutralized. These effects of the yarn YF on the loops of the pile yarn during the knitting operation need not necessarily be uniform and advantage may be taken of the fact, since the non uniformity results in the pile loops varying somewhat in length and thereby enhancing the pleasing appearance of the face of the fabric.

The following is one example of yarns employed for producing a fabric of desirable characteristics. Each of the three yarns is in filament form, the yarn Y1 for the ground fabric being, for example, 40 denier nylon filament yarn, the yarn Y2 for the pile loops being, for example, 100 denier triacetate filament yarn, and the yarn Y3 for the yarn YF of the fabric being, for example, denier nylon filament yarn. It will be understood, however, that while the yarns just specified in the indicated deniers are preferred and provide a highly pleasing fabric, other yarns in various deniers, respectively, may be used depending upon the desired characteristic of the wanted fabric.

Also, it will be understood that the pile forming yarn may be knit on spaced needles in alternate courses or in otherwise spaced courses and for certain fabrics need not be knit on every needle in the course. Similarly, it will be understood that the yarn Y3 may be knit on the same needles as the pile forming yarn and like the latter, need not be knit on each needle in the course. Further, it will be understood that the yarn-guide bar 12 may be moved lengthwise of the row of needles any suitable distance other than five spaces, depending upon the size of the desired pile loop.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied otherwise than as herein specifically illustrated or described, and that certain changes in the form and arrangement of parts and in the specific manner of practicing the invention may be made without departing from the underlying idea or principles of this invention within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A warp knitted pile fabric, comprising warp knit yarns knit in every wale in each course and thereby forming a solid warp knit ground fabric, pile forming warp yarns interknit with said yarn of the ground fabric in every wale in spaced courses only providing a pile on said solid warp knit ground fabric, and other yarns interknit with said ground fabric and with said pile forming yarn' in every wale in spaced courses and lying on the front of said ground fabric at the base of said pile.

2. A warp knitted pile fabric, comprising warp knit yarns knit in every Wale in each course and thereby s forming a solid warp knit ground fabric, said yarns being knit according to the following pattern, namely, 1,0- 2,12,3-1,2-and repeat; pile forming warp yarns interknit with said yarn of the ground fabric in every wale in spaced courses only providing a pile on said solid warp knit ground fabric, and other yarns interknit with said ground fabric and with said pile forming yarn in said spaced courses and lying on the front of said ground fabric at the base of said pile.

3. A warp knitted pile fabric, comprising warp knit yarns knit in every wale in each course and thereby forming a solid warp knit ground fabric, and pile forming warp yarns interknit with said yarn of ground fabric in wales in spaced courses only for providing a pile on said solid warp knit ground fabric, and other yarn interknit with said ground fabric and also with said pile forming yarn in said spaced courses.

4. A warped knitted pile fabric, comprising warp knit yarns knit in every wale in each course and thereby forming a solid warp knit ground fabric, and pile forming warp yarns interknit with said yarn of the ground fabric in spaced courses only and in spaced wales in said spaced courses, and other yarn interknit with said ground fabric and also with said pile forming yarn in said spaced courses.

5. A warp knitted pile fabric, comprising warp knit yarns knit in every wale in each course and thereby forming a solid warp knit ground fabric, and pile forming warp yarns interknit with said yarn of the ground fabric in alternate wales in spaced courses only for providing a pile on said solid warp knit ground fabric, and other yarn interknit with said ground fabric and also with said pile forming yarn in said spaced courses.

' 6. A warp knitted pile fabric, comprising warp knit yarns knit in every wale in each course and thereby forming a solid warp knit ground fabric, and pile forming warp yarns interknit with said yarn of the ground fabric in spaced courses only and wales spaced from each other in said spaced courses by at least one interleaving wale, and other yarn interknit with said ground fabric and also with said pile forming yarn in said spaced courses.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,019,258 10/1935 Holmes 66-194 2,267,578 12/ 1941 Schonfeld 6686 2,379,852 7/1945 Ne'bel 66l94 3,063,272 11/1962 Bolton 6686 3,109,302 11/1963 Vitek 66193 3,111,829 11/1963 Artzt 66194 DONALD W. PARKER, Primary Examiner.

RUSSELL C. MADER, ROBERT R. MACKEY,

Examiners.

R. FELDBAUM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2019258 *Aug 16, 1933Oct 29, 1935Celanese CorpWarp knit fabric
US2267578 *Oct 9, 1940Dec 23, 1941 Production of warp fabric
US2379852 *May 9, 1939Jul 3, 1945Max NebelProduction of loop-plush fabric
US3063272 *Feb 7, 1958Nov 13, 1962A W Swann And Company LtdMethods of producing warp knitted fabrics
US3109302 *Apr 29, 1959Nov 5, 1963Besmer Teppichfabrik G M B H FMethod and means for producing carpets and products derived therefrom
US3111829 *Mar 22, 1960Nov 26, 1963Artzt William WalterKnitted pile fabric
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3413825 *Jun 30, 1967Dec 3, 1968Celanese CorpMetering warp knit fabrics
US3434306 *Nov 5, 1964Mar 25, 1969Celanese CorpWarp knit terry fabrics
US3845640 *Sep 4, 1973Nov 5, 1974Waller NMethod and apparatus for producing a knitted fabric with projecting barbs
US3845641 *Jul 1, 1971Nov 5, 1974Binder Fa GMethod and apparatus for producing a knitted fabric with projecting barbs
US3861175 *Jun 11, 1973Jan 21, 1975Du PontProcess for knitting two-bar fabrics from three warp thread sets
US4015451 *Oct 8, 1975Apr 5, 1977E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyWarp knit fabric
US4026130 *Oct 8, 1975May 31, 1977E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyMethod of warp knitting
US4838044 *Mar 22, 1988Jun 13, 1989Yoshida Kogyo K. K.Warp-knit tape for hook-and-loop fasteners
US6540773Jul 3, 2001Apr 1, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Low profile, high stretch knit prosthetic device
US6893457Jan 15, 2003May 17, 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Low profile, high stretch knit prosthetic device
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/194, 66/195
International ClassificationD04B23/00, D04B23/08
Cooperative ClassificationD04B23/08
European ClassificationD04B23/08