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Publication numberUS3256411 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1966
Filing dateFeb 17, 1964
Priority dateFeb 17, 1964
Publication numberUS 3256411 A, US 3256411A, US-A-3256411, US3256411 A, US3256411A
InventorsMahrdt William F
Original AssigneeMahrdt William F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Time delay relay
US 3256411 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14 1966 w. F. MAHRDT 3,256,411

TIME DELAY RELAY Filed Feb. 17, 1964 24 A TTORNE YS United States Patent 3,256,411 TIME DELAY RELAY William F. Mahrdt, 215 Vulcan Ave., Encinitas, Calif. Filed Feb. 17, 1964, Ser. No. 345,158 9 Claims. (Cl. 200-122) The present invention relates to a time delay circuit controller.

The controller of the present invention comprises a base which carries a contact or contacts and a plurality of uprights. A switch contact actuating arm is pivotally connected to the upper ends of the uprights; this arm extends downwardly and carries a contact which is adapted to engage the contact or contacts carried by the base. A heating element is disposed in heat exchange relationship with one of the uprights for effecting expansion mined such bias is maintained by fastening one or the other of the legs of the braces to one or the other of the upright. For example: After the vertically extending legs thereof relative to the other upright when the element is l heated to thereby cause movement of the arm and the contact carried thereby.

Specically, each of the uprights is provided with confronting notches at the upper ends thereof and the upper end of the contact arm is provided with beads which lie within the notches to thus provide pivotal connection with the uprights.

Other features and the advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawing wherein a preferredembodiment of the invention is illustrated.

In the drawing:

FIG. l is a side view of the controller with the cover removed;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the controller with the cover removed;

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the controller;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2, but showing the cover in section; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional View t-aken along line 5 5 of FIG. 1.

Referring more in detail `to the drawing, the controller is shown at 20. It comprises a base 22 formed of dielectric material, preferably of the thermo-setting type ywhereby it is inherently rigid. The base is provided with an integral and downwardly extending plug 24. This plug is cylindrical except for a longitudinally extending rib 26 and is adapted to tit in a cylindrically shaped socket (not shown) having a slot for receiving the rib.

Two uprights 30 and 32 are carried by the base 22. The upright 30 is formed of stainlesssteel and is C-shaped in cross section having integral sections 34, 36 and 38 to form a channel for rigidity. The upright 30 includes an integral base 40 extending from the mid section 36 and h-aving the edges thereof welded to the side sections 34 and 38. The base 40 is drilled to receive the upper end of a post 42. This post is suitably embedded in the base 22 and extends therebelow.

The upright 32 is also formed of stainless steel and is shaped like upright 30 having sections 44, 46 and 48 and a base 50 whichbase is secured to the base 22 by a post 52 in the same manner as upright 30 is secured to base 22 byl post 42. A heating element in the form of Va resistance wire 54 is .in intimate heat exchange relationship with the midsection 46 of upright 32. This resistance wire 54 is in the form of a coil which surrounds a heat withstanding material such as a mica strip 56. The assembly of the strip 56 and wire coil 54 is held in place by a channel shaped stainless steel sheet 58 having sections 60, 62 and 64. The rnid section 62 abuts a mica strip 66; strip 66 is interposed between the mid section 62 and the coil 54 and abuts the coil. The side sections 60 and 64 are spot welded to side sections 44 and 48 of the upright 32.

Two L-shaped braces 68 are attached to uprights 30 and 32. Each has a horizontally extending leg 70 spot 72 are attached lto side sections of upright 32 and after the degree of bias is selected, the ends of legs 70 are spot welded to the side sections of upright 30.

Each of the uprights 30 and 32 is provided with a horizontally extending notch 74 (as viewed in FIGS. l and 4). These notches are disposed adjacent the tops of the uprights; they confront one another and are horizontally disposed. These notches receiveV-shaped beads 76 andV 77 which are disposed on the opposite sides and at the upper end of a contact actuating arm 78; 4these beads are formed by right angle bends in the contact arm 78 and are horizontally disposed and substantially complement the notches. The arm 78 is formed preferably from two elongated pieces of stainless steel sheets 80 and 81 which are welded vto one another. The lower ends of the sheets 80 and 82 are each provided with two spaced apart right angularly bent portions 84. These portions extending vertically and the portions-of sheet from the like portions of sheet 82.' vide a contact 84.

The top of the base 22 carries two conductors 86 and These portions pro- 88. Each conductor is formed, respectively, by a strip of metal, such as beryllium copper, which is bent back on itself to form two legs 90 and 92. These legs are superimposed and extend horizontally. The ends of the legs are bent to extend vertically to provide contacts 94 and 96 for conductor- 8.6 vland contacts 98 and 100 for conductor 88. The contacts 94 and 96 are spaced horizontally from one another; likewise contacts 98 and 100 are spaced from one another. The -pair of contacts 94 and 96 are disposed to receive contact 84, when `the contact actuating arm is moved to one position and the pair of contacts 98 and 100 aredisposed to receive contact 84 when the arm V78 is moved to another position. The conductors 86 and 88, being formed of resilient material, frictionally engage the Contact 84- when the contact 84 is disposed between a pair of contacts 94 and 96. or 98 and 100l That portion of the conductor 86, which is adjacent th'e joint of .the legs thereof, is connected, as by silver solder,

to the top of a post 102. This post is embedded in the base 22 and extends therebelow. Likewise conductor` 88 is connected in the same manner to a like post 104.

The ends of the heating coil 54 are connected, respec- I tively, through Nichrome standard method with the These posts are embedded below.

The heating and cooling of heatedcoil 54 will cause relative heating and cooling of uprights 30 with respect t-o upright 32, resulting iu relative expansion and contraction of upright 32 with respect to upright 30. The heating of upright 32 will cause the left bead 76 -to be raised relative to the right bead 77, causing a clockwise movement to be imparted to contact arm 78, resulting in contact 84 engaging contacts 94 and 96. Upon cooling of ythe coil 54, contact 84 will be separated from contacts 94 and 96, and then upon further cooling of the coil, contact 84 will engage contacts 98 and 100.

If desirable, the resiliency of the stationary contacts may be of such value that they restrain movement of the contact 84 whereby a quick breaking of the current can be elfected or a quick breaking and making of the current can be effected.

If desirable an endless clip 110 can be provided which ribbons (not shown) and in the in the base 22 and extend thereextend outwardly v top ends of posts 106 and 108.

encircles the uprights 30 and 32. The confronting inner edges 112 of the clip Iare shaped to bite into the uprights whereby preventing separation of the uprights from one another.

The base 22 is provided with a stepped circular periphery as shown at 114 to receive the lower edge of a circular cover 116.

From the foregoing it is apparent that there has been provided a study time delay controller which is reliable and inexpensive to manufacture. The posts heretofore mentioned form plugs which are received by an electrical socket (not shown).

While the form of embodiment herein shown and described, constitutes preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms may be adopted falling within the scope of the claims that follow.

I claim:

1. A time delay circuit controller, comprising in combination:

(A) a base;

(B) a plurality of uprights carried by the base;

(C) a contact actuating arm pivotally connected to the upper ends of the uprights, said arm extending downwardly toward the base;

(D) a contact at the lower end of the arm;

(E) a contact carried by the base in contactable position with the first mentioned contact;

(F) and a heating element juxtaposed with and in heat exchange relationship with Vone of said uprights;

(G) and means for xing the lower ends of the uprights with one another.

2. A time delay circuit controller, comprising in combination:

(A) a base;

(B) a plurality of uprights carried by the base;

(l) said uprights each having transverse notches,

said notches confronting one another;

(C) a contact actuating arm having beads lying Within said notches, said uprights being biased toward one lnother, said arm extending downwardly toward the ase;

(D) a contact at the lower end of the arm;

(E) a contact carried by the base in contactable position with the first mentioned contact;

(F) and a heating element juxtaposed with and in heat exchange relationship with one of said uprights;

(G) and means for fixing the lower ends of the uprights'with one another.

3. A time delay controller as defined in claim 1, characterized to include:

(G) and an L-shaped brace having one leg thereof connected with the other of said uprights throughout substantially the entire length `thereof and having the other leg fixed to said one upright.

4. A time delay controller as defined in claim 2, characterized to include:

(G) and an L-shaped brace having one leg thereof connected with the other of said uprights throughout substantially the entire length thereof and having the other leg fixed to said one upright.

5. A` time delay controller as defined in claim 1, characterized to include:

(G) means adjacent the upper ends of the uprights for preventing movement of said uprights away from one another.

6. A time delay controller as defined in claim S, characterized in that said means comprises a clip having shoulders engage the uprights.

7. A time delay controller as defined in claim 5, characterized in ythat s-aid means comprises a clip encircling and embracing the uprights.

8. A time delay controller as defined in claim 4, characterized to include:

(H) means adjacent the upper ends of the uprights for preventing movement of said uprights away from one another.

9. A time delay controller -as defined in claim 4, characterized to include:

(H) a clip encircling and embracing the upper ends of the uprights.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,022,917 12/1935 Larkin et al 308-2 Xl 2,256,318 9/1941 Hadley 308-2 2,396,462 3/ 1946 Grace et al 308-2 X 2,817,731 12/1957 DeFlaco 20G-122 2,928,918 3/1960 Payne 200-122 l3,038,049 6/ 1962 Fritts 200--122 3,129,306 4/1964 Perkins et al 20G-122 BERNARD A. GILHEANY, Primary Examiner.

L. A. WRIGHT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2022917 *May 15, 1933Dec 3, 1935Michell Crankless Engines CorpBearing
US2256318 *Nov 27, 1939Sep 16, 1941Fairbanks Morse & CoBearing structure
US2396462 *Jun 12, 1943Mar 12, 1946Int Standard Electric CorpMounting jewels for instrument bearings
US2817731 *Oct 26, 1955Dec 24, 1957Falcon Electronics CorpTime delay control device
US2928918 *Feb 20, 1957Mar 15, 1960Payne Harold ESnap action switch
US3038049 *Aug 15, 1957Jun 5, 1962Minnesota Mining & MfgRelay
US3129306 *Aug 1, 1960Apr 14, 1964Thermal Controls IncThermal time-delay relay
Referenced by
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US6080350 *May 29, 1998Jun 27, 2000Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Blending a functionalized polymer and a hydrophilic channeling agent, reacting, blending silica gel disiccant into polymeric reaction product, solidifying the desiccant agent entrained polymer-channeling agent, forming the shaped article
US6124006 *May 29, 1998Sep 26, 2000Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Modified polymer having channels which act as controlled transmission passages through polymer; packaging materials which provide controlled environment
US6130263 *Mar 5, 1997Oct 10, 2000Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Desiccant entrained polymer
US6174952Sep 18, 1998Jan 16, 2001Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Water soluble polymer, dessicating agent and hydrophilic agent
US6194079Sep 18, 1998Feb 27, 2001Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Blend of polymer, hydrophilic agent and absorbent material; heating
US6214255Jul 27, 1998Apr 10, 2001Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Desiccant entrained polymer
US6221446May 29, 1998Apr 24, 2001Capitol Specialty Plastics, IncModified polymers having controlled transmission rates
US6316520Sep 18, 1998Nov 13, 2001Capitol Specialty Plastics, Inc.Useful in producing containers and packaging for items requiring controlled environments
US6460271Dec 13, 2000Oct 8, 2002Csp Technologies, Inc.Insert having interconnecting channel morphology for aldehyde absorption
US6465532Jul 28, 2000Oct 15, 2002Csp Tecnologies, Inc.Semicrystalline and amorphous polymers, such as thermo-plastics and polyethers, and particles; forming shaped articles such as plug type inserts and liners for closed containers or films, sheets, beads or pellets
US6486231Feb 14, 2000Nov 26, 2002Csp Technologies, Inc.Co-continuous interconnecting channel morphology composition
US6696002Jul 28, 2000Feb 24, 2004Capitol Security Plastics, Inc.Co-continuous interconnecting channel morphology polymer having modified surface properties
US7314895Mar 5, 2004Jan 1, 2008Csp Technologies, Inc.Alkali/alkaline earth metal carbonates; films, sheets, inserts liners for packages containing humidity; for cut apples, lettuce, flowers, and baked goods
US8221705Dec 17, 2008Jul 17, 2012Gen-Probe, IncorporatedReceptacles for storing substances in different physical states
USRE40941 *Nov 13, 2003Oct 20, 2009Csp Technologies, Inc.Polymer having interconnecting channels which act as controlled transmission passages through the polymer; hydrophilic agent is blended into the polymer so that it is distributed within the polymer; useful in the manufacture of containers and packaging for items requiring controlled environments
Classifications
U.S. Classification337/127, 337/139, 337/141
International ClassificationH01H61/02, H01H43/00, H01H61/00, H01H43/30
Cooperative ClassificationH01H43/302, H01H61/02
European ClassificationH01H43/30B2, H01H61/02