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Publication numberUS3256654 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1966
Filing dateApr 26, 1962
Priority dateApr 26, 1962
Publication numberUS 3256654 A, US 3256654A, US-A-3256654, US3256654 A, US3256654A
InventorsPinckney Jr Eustace B
Original AssigneePinckney Jr Eustace B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soffit supporting fitting
US 3256654 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21, 1966 B. PINCKNEY, JR 3,256,654

SOFFIT SUPPORTING FITTING Filed April 26, 1962 FIG. 1.

FIG. 4.

EUSTACE a. PINOKNEYJR ATTORNEYS Patented June 21, 1966 3,256,654 SOFFIT SUPPORTING FITTING Eustace It. Pinclkney, In, 644 E. 44th St, Savannah, Ga. Filed Apr. 26, 1962, Ser. No. 190,319 4 Claims. (Cl. 5295) This invention relates to building construction.

More particularly this invention relates to a building construction component for supporting and connecting sofiits, and for simultaneously providing means for ventilating the areas being enclosed by said soffits.

It is a common modern day construction practice to employ sofi'its to cover or enclose the underside of the eaves of the modern day homes, and other buildings, wherein the eaves of the roof extend beyond and hang over the outside walls of the building. The purpose of such soffits is to hide the rafters or the eaves from view from the ground, and to thus give the building a more finished appearance and, further, to prevent the use of the underside of the eaves as a nesting place for insects, birds, and the like. In ordinary practice, the soffit material frequently consists of plywood, or hardboard, or other forms of composition board, all of which are ordinarily obtained in sheets or panels sufiicient in size so that one piece will extend from the location of the frieze board, on the side of the building, to the facia board, which is located at the extreme or free ends of the rafters.

In the more common instance, the soffit is installed in a horizontal plane, with one edge resting upon the upper surface of the frieze'board and the other edge residing within a slot formed on the inwardly facing surface of the facia board. However, on some occasions the sofiit is installed on or close to the underside of the rafters, and assumes the slanting position defined by those surfaces.

In the last mentioned instance the ends of the soffit can be nailed directly to the underside of the rafters and, if necessary, the panel can also be further braced by being nailed to one or more rafters at a point intermediate its ends. However, in instances where the rafters are slanted, but it is desired to install the soffit in a horizontal plane, it is necessary to first install horizontally extending bracing members, called lookouts, which extend between, and are fixed to the wall and the end portion of the rafters, and to then secure the sofiit to these lookouts.

Now in many areas, climatical conditions or building codes, or other considerations, require that the area enclosed with the soffit material be'provided with means of ventilation, and it has been a practice in the past to cut holes in the soffit material and then screen the opening, and/or fill the opening with suitable ventilating fixtures which allow the entry of air but will nevertheless prevent the entry of the insects or birds as discussed above.

One of the problems frequently encountered in the use of the soifit material in extended sheet form is the difficulty in orienting the ventilating apertures (which are usually cut and fitted prior to the installation of the soffit) so as to avoid having them coincide with the placement of the lookouts. In like manner, in instances where it is desired to cut the ventilating apertures, or to add additional ventilating apertures, after the soflit has been installed, there is always the problem of knowing where to cut such an aperture and still avoid an encounter with a lookout.

Another problem which is encountered with the common techniques for installing sofiits stems from the fact that the sheet material employed is frequently inexactly sized, whereby there is a considerable amount of cutting and wastage involved in fitting the panels so that an end corresponds to the position of the lookout or rafter, as the case may be.

It is an object of this invention to provide a soffit supporting fitting which will adequately brace and support the sofiit and thereby obviate the need for the use of lookouts.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a soffit supporting fitting which will provide a means for ventilating the areas enclosed by the soffit, and will obviate the need for cutting and fitting ventilating apertures in the sofiit itself, and will obviate the problems stemming therefrom as outlined hereinabove.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a soffit supporting fitting which will utilize the full length of soffit material, and will thereby obviate the expense involved in cutting the soffits as aforesaid, and will prevent the wastage of soflit material which results therefrom.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a means for fulfilling each of the above listed objects which is neat and attractive when installed and yet performs its intended function with greater efiiciency than will the alternate means heretofore available.

Finally, it is the object of this invention to provide means which will fulfill all of the above mentioned objects at such a reasonable cost as to provide substantial savings in labor and material expense in the con-.

struction of buildings employing soffits.

These and other objects of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of a typical preferred form and application of the invention, throughout which description reference will be made to the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view, partially in section, of a sofiit installed on a building.

FIGURE 2 is a plan view taken in partial section along line '2-2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view partially in section taken along lines 33 of FIGURES 1 and 2.

FIGURE 4 is an elevational view partially in section taken along lines 4-4 of FIGURE 3.

Referring to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, a conventional soffit panel 10 has one edge resting upon the upper surface of the frieze board 12, which is fixed on the outer wall 14 of a building. The other edge of the soffit 10 extends into a slot 16 which has been formed in the inwardly facing surface of the facia board 18 which is, in turn, nailed or otherwise fixed to the free ends of the rafters 2t].

As is shown in FIGURE 2, a soffit supporting fitting formed, constructed, and used in accordance with this invention is located between the ends 24 of the soffit panels. It extends from the frieze board 12 to the facia board 18, and has one end resting upon the upper surface of the frieze board, and the other end deposed within the slot 16.

In the preferred embodiment, the soffit supporting fitting is formed of a sheet material of a metallic substance such as aluminum, steel, galvanized iron or copper, although it is equally within the contemplation that the same could be formed of a plastic or cellulostic derivitive products.

As is best understood from a consideration of FIG- URES 2, 3 and 4, the illustrated preferred embodiment of the soffit supporting fitting is pressed and formed from a single sheet of metal and may, for purposes of description, be considered to have two edge portions, generally designated at 28, for receiving the ends 24 of the soflit material 10, and a central portion, generally designated at 30, which is formed with apertures to provide ventilation to the areas being enclosed by the sofiits and the soffit supporting fitting.

In the preferred embodiment shown the apertures comprise openings 32, formed by stamping downwardly disposed hooded louvers 34, said openings being covered by suitable screen 36, such as a wire screen having a No. 8

or smaller mesh opening. It should be understood, however, that in many applications the provision of the hooded louvers may be dispensed with, and that the ventilating openings may merely consist of apertures stamped in the sheet material and then covered by a screen. In any event, it is preferred that the ventilating apertures in the central portion of the panel be so dimensioned as to occupy up to approximately 40% of that area.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated the edge portions of the sofiit supporting fittings are defined by doubling the metal back upon itself, as at 40, and then forming the same to extend upwardly, as at 42, a distance commensurate with the thickness of the sofiit material being employed, and then outwardly, as at 44, towards the edge of the fitting, the end result being the formation of a longitudinally extending channel 46 to receive and grip the end portions 24 of the respective soffit panels 10.

As a matter of convenience in installation it has been found helpful to turn the free ends of the sheet material upwardly so as to provide a camming surface 48 to guide the end of the soflit material into the channel 46 that has been thus defined.

As best shown in FIGURE 3, when the soffit supporting fitting is installed in its final position the spaced ends 24 of neigboring panels of soffit material 10 extend into the channel 46 and the soffits are supported by the legs of channels which extend under their ends 24.

As best shown in FIGURE 2, the sofiit supporting fitting is cut to have a length which is identical with the width of the sofiit panels, and has one end extending over the upper surface of the frieze board 12 and has the other end fitted into the slot 16 in the facia board 18. Thus the sofiit supporting fitting and its neighboring soffits are substantially flush with one another, and present a smooth and finished appearance when viewed from below. Of course, if it is desired, the sofiit supporting fixture can be installed in an inverted position which serves to break, or contrast with, the otherwise smooth facade of the sofiits, and thus creates a decorative effect which might be preferred with some styles of architecture.

After the soffits, together with their supporting fittings, have been installed it may be desirable to install a nailer board 50 to bear down upon those portions of the sofiit, and their supporting fittings, which are resting upon the frieze board 12 so as to prevent the assembly from rattling in high winds, or being otherwise moved from their intended positions. If the fitting is inverted, as described hereinabove, the nailer 50 would, of course, have to be cut to conform with its configuration. The nailer is shown in FIGURE 1, but, for purposes of clarity, has been omitted from FIGURE 2.

It should be understood that the width of the central portion 30 of the panel, and hence the amount of ventilation which is obtained thereby, can be varied to suit the numerous variables that may be encountered in practice, including, by way of example, variances in local climatical conditions, and variance in the spacing between the sofiit supporting fittings as may be dictated by details of design of the building in question.

It should be further understood that it is entirely within the contemplation of this invention to vary from the precise configurations shown hereinabove in the matter of the attachment of the edges of the soffit supporting fitting to the soffit, and that the preferred embodiment discussed hereinabove is merely presented for purposes of illustrating the invention.

Consequently, I wish to make it explicit that having described only a typical preferred form and application of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details set herein, but wish to reserve to myself any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in the art and falling within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a building having sofiits extending from the exterior wall thereof to an area adjacent the ends of the rafters, the improvement comprising an elongated sofiit supporting fitting extending between the wall and the outside-edge of the soffit, said fitting comprising edge portions having edge means receiving and supporting the ends of the soffit panels, and a central portion having apertures therein for supplying ventilation to the areas being enclosed by the soffits and the fitting, each of said edge means comprising an elongated channel extending from one end of the fitting to the other, said channel comprising one leg having a planar surface substantially aligned with the central portion of the fitting, and a second leg spaced from the first leg by a distance sufficient to allow the end of the corresponding sofiit panel to extend t-hereinbetween, and a channel base extending between the first leg and the second leg, one of said legs operating as a support for the ends of the soffit panels to keep the edge of the soffit from sagging.

2. In a building having soffits extending from the exterior wall thereof to an area adjacent the ends of the rafters, the improvement comprising an elongated sofiit supporting fitting extending between the wall and the outside edge of the soffit, said fitting comprising edge portions having edge means receiving and supporting the ends of the sofiit panels, and a central portion having apertures therein for supplying ventilation to the areas being enclosed by the soffits and the fitting, each of said edge means comprising an elongated channel extending from one end of the fitting to the other, said channel comprising one leg having a planar surface substantially aligned with the central portion of the fitting, and a second leg spaced from the first leg by a distance sufiicient to allow the end of the corresponding soifit panel to extend thereinbetween, and a channel base extending between the first leg and the second leg, one of said legs operating as a support for the ends of the sofiit panels, said fitting being formed of sheet material.

3. In a building having sofiits extending from the exterior wall thereof to an area adjacent the ends of the rafters, the improvement comprising an elongated sofiit supporting fitting extending between the wall and the outside edge of the sofiit, said fitting comprising edge por tions having edge means receiving and supporting the ends of the sofiit panels, and a central portion having apertures therein for supplying ventilation to the areas being enclosed by the sofiits and the fitting, each of said edge means comprising an elongated channel extending from one end of the fitting to the other, said channel comprising one leg having a planar surface substantially aligned with the central portion of the fitting, and a second leg spaced from the first leg by a distance sufficient to allow the end of the corresponding sofiit panel to extend thereinbetween, and a channel base extending between the first leg and the second leg, one of said legs operating as a support for the ends of the sofiit panels, said fitting being formed of sheet metal, one of said legs being formed by bending the metal back on itself, and then bending the bight of the metal away from that leg, and then parallel to that leg, to define said channel.

4. In a building having soffits extending from the exterior wall thereof to an area adjacent the ends of the rafters, the improvement comprising an elongated soffit supporting fitting extending between the wall and the outside edge of the soffit, said fitting comprising edge portions having edge means receiving and supporting the ends of the sofiit panels, and a central portion having apertures therein for supplying ventilation to the areas being enclosed by the sofiits and the fitting, each of said edge means comprising an elongated channel extending from one end of the fitting to the other, said channel comprising one leg having a planar surface substantially aligned with the central portion of the fitting, and a second leg spaced from the first leg by a distance sufficient to allow the end of the corresponding sofiit. panel to extend thereinbetween, and a channel base extending between the first leg and the second leg, one of said legs operating as a support for the ends of the sofiit panels, said fitting being formed of sheet metal, one of said legs being formed by bending the metal back on itself, and then bending the bight of the metal away from that leg, and then parallel to that leg, to define said channel, the free edge of the metal being further bent to extend away from the mouth of the channel, and thus present a camming surface to facilitate the fitting of the sofiit panel into the channel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 2,255,725 9/1941 Trescher l8978 2,379,179 6/ 1945 Petersen 52285 2,643,710 6/1953 Sylvan 16090 2,741,001 4/1956 De Martin 5276 2,780,978 2/ 1957 Pierson 9837 2,991,709 7/1961 Haddix 160-90 3,051,071 8/1962 Leigh 9837 3,125,942 3/ 1964 Smith 98-37 OTHER REFERENCES American Builder, October 1956, page 244.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

HENRY C. SUTHERLAND, JACOB NACK-ENOFF,

RICHARD W. COOKE, JR., Examiners.

M. O. WARNECKE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3343323 *Apr 12, 1965Sep 26, 1967Mayfield Cornelius AWooden siding vent
US3777649 *Mar 31, 1972Dec 11, 1973Luckey WFrieze vent
US3826048 *Aug 17, 1972Jul 30, 1974Aluminum Co Of AmericaCombined gutter, fascia, soffit arrangement
US4007672 *Jun 23, 1975Feb 15, 1977Luckey William ARafter vent
US4126973 *May 17, 1976Nov 28, 1978Luckey William ARafter vent
US4219977 *Jun 23, 1978Sep 2, 1980Country Log Homes, Inc.Log building construction
US4550648 *Jul 11, 1983Nov 5, 1985Eagle Jon RAttic ventilation system
US4580374 *Jan 31, 1983Apr 8, 1986Quinnell Geoffrey CSoffit and fascia system
US5560157 *Sep 14, 1994Oct 1, 1996Rotter; Martin J.Fascia vent
US6145255 *Aug 25, 1999Nov 14, 2000Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaSoffit vent
US6679010 *Jan 4, 2002Jan 20, 2004Nichiha CorporationOverhanging member
US7107726 *Sep 30, 1998Sep 19, 2006International Building ConceptsOrganic I-beam soffit
US7137224Feb 16, 2004Nov 21, 2006Quality Edge, Inc.Vented soffit panel and method for buildings and like
US7823339 *May 2, 2003Nov 2, 2010Huber Jr Edmund BurkeWeep hole screen
US8176691Nov 24, 2008May 15, 2012Quality Edge, Inc.Beaded soffit panel for buildings
DE3328935A1 *Jan 31, 1983Jan 12, 1984 Title not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/95, 52/208, 454/260
International ClassificationE04D13/15, E04D13/152
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/152
European ClassificationE04D13/152