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Publication numberUS3256015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1966
Filing dateJan 9, 1963
Priority dateJan 9, 1963
Publication numberUS 3256015 A, US 3256015A, US-A-3256015, US3256015 A, US3256015A
InventorsPerrin William E
Original AssigneePerrin William E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exercising apparatus
US 3256015 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1966 w. E. PERRIN 3,256,015

EXERC I S ING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 9, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.1.

INVENTOR. Wmmm E. PERR\N Hume s June 14, 1966 w. E. PERRIN 3,256,015

EXERCISING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 9, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR WILLIAM E. PERR\N F1 XMWSMHUM AHar gvs United States Patent 3,256,015 EXERCISING APPARATUS William E. Perrin, 410 N. Hillsdale,'Bloomington, Ind. Filed Jan. 9, 1963, Ser. No. 250,296 13 Claims. (Cl. 272-80) The present invention relates to exercising apparatus.

Perhaps the primary manner of improving performance in' various track and field events as well as other athletic endeavors such as bowling, swimming, throwingetc; is actual practice of the skills and motions involved. In many cases, however, other types of practice or exercises are necessary, for example, to increase muscle power of muscles used in the athletic endeavor. In certain cases, athletes are cautioned against such exercises as the lifting of heavy weights because some coaches feel that even though such exercises increase strength, they also slow down the athlete, reducing agility and producinga condition referred to as muscle-bound.

One object of the present invention is to provide apparatus which is capable of use to approximate the motions involved in various athletic events, said apparatus acting to provide resistance against which the athlete can work to build up his muscles, yet not involving the bar bell or lifting weight type of resistance.

Still another object of the invention is to provide exercising apparatus which is usable in confined spaces, yet which makes possible the user obtaining a good work out or exercise session.

A further object of the invention is to provide exercising apparatus incorporating novel means for attaching a resilient resistance-providing means to various handles, foot receiving apparatus and the like.

Another object of the present invention is to provide exercising apparatus of the above discussed type in which the resistance can be easily and conveniently adjusted to higher or lower values.

Still another object of the invention is to provide exercising apparatus which can be used for isometric contractions.

The full nature of the invention will be understood from the accompanying drawings and the following description and claims.

FIG. 1' is a perspective view of a bar or handle means forming a part of the exercising apparatus of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 of an alternative form of bar intended for gripping by one hand.

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIGS. 1 and 2 of a further form of single hand bar. I

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of a further alternative handle means making up a part of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a further elevationof the structure of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a shoe or foot holster forming a part of the present invention.

FIGS. 7 and 8 are perspective views of the ends of theends of the bars illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, respectively, additionally showing a resilient, resistance-providing means attached thereto.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a resilient, resistanceproviding means usable with the handle means and foot holster illustrated in FIGS. 1-8.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a device for supporting "ice the resistance-providing means of FIG. 9 against a door or the like.

FIG. 11 is a side elevation illustrating one manner of operation of the device of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an athlete using the apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 3, 8 and 9.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of an athlete apparatus of FIGS. 6 and 9.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of an athlete using the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 9.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of an athlete using the apparatus of FIGS. 2 and 9.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of an athlete using the apparatus of FIGS. 4, 5 and 9.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIG. 1 a cylindrical bar or rod 20 having a length of perhaps two to three feet and a diameter of using the perhaps an inch to one and one-half inch. Through tihe bar 20 are drilled bores 21, 22 and 23. The various bores 21-23 are parallel and all extend completely through the rod 20. In FIG. 9, there is illustrated a length of resilient material 25 which may be formed of synthetic or real rub her or other material of this type capable of great elastic deformation. The material 25 is circular in cross section and has high frictional capability.

Referring to FIG. 14, the bar 20 is shown in use by an athlete 26. 'It can be seen that the athlete has one foot 27 resting on the center of the resilient material 25 and is forcing the bar 20 upwardly against the resistance provided by the resilient material 25.

Referring to FIG. 7, the manner of attachment of the resilient material to the bar 20 is illustrated. It can be -seen that the material 25 extends through one of the apertures 21 and then is looped back again through the other aperture 21. Because of the high frictional characteristics of the material 25, the attachment provided by the loop 30 is secured and does not slip. The material 25 is commercially available and can be purchased from Fisher Scientific Equipment Co. of Chicago, Illinois. The material 25 is composed of latex rubber and can have a normal in FIG. 14 can be easily adjusted in order to vary the resistance provided. Thus, the material 25 is drawn to a greater or lesser extent through the two bores 21 in order to vary the unstressed length of the loop 31 of material 25 extending between the bores 21 and 23.

' It should be understood that the exercise, one position of which is illustrated in FIG. 14, is only representative of the many and varied exercises that can be performed with the apparatus of FIGS. 1, 9 and 14. For example, the athlete illustrated in FIG. 14 might be exercising his arms by repeatedly raising and lowering the bar 20 or might'be exercising his leg by repeatedly raising and lowering his foot 27.

Referring to FIG. 2, a further rod 35 is'illustrated which is identical to the rod of FIG. 1 except that the rod 35 is shorter having a length of approximately one foot and with the further exception that the rod 35 is provided with only two sets of bores 36 and 37. Simi- 3 lar to the bores of rod 20, the bores 36 and 37 are parallel to one another and extend completely through the rod 35.

The attachment of the resistance-providing material 25 to the rod 35 is similar to the attachment of the material 25 to the rod and can be accomplished as suggested in FIG. 7. It can be appreciated that the adjustable nature of the rod in FIG. 1 explained above is also present in the rod 35. The rod 35 may be used for various exercises one of which is illustrated in FIG. 15 and is the simulation of a tennis overhand drive or stroke. Of course, some device for fixing in place the end (not shown) of the material which is away from the handle 45 should be provided. Such a device is illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11 and is described below.

It should be mentioned at this point that the material 25 can be used with either the rod 20 or the rod as well as with all of the apparatus illustrated in the present description. This feature along with the adjustability of the present apparatus makes the present invention highly versatile and flexible, making possible use of the apparatus for many different types and kinds of exercises.

In FIG. 3, there is illustrated a further rod which is identical to the rods 20 and 35 except that rod 45 is shorter having a length of approximately four inches or thereabouts and with the further exception that the rod 45 is provided with two bores therethrough which are arranged at different angles relative to the axis of the rod 45. Thus, the projection of the axis of one of the bores 46-is at right angles to the axis of the other bore 46. This angular relationship of the bores 46 makes possible a different type of attachment of the material 25 to the rod 45 as illustrated in FIG. 8. It can be seen that the material 25 is first projected through one of the bores 46 and then is projected through the other bore 46 to form the desired attachment. The good frictional characteristics of the material 25 insure that the material 25 is maintained securely by the bar 45. Similarly to the above described bars 20 and 35, the material 25 can be adjusted to vary the place of attachment along the length of the material 25 and to thereby vary the resistance for the exercise being performed.

Referring to FIG. 12, there is illustrated an athlete 47 using the bar 45 of the present invention. It can be seen that the bar 45 has a length approximating the width of the athletes hand and that the material 25 extends between the fingers of the athlete. Thus, the device shown in assembled relation in FIG. 12 can be used, for example, to practice a baseball throwing action or to practice a punching action for strengthening the muscles of a boxer.

Referring to FIG. 6, there is illustrated a shoe holster including a foot or shoe-surrounding strap 56 and a further heel-surrounding strap 57 both of which may be formed of canvas, leather or the like. A plurality of rings 60, 61 and 62 are secured to the device 55, the rings 60 and 61 retained between the strap 56 and the strap 57 by the straps being sewn together. The ring 62 is received between the strap 57 and a further strip of material 65 sewn to the strap 57. The length of the strap 57 can be adjusted for various sized feet by means of the buckle 66. That is, the strap 57 includes two parts, the total length of which can be adjusted by the buckle 66. Any pair of the rings 60, 61 or 62 can be used for attaching the resilient material 25 to the foot. For example, as shown in FIG. 13, the rings 62 can be used for this attachment. While neither FIGS. 6 nor 13 show the details of such an attachment, FIG. 11 relating to a different apparatus shows a suitable such attachment of material 25 to a pair of rings. The assembly illustrated in FIG. 13 can be used for practicing a kicking motion or for other leg exercises. The rings 60 or 61 might be used for exercising the outer or inner muscles of the legs, for example, in practicing the motions used in certain types of swimming kicks.

In FIGS. 4 and 5, there is illustrated an oblong partspherical plate having a plurality of bores 76 therethrough at generally equally spaced locations across the length and width of the shape 75. The bores 76 are used for attaching the resilient material 25. This attachment is accomplished similarly to the above described attachments to the bars 20 and 35 by inserting the end of the material 25 through one of the bores 76 from one side 77 of the shape 75 to the other side 78, by looping the material around and reinserting it through a further one of the bores 76 from the other side 78 to the one side 77. The apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5 and 9 is then used as illustrated in FIG. 16 for the simulation of, for example, the motions used in swimming or bowling. Thus, the athlete 80 can take the usual four-step approach used in bowling and can practice the bowling ball delivery against the resistance of the material 25.

In all of the examples of use illustrated in FIGS. 12, 13, 15 and 16, it is necessary that the unshown end of the material 25 be fixedly secured. Such an attachment can be eifected by use of the apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. This apparatus comprises a wedge to which is secured a canvas or leather strap 86 having one end 88 looped over a pair of rings 87 and secured to the central portion of the strap at 90 by sewing or the like.

The wedge 85 can be placed beneath a closet door 91, for example, in the athletes dormitory room. The end 92 of the material 25 is then secured by looping it through the rings 87 in the manner shown. Because of the high frictional characteristics of the material, it retains its attachment to the rings even though the material 25 is repeatedly stretched and released. It will be appreciated that the material 25 can be adjusted in length perhaps with less interference with the particularexercises being performed by adjusting the manner of attachment of the end 92 to the rings 87 as opposed to adjusting the attachment to the body contacting portion of the exercising assembly.

The present apparatus can be used for practicing isometric contractions. Such contractions are achieved when a muscle develops tension which is insufiicient to move a body part against a given resistance. The present apparatus can be used to reach a position for isometric contraction by pulling or pushing against the resistance of the resilient member 25 until it becomes an immovable resistance. Various positions can be used for isometric contractions, one of which is illustrated in FIG. 14.

From the above description, it can be seen that the present invention provides exercising apparatus which is capable of many and varied uses. Practically all of the motions involved in the various track and field events and various other athletic endeavors can be simulated with resistance provided for increasing muscle strength. It will also be evident that the present invention provides exercising apparatus usable in confined spaces such as in the dormitory room of a student-athlete. The novel attaching means of the present invention is also one of its most important features since it makes possible easy and convenient adjustment of the amount of resistance exerted against the athletes motions.

While the invention has been disclosed and described in some detail in the drawings-and foregoing description, they are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, as modifications may readily suggest themselves to persons skilled in this art and within the broad scope of the invention, reference being had to the appended claims.

The invention claimed is:

1. Exercising apparatus comprising a cylindrical rod of sufiicient length to permit gripping by two hands, said rod having a pair of parallel bores through each end thereof and perpendicular to the axis of said rod, and a free elongated loop of elastic material having one end threaded through one pair of bores and the other end threaded through the other pair of bores, said loop comprising means engageable with a relatively fixed object for tensioning muscles when said rod is manipulated through exercising motions.

2. Exercising apparatus comprising a rod, said rod having a pair of openings through each end thereof, and a free elongated loop of elastic material having one end threaded through one pair of openings and the other end threaded through the other pair of openings the threaded relation of said ends to said rod comprising the sole means for securing said loop to said rod.

3. Exercising apparatus comprising a cylindrical rod having a pair of parallel bores therethrough, said bores being at right angles to the axis of said rod and spaced longitudinally of said rod, an elongated elastic member having one end threaded through one of said bores from one side of said rod to the other and threaded through the other of said bores from the other side of said rod to said one side, a wedge adapted to be received in wedging relation beneath a door or the like, a strap secured at one end to said wedge and adapted to extend'beneath the door, and a pair of rings having the other end of said strap sewn thereabout, said elastic member having its other end entwined around and between said rings, said member providing means for tensioning muscles when said rod is manipulated through exercising motions.

4. Exercising apparatus comprising a cylindrical rod having a pair of parallel bores therethrough, said bores being at right'angles to the axis of said rod and spaced longitudinally of said rod, a free elongated loop of elastic material having one end threaded through one of said bores from one side of said rod to the'other and threaded through the other of said bores from the other side of said rod to said one side, and means for fixing the other end of said loop to said rod.

5. Exercising apparatus comprising a cylindrical rod having a pair of parallel openings therethrough, said openings being at right angles to the axis of said rod and spaced longitudinally of said rod,- and an elongated elastic member having one end threaded through one of said openings from one side of said rod to the other and threaded through the other of said openings from the other side of said rod to said one side, the free end of said elastic member being attachable to a fixed object to provide means for tensioning muscles when said rod is manipulated through exercising motions. Y

6. Exercising apparatus comprising a body contacting element, an elongated elastic member having one end secured to said body contacting element, a wedge adapted to be received in wedging relation beneath a door or the like, a strap secured at one end to said wedge and adapted to extend beneath the door, and a pair of concentric rings having the other end of said strap sewn thereabout, said elastic member having its other end adjustably entwined with said rings.

7. Exercising apparatus comprising a cylindrical rod having a pair of bores therethrough, said bores being at right angles to the axis of said rod, said bores being spaced longitudinally of said rod and at 90 degrees around the outer diameter of said rod, an elongated elastic member having one .end threaded through one of said bores from one side of said rod to the other and threaded through the other of said bores from the other side of said rod to said one side, a wedge adapted to be received in wedging relation beneath a door or the like, a strap I secured at one end to said wedge and adapted to extend beneath the door, and a pair of concentric rings having the other end of said strap sewn thereabout, said elastic member having its other end entwined with said rings.

8. Exercising apparatus comprising a rod having a pair of bores therethrough, said bores being at right angles to the axis of said rod, said bores being spaced longitudinally of said rod and at 90 around the outer diameter of said rod, an elongated elastic member having one end threaded through one of said bores from one side of said rod to 6 the other and threaded through the other of said bores from the other side of said rod to said one side, and means for fixing the other end of said elastic member to a stationary object.

9. Exercising apparatus comprising a rod having a pair of bores therethrough, said bores being at right'angles to the axis of saidrod, said bores being spaced longitudinally of said rodand at 90 around the outer diameter of said rod, and an elongated elastic member having one end threaded through one of said bores from one side of said rod to the other and threaded through the other of said bores from the other side of said rod to said one side, the free end of said elastic member being attachable to a fixed object to provide means for tensioning muscles when said rod is manipulated through exercising motions.

10. Exercising apparatus comprising a relatively flat plate member having a convex outer surface and a concave inner surface, said member having a plurality of parallel bores therethrough extending from said inner surface to said outer surface, an elongated elastic member having one end threaded through one of said bores from said inner surface to said outer surface and threaded through another of said bores from said outer surface to said inner surface, a wedge adapted to be received in wedging relation beneath a door or the like, a strap secured at one end to said wedge and adapted to extend beneath the door, and a pair of rings having the other end of said strap sewn thereabout, said elastic member having its other end entwined around and between said rings, said member providing means for tensioning muscles when said plate member is manipulated through exercising motions.

11. Exercising apparatus comprising a plate member having a convex outer surface and a concave inner surface, said member having a plurality of spaced openings therethrough extending from said inner surface to said outer surface, and an elongated elastic member having one end threaded through one of said openings from said inner surface to said outer surface and threaded through another of said openings from said outer surface to said inner surface, the other end of said elastic member being attachable to a fixed object forproviding means for tensioning muscles when said plate member is manipulated through exercising motions.

12. Exercising apparatus comprising a closed first strap adapted to be received about the arch of the foot, a second strap having opposite ends secured to opposite sides of said closed strap and adapted to be received about the heel of the foot, three pairs of concentric rings secured to said apparatus, 'one ofsaid pairs of rings being secured to one side of said first strap beneath said second strap, a second of said pairs of rings being secured to the other side of said first strap beneath said second strap, a third strap sewn over said third pair of rings and to said second strap and securing said third pair of rings to the heel. covering portion of said third strap, and an elongated elastic member entwined at one end with one of said pairs of rings, the other end of said elastic member being attachable to a fixed object for providing means for tensioning muscles when said closed strap is manipulated through exercising motions.

13. Exercising apparatus comprising a closed toe strap adapted to be received about the arch of the foot, a heel strap having opposite ends secured to opposite sides of said toe strap and adapted to be received about the heel of the foot, three pairs of rings secured to said apparatus, one of said pairs of rings being secured to one side of said toe strap beneath said heel strap, a second of said pairs of rings being secured to the other side of said toe strap beneath said heel strap, a third strap sewn over said third pair of rings and to the middle portion of said heel strap and securing said third pair of rings to the heelcovering portion of said heel strap.

(Other references on following page) 7 8 References Cited by the Examiner 3,068,003 12/ 1962 Portman et a1. 272-79 3,079,657 3/1963 Russell 24-73 UNITED STiATES PATENTS 3,117,781 1/ 1964 Vargo 27279 11/1883 Wilcox.

6/1915 Abplanalp 272-79 FOREIGN PATENTS 1/1929 Wheeler 12420 5 3,677 2/1896 Great Britain. /19 4 Turn r 27 434,067 8/1935 Great Britain. 8/1955 G ri 27 437,960 11/1935 Great Britain. 9/1960 Goodwin 27283 11/1960 Borg 3 19 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Przmaly Exammer.

7/1961 Gale 24-73 10 G. K. KITA, Assistant Examiner.

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US3462142 *May 10, 1966Aug 19, 1969Richard F SterndaleVariable friction type exercising device
US3506262 *Aug 17, 1967Apr 14, 1970Wade Louis RApparatus for rope pulling isometric and isotonic exercises
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/129, 482/125, 24/129.00C, 482/121
International ClassificationA63B21/00, A63B21/16, A63B21/02, A63B21/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/1654, A63B21/04
European ClassificationA63B21/04