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Publication numberUS3255824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1966
Filing dateDec 11, 1963
Priority dateDec 11, 1963
Publication numberUS 3255824 A, US 3255824A, US-A-3255824, US3255824 A, US3255824A
InventorsRodgers Arthur
Original AssigneeFire Guard Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire extinguisher with side mounted cartridge
US 3255824 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1966 A. RODGERS 3,255,824

FIRE EXTINGUISHER WITH SIDE MOUNTED CARTRIDGE Filed Dec. 11, 1963 l7 l9 ll '9 l6 20 3 3 22 Z i '6 7 I 23 4 I5 .L l8

4i l3 ft, I0 I I I? g 4 l3 I 1 l4 I I 1 I4 2| I vill 5 INVENTOR. 32 AR T RODGERS BY 0%?? F G ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,255,824 FIRE EXTINGUISHER WITH SIDE MOUNTED CARTRIDGE Arthur Rodgers, Northlbrook, 111., assignor to The Fire Guard Corporation, a corporation of Illinois Filed Dec. 11, 1963, Ser. No. 329,735 6 Claims. (Cl. 169-31) This invention relates generally to fire extinguishers and more particularly, to portable type dry-chemical fire extinguishers in which a cartr-idgecontaining compressed gas is mounted to the exterior of the extinguisher.

In the type 0f extinguishers under consideration, there is provided a cylindrical tank containing a dry chemical together with a cooperating cartridge member containing a compressed gas such as CO When the extinguisher is to be operated, suitable valve means are actuated to interconnect the CO cartridge with the interior of the tank so that the compressed gas will force the dry chemical extinguishing material through a suitable outlet hose, generally extending from the bottom of the tank.

To meet certain specifications, fire extinguishers of the foregoing type have been provided with the cartridge member itself mounted exteriorly of the tank. By this arrangement, the cartridge may be readily replaced with a new charged cartridge without having to dis-assemble the complete extinguisher.

With the foregoing in mind, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a greatly improved dry-chemical type fire extinguisher incorporating an exterior mounted cartridge wherein the overall size of the extinguisher is not appreciably increased notwithstanding the exterior mounting of the cartridge. As a consequence, a compact portable unit may be provided.

Another important object of this invention is to provide a compact tank and cartridge combination for a portable fire extinguisher incorporating means whereby the cartridge may be very easily removed and replaced with a new cartridge.

Another important object is to provide an improved portable type dry chemical fire extinguisher incorporating an exterior mounted cartridge in which it is not possible to inadvertently operate the extinguisher during the removal and replacement of the cartridge.

Briefly, these and other objects and advantages of this invention are attained by providing a tank structure having an indented side portion for receiving an exteniorly mounted cartridge. The arrangement is such that when the cartridge is in a first position it is nested within the indented side portion so that the overall size of the extinguisher is not appreciably increased. The cartridge'im cludes a head assembly which in turn is swingably mounted to a frame structure secured to the side of the tank portion of the extinguisher. The cartridge itself is threaded to the head assembly so that outward swinging movement of the cartridge to a second position may take place about the swingable mounting thus freeing the cartridge from the indented .side portion and facilitating the unth-reading and replacement thereof.

The frame structure includes an operating lever arranged to actuate a valve in the head assembly of the cartridge to pass gas from the cartridge to the interior of the tank. However, the geometry of the swingable mounting is such that the lever is ineffective to operate the valve when the cartridge is in its second position free of the indented sidewall. Thus, it is not possible for inadvertent operation of the extinguisher to take place which replacing a cartridge.

A better understanding of the invention will be had by now referring to a preferred embodiment thereof as illus trated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view partly broken away illustrating the improved fire extinguisher of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a front elevational view thereof;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-section taken in the direction of the arrows 3-3 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 4 is another enlarged fragmentary cross-section taken in the direction of the arrows 4-4 of FIG- URE 2. 1

Referring first to FIGURE 1, the fire extinguisher comprises a tank 10 provided at its upper end with a conventional carrying handle 11. From the lower end of the tank there is provided an outlet hose 12. As shown in the broken away portion, this hose extends from a check valve and blow out hose assembly 12' at the base of the tank. This latter structure is fully set forth and described in co-pending patent application Serial No. 130,794 filed August 11, 1961, for Fire Extinguisher.

As shown in FIGURE 1, a sidewall of the tank 10 is provided with an indented portion defining a cavity 13. Within this cavity there is nesteda cartridge 14 which may constitute a capsule containing compressed gas such as C0 The upper neck portion of the cartridge is threaded to a head assembly 15 in turn mounted to a frame structure 16 for swinging movement about a pivot axis or means 17 from a position, as shown, parallel to the tank 10 to a position at an angle thereto. The arrangement is such that the cartridge may be swungoutwardly from the indented portion 13 to the dotted line position 14'.

The frame structure 16 is rig-idly supported to the side of the tank 10 by means of a communication. fitting 18 threaded into the tank and incorporating a suitable passage means so that the contents of the cartridge 14 may be placed into communication with the interior of the tank. Also supported by the frame structure is an operating lever 19 pivoted at 20 for movement in a generally downward direction. As will become clear as the description proceeds, downward movement of the operating lever 19 will serve to operate a valve incorporated within the head assembly 15 when the cartridge 14 is in its solid line or nested position to place the gas within the cartridge 14 in communication with the interior of the tank 10 through the fitting 18.

In its first or normal nested position, the cartridge 14 is held within the indented portion 13 by a simple spring clip 21 are clearly shown in both FIGURES 1 and 2. To prevent inadvertent operation of the extinguisher by the lever 19, a simple pull pin 22 may be provided in the frame structure 16 passing transversely beneath the lever 19, as shown in FIGURE 2, thus blocking downward movement of the lever.

Referring now to FIGURES 3 and 4, the manner in which the contents of the cartridge 14 may be placed in communication with the interior of the tank 10 will become clear. As shown, the head assembly incorporates a valve means including a valve stem 23 extending normally from the upper end of the head assembly as clearly shown in FIGURE 4. The fitting 18 within the indented side portion of the tank 10 includes a threaded coupling 24 provided with an internal passage 25. This structure merges into a yoke structure including a second internal lateral passage 26 terminating in a circumferentially extending passage 27 formed in the head assembly 15.

The circumferential passage 27 extends for an arcuate distance about the head assembly corresponding in degree at least to the degree of swinging movement of the cartridge as depicted by the solid and dotted lines in FIG- URE 1. Thus, the termination of the passage 26 at the plane of the circumferential passage 27 insures communication between these two passages at any position of the cartridge between its first nested position and its second swung out position.

The passage 27 extends axially with respect to the swinging axis 17 through a check valve 28 to a center chamber 29. This center chamber 29 in turn is in communication with the valve stem 23 and various openings 23' therein.

With particular reference now to FIGURE 4, the valve stem 23 is biased upwardly by a spring 30 so that its lower pointed end 31 is in a raised position. This pointed end 31 is arranged to pierce a suitable diaphragm in the upper end of the cartridge when the same is threaded at 32 to the head assembly. Thus, when piercing takes place upon downward movement of the stem, the gas will pass interiorly of the valve stem 23 and/or the openings 23' to the chamber 29 and thence out through the annular passage 27 to the passage 26 described in FIGURE 3 and to the interior of the tank 10.

It will also be evident from FIGURE 4 that when the head assembly and cartridge is swung about the axis 17 which is coaxial with the chamber bore 29 as shown in FIGURE 4, the valve stem portion 23 will swing to the i right and thus be free of the lever member 19. Thus,

any inadvertent pressing of the lever when the head assembly and cartridge is in its second or outwardly swung position will not result in operation of the device, In other words, it is not possible to depress the valve stem 23 by the lever 19 when the assembly is in its outwardly swung position. I Y

In the operation of the improved extinguisher, the cartridge 14 is normally threaded to the head assembly 15 and nested within the indented sidewall 13 as illustrated in solid lines in FIGURES l and 2. When it is desired to operate the extinguisher, the pull pin 22 is removed and the lever element 19 depressed to depress the valve stem 23. With reference to FIGURE 4, depression of the valve stem 23 will cause the end 31 thereof to pierce the normally provided diaphragm in the neck of the cartridge 14 and thus permit gas to pass upwardly through the valve stem openings interiorly of the valve stem to the chamber 29. As described heretofore, the gas within the cartridge 14 is under pressure and will thus operate the check valve 28 shown in FIGURE 3 so that the compressed gas will pass into the annular passage 27 and passage 26 to the interior of the tank 10. The increased pressure within the tank 10 will then expel the dry chemicals through the base outlet hose 12 shown in FIGURE 1.

When the compressed gaswithin the cartridge 14 is exhausted, it is a simple matter to manually swing the cartridge 14 out to the dotted line position 14 illustrated in FIGURE 1. The cartridge itself may be then unthreaded from the thread 32 described in FIGURE 4 and replaced by a new recharged cartridge with a new diaphragm. As described heretofore, when the cartridge and head assembly are in their outwardly swung position, anw inadvertent operation of the lever 19 will not depress the valve stem 23 since it is no longer in a position beneath the lever 19. Accordingly, it is not possible to inadvertently operate the extinguisher when replacing the cartridge.

After the new cartridge has been substituted, the assembly is simply swung back into the spring clip 21 and the extinguisher is then ready for operation.

From the foregoing description, it will be evident that the present invention has provided a greatly improved dry chemical type portable fire extinguisher. Not only are there provided the advantages of an exteriorly mounted cartridge, but these advantages are realized without appreciably increasing the overall size of the unit as a consequence of the indented side portion provided. Moreover, the swing out feature for the cartridge greatly facilitates removal and replacement thereof.

While only one preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described, various modifications falling within the scope and spirit thereof will occur to those skilled in the art. The improved fire extinguisher with an exteriorly mounted side cartridge is therefore not to be though of as limited to the one embodiment set forth merely for illustrative purposes.

What is claimed is:

1. A dry chemical fire extinguisher comprising, in combination: a generally cylindrical elongated tank, said tank being closed oif at each of its ends and having an axially extending indented portion formed in the sidewalls interposed between said ends; a cartridge nested in said indented portion exteriorly of said tank; a frame structure secured to said sidewalls; a head assembly swingably mounted to said frame structure for pivotable movement from a first position substantially parallel to said tank to a second position at an angle thereto; said cartridge being coupled to said head assembly and positioned relative thereto so as to be free of said indented portion when said head assembly is moved to said second position, whereby removal of said cartridge is facilitated.

2. An extinguisher according to claim 1, in which said head assembly incorporates valve means; and in which said frame structure includes means positioned to operate said valve means when said cartridge is nested within said indented portion, said means being ineffective to operate said valve means when said cartridge is swung to a position free of said indented portion.

3. A dry chemical fire extinguisher comprising, in combination: a generally cylindrical elongated tank, said tank being closed off at each of its ends and having an axially extending indented side portion defining a cavity in the sidewalls thereof interposed between said ends; a cartridge for compressed gas mounted exteriorly of said tank and nested in said cavity when in a first position; a head assembly threaded to the upper end of said cartridge; and a frame structure secured to the upper side of said tank; pivot means swingably supporting said head assembly to said frame structure so that the lower end portion of said cartridge can swing outwardly from said cavity to assume a second position exposing said cartridge for easy unthreading from said head assembly and replacement by a substitute cartridge.

4. An extinguisher according to claim 3, in which said head assembly and frame structure include internal passage means; and normally closed valve means in said internal passage means adapted upon opening thereof to place the contents of said cartridge in communication with the interior of said tank.

5. A dry chemical fire extinguisher comprising, in combination: a tank having an indented side portion defining a cavity; a cartridge for compressed gas nested in said cavity when in a first position; a head assembly threaded to the upper end of said -cartridge; and a frame structure secured to the upper side of said tank; pivot means swingably supporting said head assembly to said frame structure so that the lower end portion of said cartridge can swing outwardly from said cavity to assume a second position exposing said cartridge for easy unthreading from said head assembly and replacement by substitute cartridge; said head assembly and frame structure defining internal passage means; normally closed valve means in said internal passage means adapted upon opening thereof to place the contents of said cartridge in communication with the interior of said tank; said internal passage means including a first passage in communication with the interior of said cartridge when said valve means is opened, said first passage including a portion extending at least partially circumferentially around the axis of said pivot means of said head assembly for a degree at least equal to the degree of swinging movement of said cartridge between said first and second positions, said frame assembly including a yoke structure incorporating a second passage passing from the interior of said tank to terminate in the plane of said first passage whereby said first and second passages are in communication when said cartridge is in its first, second, or any intermediate position.

6. An extinguisher, according to claim 5, in which said valve means includes a valve stem projecting from said head assembly; and actuating means including a lever member pivoted to said frame structure and s0 positioned as to be adapted to engage and depress said valve stem when said cartridge is in said first position to actuate said valve means, said valve stem being moved to a position free of any engagement by said lever member when said cartridge is in said second position whereby operation of said valve means by said lever is prevented when changing said cartridge.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,182,742 12/1939 Brewer 222-399 2,338,313 1/ 1944 Bishop 1.6931 2,531,123 11/1950 Guise et a1. 169- 31 2,805,846 9/ 1957 Dewan 2225 3,149,667 9/1964 Blair 169-31 FOREIGN PATENTS 62,215 12/ 1954 France.

(1st addition to No. 1,035,220) 3,009 2/ 1896 Great Britain. 14,313 6/ 1909 Great Britain. 20,767 1/1900 Switzerland.

EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

J. D. HUSSER, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3554450 *Nov 15, 1968Jan 12, 1971Thomas F D MuhalaSpray gun with replaceable cartridges
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Classifications
U.S. Classification169/77, 222/5, D29/126, 169/85, 222/399, 239/304, 239/309, 169/51, 220/23.83
International ClassificationA62C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C13/006
European ClassificationA62C13/00D