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Publication numberUS3255681 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1966
Filing dateOct 9, 1962
Priority dateOct 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3255681 A, US 3255681A, US-A-3255681, US3255681 A, US3255681A
InventorsBrugler Richard K, Heltzel Carl J
Original AssigneeHeltzel Steel Form & Iron Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic concrete spreader
US 3255681 A
Abstract  available in
Images(11)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1966 J. HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMATI C CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 11 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIGJ.

INVENTORS rl J. Heltzel a Richard K. Brugler June 14, 1966 c. J. HELTZEL E 3,255,681

AUTOMATIC CONCRETE SPREADER l1 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 9, 1962 TTORNEYS June 114, 1966 c, J HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMATI C CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 ll Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS Carl J. Heltzel a Richard K. Brugler June 14, 1966 c. J. HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMATIC CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 ll Sheets-Sheet 4.

U Ling; w w i w w 77 I "1 w M; n \h 8- Carl J. Heltzela Richard K. Brugler June 14, 1966 c, J, HELTZEL ETAL 3,255,681

AUTOMATI C CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 ll Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG.8. 77

INVENTORS Carl J.Heltze| 8 Richard K. Brugler June 14, 1966 c. J. HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMA'II C CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 11 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIGJO. FIGJI.

INVENTORS Carl J. Heltzela Richard K. Brugler ATTORNEYS June 14, 1966 c, HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMATIC CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 ll Sheets-Sheet 8 1 5V T A22 I l INVENTORS Carl J. Helrzel 8 Richard K. Brugler SV l A l POWER ON CARRIAGE MOVING C LT L5 5 HANDLE FOR 0 PADDLE SWITCH 4 RT LS CARRI GE C;

lOb

lOo

FIG.I7.

BY w 0 M MW CARRIAGE STOP June 14, 1966 c. J. HELTZEL ETAL 3,255,681

AUTOMATIC CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 11 Sheets-Sheet 9 CARRIAGE Q Q Q l2 ll [3 F|G.l8.

CARRIAGE MOVING CARRIAGE STOP POWER INVENTORS Carl J. Hehzel 8 BY Richard K. Brugler @W M 3km 'ITORNEYS June 14, 1966 c, HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMATI C CONCRETE SPREADER Filed Oct. 9, 1962 11 Sheets-Sheet 1O FILTER I23 Carl J. Heltzel 8 By Richard K. Brugler JDMWMMH 3 2M ATTORNEYS June 14, 1966 c. J. HELTZEL ET AL 3,255,681

AUTOMATIC CONCRETE SPREADER l1 Sheets-Sheet 11 Filed Oct. 9, 1962 ONN Nb K 4? J? i, T m n J |1H H hllllm INVENTORS Carl J. Heltzel 8 BY Richard K.B1'ugler m m United States Patent 3,255,681 AUTOMATIC CQNCRETE SPREADER Carl J. Heltzel and Richard K. lirugler, Warren, Ohio, assignors to The Heltzel Steel Form 3: Iron (10., Warren, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed Oct. 9, 1962, Ser. No. 229,343 16 Claims. (Cl. 94-44) The present invention relates to automatic concrete spreader, and more particularly relates to the type of spreader disclosed in Patent 2,373,828, granted April 17, 1945 to E. L. Harrington, and Patent 2,449,710, granted September 21, 1948, to Arthur E. Miller, George K. Viall and Rudolph F. Lindow.

An object of the invention is to provide a spreader reciprocable transversely of the roadway for moving concrete deposited on the subgrade laterally or both laterally and forwardly to effect uniform distribution and leveling action, and more particularly to provide electrically controlled mechanism for achieving angular changes in paddle attitudes overriding the reciprocating mechanism whereby changes in angular paddle attitudes may be effected in any positions of the lateral traverse of the padtile and its carriage mount to the end that a greater flexibility of control of the concrete spreading may result in more uniform compactness of the concrete from side form to side form throughout the entire road con struction; and importantly that the paddle may in one attitude be shifted edgewise at the approximate ends of its lateral traverse to knife through, without practical disturbance to, the pile of concrete lately pushed by the paddle in a flatwise position to such ends of the lateral traverse.

Other objects of the invention are to provide for effective yet simple electrical control of paddle movements and paddle attitudes, to provide for instantaneous changes in paddle attitudes and to afford a simplified console or control panel with delineated charts of movements and attitudes in conjunction with the switches for controlling the same to the end that operatives with little experience will be able to effectively control and operate the machine.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a supplemental carriage in which the spreader and its automatic control mechanism may be installed, which supplemental carriage is adapted for detachable connection at the front of a finishing-machine.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention will be more fully described hereinafter, and will be more particularly pointed out in the claims appended hereto. I

In the drawings, wherein like symbols refer to like or corresponding parts throughout the several views:

FIGURE 1 illustrates in dotted diagram a side elevational view of a form of concrete road finishing machine and in full lines a form of automatic concrete spreader pursuant to the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the same showing in full and in dotted lines end and intermediate positions and various angular attitudes of the spreader paddle and its movable carriage mount.

FIGURE 3 is a top plan view, taken on a magnified scale, and with parts broken away and parts shown in sectionof a form of drive means for the paddle carriage.

FIGURE 4 is a front elevational view thereof with parts broken away.

FIGURE 5 is a vertical front elevation, taken on an enlarged scale, of a fonm of paddle and its mount carriage.

FIGURE 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 66 in FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is a similarview taken on the line 77 in FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 8 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 8-8 in FIGURE 5.

ice

FIGURE 9 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 9-9 in FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 10 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on the line 10-10 in FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 11 is also a vertical cross-sectional view taken on the line 1111 in FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 12 is a diagrammatic view showing in plan one arrangement of a cycle of movement of the paddle and through the use of arrows paddle potential attitudes assumed in changing directional movements of the paddle.

FIGURE 13 is a similar diagram showing other potential paddle attitudes automatically assumable with directional changes in paddle reciprocating movements in a second proposed cycle arrangement.

FIGURE 14 is a diagram similar to FIGURE 13 with the paddle attitudes relatively reversed for movement of the concrete in the opposite lateral direction, all in a third proposed pattern of cycle operation.

FIGURE 15 is a diagrammatic view in plan showing the paddle attitudes of FIGURES 12, 13 and 14 in connection with the limit switches illustrated in FIGURES 6 and 7 and in the electrical diagram in FIGURE 17, such figure indicating by the letters A, B, C, D, E and F paddle positions similarly lettered in FIGURES 12, 13 and 14 in conjunction with a switch arm occupying various limit switch positions as indicated by the letters A to F inclusive.

FIGURE 16 is a schematic view showing paddle attitudes and paddle angular movements corresponding to cycle positions of the paddle switch conforming to the proposed cycles illustrated in FIGURES 12, 13, 14 and 15.

FIGURE 17 is a diagrammatic view showing a form of electric circuitry for controlling the paddle attitude and paddle angular movements and also for controlling the movement of the carriage which carries the paddle back and forth across the roadway.

FIGURE 18 is a plan view of a form of control panel showing the paddle switch handle and its three positions, the carriage switch, the carriage stop button and lamps showing power-on and carriage moving.

FIGURE 19 is a schematic showing a form of hydraulic system for carriage paddle control.

FIGURE 20 is also a schematic showing a form of hydraulic system for carriage track drive.

FIGURE 21 illustrates a satellite or drone second paddle with drive mechanism.

FIGURE 22 illustrates a double carriage arrangement with connection to the chain drive.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, designates a finishing machine of a conventional type supported for movement upon the side forms 51, as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2.

As also shown in these figures a supplemental spreader frame 52 is located in front of the finishing machine 5% and is preferably removably attached thereto as by the bolts 53 and 54, having front wheels 55 riding on the'side form 51.

This supplemental spreader frame 52 supports a trans versely extending rail 56 in the form of an I-beam (also shown in FIGURE 8). Attached to the I-beam rail 56 above and below the flanges thereof are relatively inverted V-shape tracks 57 and 58 for receiving pairs of cam rollers 59 and 60 carried by supporting angles 61 and 62 or other structural members of a transversely reciprocating enclosed carriage 63.

The rail 56 may be in section to enable the entire unit to be self-widening.

The carriage 63 thus moves crosswise of the road from side form to side form being driven in this motion by a continuous chain 64 (FIGURES 3, 4, 10 and 11) run- 0, {B ning over end sprockets 65 and 66 and intermediate sprockets 67 and 68, which latter are disposed on opposite sides and in close proximity to a drive sprocket 69. This sprocket-69 is affixed to a shaft 70 which projects through the web of the I-beam rail 56 and has aflixed thereto twin sprockets 71 engaged by twin chains 72 which are in turn engaged with drive twin sprockets 73 on a motor shaft 74 adapted to be driven by a hydraulic, electric or other reversible motor 75, as shown more particularly in FIGURES 3 and 4.

The motor 75 and its driving connections 70, 71, 72, 73 and 74 are installed on subframes 76 and 76 which may be attached to the I-beam in any suitable manner, such motor and connections being at one side of the web of the I-beam 56, as appears from FIGURE 3, while the chain 64 and its sprockets 65, 66, 67 and 68 and the drive sprocket 69 are located on the opposite side of such web.

As shown in FIGURE 7, opposite ends of the chain 64 are aflixed to opposite ends of the carriage 63 whereby movement of the chain 64 in relatively opposite directions will impart to the carriage 63 the reciprocating motion back and forth transversely of the roadway.

It will be understood that the foregoing is only one form ofdrive mechanism for the carriage which has been found successful in practice.

The carriage supports the spreader member, preferably in the form of a paddle 77, by which the paddle is bodily moved on a motion of translation back and forth with its lower edge substantially at form line or slightly above the same so as to encounter masses of concrete dumped upon the subgrade between the side forms.

As more particularly appears from FIGURES and 8, the paddle 77 is a substantially flat blade lying below the carriage 63 and mounted to a lower end of a substantially vertical rotary shaft 78 mounted in bearings 79 and 80 affixed to the carriage 63.

The carriage is for convenience in the form of the invention illustrated divided into three compartments by substantially horizontal partitions 81 and 82, such compartments being an upper compartment 83, an intermediate compartment 84 and a lower compartment 85.

In the intermediate compartment 84 the rotary shaft 78 has affixed thereto a pinion 86 disposed in mesh with a gear rack 87 (FIGURE 7), which rack is aflixed to movable cylinder 88 of a hydraulic motor, the other component of which is a stationary piston 89 outstanding from an intermediate portion of a support rod 90 affixed to the side walls of the carriage 63. The stationary piston 89 and the internal wall of the reciprocating cylinder 88 are of greater diameter than the diameter of the support rod 90 to provide internal chambers 88 and 88 within the cylinder 88 between the stationary piston 89 and the movable end walls 88 and 88 of the reciprocating cylinder 88. Hydraulic fluid is delivered to and from these chambers through appropriate pipe or tube connections 91 and 92.

The rack 87 fastened to the cylinder 88 translates linear motion of the double-ended cylinder 88 into rotary motion through the pinion gear 86 and thus rotates shaft 78 to cause angular adjustment of the paddle 77 to various angular attitudes.

As shown in FIGURES 5, 8, 9 and 19, in the lower compartment 85 of the carriage is installed an electric or other motor 93 in driving relation to a pump 94 for supplying hydraulic fluid under pressure to the chambers of the hydraulic motor 88, 89. The hydraulic fluid or oil is drawn from and returned to a reservoir 95 also in the lower compartment.

. In the fluid line between the pump 94 and the chambers of the cylinder 88 (FIGURES 7, 8, 17 and 19) is installed a double solenoid spring-centered neutral valve 96 installed in the intermediate chamber 84 of the carpaddle angular attitude adjustment.

riage adjacent to the cylinder 88, as best seen in FIG- URES 7 and 8. This solenoid control valve has coils SVC and SVD appearing in the circuit diagrams of FIG- URES 17 and 19.

The circuit diagrams, FIGURES 17, 19 and 20, show an electrical control for carriage movement and also for The motor 75 for driving the carriage on its back and forth movement is shown as a hydraulic motor (FIGURE 3), and the circuit diagrams (FIGURES 17 and 20) show that a similar double solenoid spring-centered neutral hydraulic valve 22 controls the supply and exhaust of the hydraulic fluid to the motor 75, the two solenoids being indicated as SVA and SVB.

The angular attitude of the paddle is controlled electrically by limit switches L831, L532, LS33, L534 and L535 (FIGURES 6, 7 and 8). As shown in the circuit diagram, FIGURE 17, these limit switches are connected in a preset manner to the windings of the solenoid valve. Switches LS31 through LS35 are actuated by an arm 97 and a limit switch LS36 is actuated by a quadrant cam As shown in FIGURE 8, the quadrant cam 98 is affixed to the upper portion of the shaft 78 so as to turn therewith while the arm 97 is aflixed to the cam 98 in a plane below the same so as to sweep through anarc including all of said limit switches LS31-LS35.

The chief advantage of the multi-position rotating paddle 77 is exemplified in the three methods or cycles of operation, as shown in FIGURES 12, 13 and 14. The normal operation when spreading concrete is shown in FIGURE 12. In either direction, the paddle assumes a 45 angle in relation to the reciprocal line of motion. In effect, the concrete is spread both laterally and forwardly. At each end of its travel, the paddle is rotated in the direction of the arrows which is the proper direction to clean out the corners formed by the side skirts 99 of the supplemental frame 52 and strike off member 100.

FIGURE 13 illustrates the second method or cycle of operation whereby it is possible to move concrete laterally only from right to left. This method is employed where excessive concrete is piled on the right side of the machine by uneven depositing of the concrete ahead of the machine.

FIGURE 14 illustrates the exact opposite of FIGURE 13 whereby movement of concrete from left to right laterally only is effected.

In all three cycles of operation the carriage travel is automatically reversed by means of limit switches (denominated RTLS21 and LTLS24 in the schematic diagram, FIGURE 17) which reverse the direction of the carriage drive hydraulic motor 75. The limit switches LS31 through L835 are shown in FIGURE 17 to be connected to the double solenoid hydraulic valve SVC and SVD which in turn determines the flow of hydraulic fluid to the cylinder 88. Electric timers (noted as 1T and 2T in FIGURE 17 provide a delay at each end of carriage travel to allow the paddle to rotate and change attitude before carriage begins movement in opposite direction.

In FIGURE 2 the limit switches RTLS21 and LTLS24 are shown as positioned at opposite ends of the frame 52 where the same will be encountered by adjustable fingers 110, 111 projecting in opposite directions from opposite ends of the carriage 63 when the carriage 63 reaches opposite ends of its traverse, whereby to trip these limit switches causing reverse of the carriage drive and rotation of the paddle.

Each relay 1R and 2R, when energized through its respective limit switch 21 or 24, is held energized through the other limit switch at the opposite end of the carriage support beam (1R, when energized by LTLS24 is held energized through RTLS21 until the paddle carriage returns to the opposite end and actuates it).

As shown on this diagram, FIGURE 17, relays 1R and 2R in the carriage moving circuit are energized by the closing of LTL824 and RTL821 respectively. These relays IR and 2R, in turn, control both the reversing of the carriage drive and the rotation of the paddle 77. Both relays IR and 2R, when energized, are held energized through RTLSZI and LTLS24 limit switches respectively so that, as a carriage travel limit switch is actuated, one relay is energized and the other is simultaneously de-energized. This then reverses the direction of carriage travel and also rotates the paddle by energizing SVC or SVD. Relay contact 1R4 energizes SVC through the paddle switch and 3R relay contact 3R-1, or L832, or L831, depending upon the paddle switch position. At the same time in the reverse direction of the carriage, 2R4 contact energizes SVD through the paddle switch and L835 or L834 or 3R-2 contact. The paddle switch position then determines which limit switch will stop rotation of the paddle to position it at the proper attitude as also determined by the carriage direction.

The diagram, FIGURE 17, shows the five positions of the paddle switch. The reason for. positions 2 and 4 is to always return the paddle to its center position (parallel to machine) before moving on to the selected position. As seen on the schematic, relay 4R is energized through switch No. 2 and switch No. 4 (part of paddle switch and closed at positions 2 and 4 respectively), and 4R contact 4R3, then energizes SVC or SVD depending upon the position of limit switch L836 and contact 4R-2 holds 4R relay energized. As previously pointed out, L836 is actuated by a quadrature cam 98. This will then determine which direction the paddle must rotate to return to its center position since L836 selects the proper coil in the solenoid valve.

When center is reached, 3R3 contact de-energizes 4R and the closing of 4R-1 contact allows the paddle to proceed to attitude as determined by the paddle switch setting. It was necessary to connect a relay (3R) to L833 only because of the number of contacts required.

To aid in visualizing what happens when switching from one cycle to another (FIGURES 12, 13 and 14, or vice versa), reference is made to FIGURES 15 and 16. The paddle attitudes in FIGURE 15 are illustrated in conjunction with the limit switches L831 through L835 and these paddle attitudes coincide wih the paddle attitudes of FIGURES 12, 13 and 14.

Following across the chart, FIGURE 16, one can determine from the Paddle Attitude column, the direction of paddle angular adjustment by referring to the diagrams of FIGURE 15 since the numbers represent paddle limit switch positions. Note that in four cases the paddle moves twice to reach its final position. This occurs when it first moves to center position and then reverses direcion to reach final position.

The above method of switching is necessary to make the operation as flexible as possible. The operator can choose the cycle of operation or method of moving concrete at any time since, in effect, the direction of paddle rotation is compensated by means of the intermediate limit switches L832 and L834.

Because of the 180 rotation, the electrical circuit must decide for itself in which direction to rotate the paddle regardless of the initial position of the latter. The operator has only to recognize that the paddle switch should be in any one of the center No. 3 or two extreme outside positions No. 1 or No. 5 and merely skip through the intermediate positions No. 2 or No. 4 when switching.

One of the outstanding features of this invention is the simplified control which makes it very easy for the operator.

Whenever the carriage is reversed, the paddle automatically changes to the opposite 90 attitude in that particular sequence. In the normal operation, the carriage traverses the entire width of the roadway where limit switches RTLSZI and LTLS24 at the ends of each pass reverse the direction of the carriage and automatically changes the attitude of the paddle.

In FIGURES 1'3 and 14 it will be clear that in one pass of the paddle the same wil assume a flatwise position in reference to the direction of its movement for maximum effort in moving the mass of concrete from one side of the roadway to the other; and in the correlative subsequent pass the blade or paddle is presented edgewise to the direction of its movement whereby to cut through the mass of concrete lately shifted by the broad side or fiatwise pass of the paddle. During edgewise movement of the paddle the same is able to knife through the pile with a minimum of resistance.

The use of electric circuit controls gives extreme flexibility for varying operational requirements.

If desired, as shown in FIGURE 21, a satellite or drone second paddle 77 may be operated from the shaft 78. A sprocket and chain drive 126 between the shaft 78 and the satellite paddle shaft 78 provides an additional paddle which would substantially double the productive .eifortof the entire rig.

In many instances where extremely large amounts of concrete must be handled, present-day spreaders exert considerable side thrust against the road forms. With this new type of construction shown in FIGURE 22 it would be possible to mount two independent carriages 63 and 63 on the rail 56, fastening one to the upper course of the chain 64 and the other to the lower course of the chain, so that each carriage would only cover half of the roadway and each paddle would move in the opposite direction across the roadway with relation to the other; thus neutralizing the resultant thrust force mentioned above.

In operation, referring to FIGURE 18, the paddle switch handle 7 is mounted on a rotary shaft 8 and includes a pointer which by turning points to any one of three selective positions marked off on a panel area 9 on which is delineated an intermediate position marked by an X which corresponds to the paddle switch stop posi tion No. 3 and to the illustration of FIGURE 12 in which the paddle 77 is caused to assume relatively reversed diagonal attitudes incident to its travel back and forth pursuant to the arrow indications A and B.

Still referring to FIGURE 18, a dotted position S of the paddle switch handle 7 points to a left-hand arrow indicating paddle switch stop position No. 1 and a cycle of operation, as represented in FIGURE 13, of the paddle 77 in alternate edge and flatwise attitudes indicated by the arrows C and D. A third paddle switch position, represented at 8' in FIGURE 18, to the right on paddle switch stop position No. 5, points to a right-hand arrow on the panel area 9 coresponding to the cycle attitudes of the paddle 77 represented in FIGURE 14 by arrow positions E and F in which the angular paddle attitudes are relatively reversed as respects the showing of FIGURE 13.

FIGURE 15 illustrates at A and B the paddle attitudes similarly lettered in FIGURE 12 in conjunction with the paddle trip arm 97 in contact respectively with limit switches L832 and L834.

This FIGURE 15 also represents at C and D paddle angular attitudes as represented by similar letters in FIGURE 13 with the paddle trip arm 97 in engagement with limit switches L833 and L835 respectively. This FIGURE 15 also shows at E and F the cycle of attitudes of the paddle 77 corresponding to similar letters in FIG- URE 14 with the switch arm 97 in physical engagement with the limit switches L831 and L833 respectively.

Referring to FIGURE 18 the control panel contains a carriage switch 10 movable to positions 10 and 10 for starting carriage movementeither in a leftor right- .hand direction transversely of the roadway.

This carriage switch may be spring loaded biasing the same :to the central full-line open position shown at 10 in FIGURE 17 to which it automaticaly returns after deflection .to either position 10 or 10 In other words the carriage switch 10 :acts to instantaneously close the 7 circuit activating the carriage in either direction and thereupon the switch automatically returns to the central neutral open position 10, all as later explained in connection with the diagram of FIGURE 17.

As shown in FIGURE 18 the control panel also contains a carriage stop switch 11 which may be a push button twpe of switch which is normally closed, as indicated in FIGURE 17, but which may be opened manually in order to suspend carriage operation at any time or any point in the movement of the carriage.

The control panel of FIGURE 18 also contains lamps or lights 12 and 13 indicating respectively pursuant to the legends on the panel that the power has been turned on and that the carriage is in actual movement.

Comparing FIGURES 17 and 18 with respect to paddle switch positions, the switch handle 7 is shown occupying position No. 1 which corresponds to position 8 in FIG- URE 18. The central position of switch handle 7 in FIG- URE 18 corresponds to paddle switch position No '3 of FIGURE 17 and paddle switch handle position 8 of FIGURE 18 corresponds to paddle switch position No. of FIGURE 17. Accordingly, it will be noted that positions No. 2 and No. 4 of the paddle switch, as shown in the circuit diagram of FIGURE 17, are not being directly employed to locate paddle angular attitudes but these two paddle switch positions No. 2 and No. 4 are used only for centering the paddle as later explained.

Referring more particularly to FIGURES 17 and 19, operation is initiated by closing the main current supply switch 14, which energizes lamp 12 and which also energizes the starter 15, the coil of which closes contacts 16, 17 and 18, thus supplying current to the hydraulic pump motor 93 for driving pump 94 which thereupon withdraws supplies of hydraulic fluid from the source 95 and circulates the same to the hydraulic control valve 96 which is controlled by the solenoids SVC and SVD which control the direction of flow of the hydraulic fluid to the motor 88 which through the gear train 87, 86, rotates the paddle shaft 78 controlling angular movement of the paddle 77 movable to the pattern of paddle attitudes already referred to.

Still referring to FIGURE 17, it will be seen that the operator has selected position No. 1 on the paddle switch, thereby closing the two contacts designated No. 1, the paddle switch contacts being all normally open.

This action sets the device for paddle cycle movement of FIGURE 13.

The actual cycle of movement is then begun by closing the carriage switch 10. It will be noted from FIGURE 17 that this switch is a three-position switch being oflF, in the intermediate position, and closable in positions 10 or 10 selectively to close circuit through circuits 19 or 20 which includes directional relays IR and 2R respectively, thus controlling the right or left movements of the carriage 63.

In the event the carriage switch 10 is closed to the position 10 the relay 1R will be energized to close its four contacts 1R-1, 1R2,'1R3 and 1R-4 and opens relay contact 1R-5. By closing contact lR-l, the circuit through the relay 1R is maintained as the carriage switch 10 will automatically open after closing against 10 At this point the right limit switch 21 has been and remains closed, thus establishing circuit through lR-l to 1R and maintaing the closing of contacts 1R-2, 1R-3 and 1R-4. The closing of contact 1R-2 energizes timer 1T. After a time delay the timer 1T closes contact 1T-1 (time delay close) energizing the coil SVA of double solenoid hydraulic valve 22 (FIGURES 17 and 20), thereby starting the carriage motor 75 to drive the carriage in a right-hand direction.

The carriage 63 thereupon continues across the roadway in the right-hand direction until its trip arm 111 (FIG- URE 2) encounters and trips the right limit switch 21 opening the circuit through 1R-1 and de-energizing the right directional relay 1R. This will open contact 1R-2 8 thus de-energizing timer 1T which in turn opens contact 1T-1 and suspends action of coil SVA of the double solenoid hydraulic valve 22 to stop the movement of the carriage.

At the same time the right limit switch 21 is closed against the contacts 23 thus establishing circuit through the left directional relay 2R which in turn closes its contacts 2R-2, 2R-3 and 2R-4 and opens contact 2R5.

As left limit switch 24 is already closed the closing of contact 2R-1 will act to hold the energizing of relay 2R despite the automatic opening of 21 at 23 when the carriage reverses to left-hand movement.

Maintenance of the circuit through 2R through closed contact 2R2 will energize timer 2T. When this timer times out it will close contact 2T-1 (time delay close), thus energizing oppositely acting solenoid SVB of the double solenoid hydraulic valve 22 supplying hydraulic fluid in a reverse circuit to the hydraulic carriage drive motor 75, thus effecting carriage movement in the lefthand direction.

Closing of contact at 2R-3 or 1R-3 merely serves to illuminate the lamp 13 to indicate on the control panel the fact that the carriage is in motion.

Contacts 1R-5 and 2R5 which are opened incident to the energizing of relays IR and 2R will act to prevent simultaneous energizing of the solenoid coils SVA and SVB.

Relay contact 1R4 is closed only during right-han movement of the carriage and 2R-4 is closed only during left-hand movement of the carriage.

The closing of 1R-4 establishes circuit through closed contact No. 1. of the paddle switch through contact 3R-1 and energizes solenoid SVC of hydraulic valve 96 which controls the supply of hydraulic fluid under pressure to the hydraulic motor 88 (FIGURE 19) which will start rotation of the paddle shaft 78 and the paddle 77 in a clockwise direction.

Limit switch L833 which is normally closed, as shown in FIGURE 17, causes energization of relay 3R which closes its contact 3R-1 in the circuit of solenoid SVC just described.

When paddle trip arm 97 arrives at LS33 it will trip the same, opening the circuit and de-energizing relay 3R thus opening the contact 3R-1 and suspending circuit through solenoid coil SVC.

When the carriage is at its extreme right-hand position and the directional relay 2R is energized, its contact 2R-4 closes establishing a circuit through lower No. 1 contact of the paddle switch, LS35 and energizes solenoid coil SVD in the double solenoid hydraulic valve 96, thus circulating fluid in an opposite direction to the motor 88 causing the rotation of the shaft 78 and the paddle 77 in a counterclockwise direction.

When the arm 97 trips limit switch L535, this circuit is opened and the solenoid valve SVD de-energized, thus the rotation of the paddle in relatively opposite directions is governed and controlled by the angular movement of the trip arm 97 which, due to its angular movement with the shaft 78 and the paddle 77, accurately determines paddle angular movement and ultimate paddle attitude. During rotation of the paddle 77 the carriage is prevented from moving by means of the time delay relays IT or 2T.

The action continues automatically in that the carriage right and left limit switches 21 and 24 cause reversal of transverse movement of the carriage at each pass across the roadway and at the end of each pass establish a sufficient dwell and during that dwell automatically act to reverse angular movement of the paddle to bring it to ultimate relative attidudes according to the cycle patterns illustrated in FIGURES 12, 13 and 14. It will be understood that these cycle attitudes which are three in number are only exemplary and other potential relative paddle attitude positions might be established by slight changes in circuitry.

As before stated the paddle switch contacts No. 1

through No. 5 are normally open but are only closed when the paddle switch handle 7 is set to a particular contact point or position. For instance, in FIGURE 17 the two switch contacts Nos. 1 are closed pursuant to handle position 7 at stop position No. 1. When in this position paddle attitude is controlled by contact 3R-I and limit switch L835.

When the handle 7 is turned to paddle switch position No. 3 the two paddle switch contacts Nos. 3 are then closed and circuits to the solenoid coils SVC and SVD are controlled by the limit switches L832 and L834.

When the handle 7 of the paddle switch is deflected to paddle switch position No. 5 both paddle switch contacts Nos. 5 are closed and the circuits therethrough to the solenoid coils SVC and SV D are controlled by the limit switch L831 and relay contact 3R2.

Pursuant to the one form of circuit diagram illustrated in FIGURE 17, paddle switch positions Nos. 2 and- 4 are not employed directly to determine any particular paddle final attitude but these positions Nos. 2 and 4 must be gone through in moving, for instance from positions Nos. 1 to 3 or Nos. 3 to 5, or vice versa; but in any event always when switching from one cycle to another, .either paddle switch contact No. 2 or No. 4 will close thus energizing relay 4R. The whole purpose is to return the paddle to the center position or the trip arm 97 to the position of L833. By center position is meant either position C or F of FIGURE 15.

When relay 4R is energized contacts 4R-2 and 4R3 will close and contact 4R-1 will open. Energization of relay 4R will be maintained through contacts 3R-3 and 4R-2, thus maintaining the circuit through relay 4R despite the fact that paddle switch contact N0. 2 may meantime open, for instance through a fast movement by the operator of the paddle switch handle 7 through switch position No. 2. Since the paddle is not in the center position, L833 is closed energizing relay 3R, closing contacts 3R-3 and 3R-4.

Quadrature cam 98 which is used to actuate L836 determines to which side of the previously-mentioned center the arm 97 is positioned which in turn will determine the necessary direction of the paddle through the energization of either solenoid coils SVC or SVD one of which will be energized through circuit 3R-4, 4R3 and limit switch L836. The paddle will then rotate until arm 97 actuates L833, dc-energizing 3R and opening cont-acts 3R-3 and 3R4 which will de-energize relay 4R and solenoid coil SVC or SVD.

Contacts 4R2 and 4R-3 will open and contact 4R-1 will close allowing the paddle to assume the attitude of paddle switch position Nos. 1, 3 or 5 as previously set on the paddle switch.

T 0 further explain the necessity of returning the paddle to center position as shown in FIGURE 15 at C and F, assume the cycle of operation to be that of FIGURE 13 and the paddle moving in the left-hand direction. The paddle attitude is as shown in D of FIGURE 15 with L835 engaged by trip arm 97 of FIGURE 8. The paddle switch is now rotated to position No. 3 or cycle of operation of FIGURE 12. The paddle attitude must now assume that shown in B of FIGURE 12 and FIGURE 15, resulting in actuation of L834 in its final position.

In further reference to FIGURE 17, since the carriage is moving in a left-hand direction, relay 2R is energized, closing contact 2R-4. When the paddle switch handle 7 is rotated to position No. 3, or the center position of the paddle switch in FIGURE 18, contacts No. 3 of the paddle switch close. The circuit is closed through 4R-1, 2R-4, paddle switch contact No. 3, L834 to hydraulic solenoid SVD to rotate the paddle in a counterclockwise direction. Since the paddle trip arm 97 was initially settion on L835 before the paddle switch was rotated to position No. 3, or the paddle attitude was in its extreme counterclockwise position, the paddle cannot rotate and actuate L834 in a counterclockwise movement. Thus, it

is necessary to first rotate the paddle to center position, or trip arm 97 to L833, as shown in C and F of FIGURE 15. The paddle can now rotate from position C to B as shown in FIGURE 15 in a counterclockwise movement. Thus, when switching the paddle switch from position No. 1 to No. 3 on the operating cycle from FIGURE 13 to FIGURE 12', the switch passes through position No. 2, closing contact No. 2, and returns the paddle to the center position C of FIGURE 15 before proceeding to set position B of FIGURE 12.

The two double solenoid hydraulic valves 22 and 96 are Vickers valves identified as D 6454*018C-40.

The paddle switch '7 is an Allen-Bradley 8-pole switch identified in Bulletin 806-5.

Although we have disclosed herein the best form of the invention known to us at this time, we reserve the right to all such modifications and changes as may come within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination (a) a machine frame,

(b) at least one carriage movably mounted to the frame for reciprocal passes in relatively opposite lateral directions,

(c) at least one paddle type spreader member movably mounted to the carriage having at least two cycles of attitude changes incident to the reciprocal passes of the carriage,

(d) selector means operatively connected to the spreador member or selecting a particular cycle of attitude changes of the spreader member, and

(e) drive means operatively connected to the carriage for moving the carriage and entrained spreader member on motions of translation throughout the range of said reciprocal passes and responsive to the selector means for shifting the spreader member relatively to the carriage through the selected cycle of attitude changes.

2. The combination of claim I, in which (if) at least one cycle of attitude changes involves the spreader member in assuming sequential flatwise and edgeswise attitudes to the line of lateral movements in subsequent passes of the carriage and spreader member.

3. The combination of claim 2 in which (g) a second cycle of attitude changes involves the spreader member in assuming sequential edgewise and flatwise attitudes to the line of lateral movement in subsequent passes of the carriage and spreader member.

4. The combination of claim 2 in which (-g) a second cycle of attitude changes involves the spreader member in assuming relatively reversed diagonal attitudes to the line of lateral movements in subsequent passes of the carriage and spreader member.

5. The combination of claim 1 further comprising (f) limit means associated with the spreader member for causing arrest of further movement of the spreader member when the latter has reached its final selected attitude in any cycle.

6. The combination of claim 1 further comprising (f) a satellite spreader member also movably mounted to the carriage alongside the first-named spreader member for similar cycles of attitude changes, and

(g) drive connections between the first-named and satellite spreader members for driving the latter member through substantially the same cycle of attitude changes as imposed on the first-named spreader member.

7. The combination of claim 1 in which the carriage movement is restricted to a lateral section of the roadway, further comprising (f) a second carriage restricted to another lateral section of the roadway,

(g) a second spreader member movably mounted to the second carriage for at least the same two cycles of attitude changes, and

(h) drive means operatively connected to the second carriage for driving the second carriage in opposite lateral directions relatively to the directions of movement of the first-named carriage.

8. The combination of claim 1 further comprising (f) manual control means operatively connected to the drive means and the selector means for interrupting subsequently continuing or reversing carriage drive and continuing or changing the cycle of attitude pattern at any point in the operations.

-9. The combination of claim 1 in which the drive means includes erning the actuation of the carriage and its reversing movements, for effecting attitude changes in the spreader member and for arresting the spreader member on reaching each final attitude for each pass of the carriage.

10. The combination of claim 9 in which said selector means comprises (i) a manual switch having stop positions in number not less than the number of cycles of attitude changes of the spreader member and having normally open switch members in the electrical circuit control means corresponding to the number of stop positions and closable selectively by the manual switch to activate the motor means, and further comprising (j) spreader member arresting means comprising (k) a series of normally closed limit switches in the electrical circuit control means and in circuit with said manual switch members, and

(l) a switch opening member responsive to attitude movements of the spreader member and related to the normally closed limit switches to open the same successively until the circuit is opened corresponding to the selected final attitude of the spreader member.

11. The combination of claim 10 in which (m) the series of normally closed limit switches are arranged at least part circularly and (n) the switch opening member is an arm disposed to wipe across the limit switches, said arm being movable with the spreader memben 12. The combination of claim 11 further comprising (0) a quadrature cam movable with the arm, and

(p) a limit switch in the path of the cam to be engaged thereby over an area of substantially ninety degrees.

13. The combination of claim 9 in which the motor means are (i) hydraulic motors, and said electrical circuit control means includes (j) electrically actuated valves for controlling the supply and exhaust to and from the motors for controllably driving the motors in forward or reverse directions.

14. The combination of claim 9 further comprising (i) timing means in the electric circuit control means for establishing dwell periods of the carriage at the ends of its passes during which the spreader member attitude changes are effected.

15. The combination of claim 9 further comprising (i) right and left limit switches in the electrical circuit control means at opposite sides of the frame positioned to be impinged by the carriage at the ends of each pass to cause reversal of movement of the carriage.

16. The combination of claim 1 in which (f) one cycle of attitude changes involves the spreader member in assuming sequential flatwise and edgewise attitudes to the line of lateral movements in subsequent passes of the carriage and spreader member,

(g) a second cycle of attitude changes involves the spreader member in assuming sequential edgewise and fiatwise attitudes to the line of lateral movements in subsequent passes of the carriage and spreader member,

(h) a third cycle of attitude changes involves the spreader member in assuming relatively reverse diagonal attitudes to the line of lateral movements in subsequent passes of the carriageand spreader member,

and

(i) one of said three cycles of attitude changes may be selected.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Olton 192-142 CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

JACOB L. NACKENOFF, Examiner.

N. C. BYERS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3738763 *Jun 3, 1971Jun 12, 1973Bid Well CorpConcrete finishing machines
US3970405 *May 3, 1974Jul 20, 1976Cmi CorporationSlipform paving apparatus
US7802652 *Mar 13, 2006Sep 28, 2010Aluminum Ladder CompanyServicing station for tractor trailer trucks
DE102011101942A1 *May 18, 2011Nov 22, 2012Bilfinger Berger Ingenieurbau GmbhFertiger und Schwertverteiler für einen Fertiger
WO2012155905A1 *May 18, 2012Nov 22, 2012Bilfinger Berger Ingenieurbau GmbhFinisher, and plow-type spreader for a finisher
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/101
International ClassificationE01C19/18, E01C19/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/187
European ClassificationE01C19/18D