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Publication numberUS3257027 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1966
Filing dateSep 12, 1962
Priority dateSep 12, 1962
Publication numberUS 3257027 A, US 3257027A, US-A-3257027, US3257027 A, US3257027A
InventorsWeiss Arthur J
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double wall separator for bottle carriers
US 3257027 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21, 1966 A. J. WEISS DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 12, 1962 T 49 SOfBS 4 INVENTOR.

AIZTHUE 3. W955 gmvs ATTO

June 21, 1966 A. J. WEISS DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 12, 1962 1| B INVENTOR.

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DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS 7 Sheets-Sheet .3

Filed Sept. 12, 1962 IBI INVEN TOR.

ARTHUR J W955 BY ATTOIZN EYS June 21, 1966 A. J. WEISS 3,257,027

DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS Filed Sept. 12, 1962 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 zaz m6 an 218 r 4 f l I 22 22c we r 1!? j 3 2: 207 220 m2 v 223 222 2:3 103 22c 222 em 22 3 mo w? ma m4 m3 me INVENTOR.

Az-ruue J. lass v a J WW '21, m AT QMEYs INV EN TOR 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Asz-n-wlz J WEJSS A. J. WEISS DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS H W" llm 235 234 June 21, 1966 Filed Sept. 12, 1962 June 21, 1966 A. J. WEISS DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed Sept. 12, 1962 243 INVENTOR AETHUE 3. WE \55 BY 4QM, M M

United States Patent 3,257,027 DOUBLE WALL SEPARATOR FOR BOTTLE CARRIERS Arthur J. Weiss, Bergenfield, N .J., assignor to Continental Can Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Sept. 12, 1962, Ser. No. 223,589 6 Claims. (Cl. 220-115) This application is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 31,691, entitled Double Wall Separator for Bottle Carriers, filed May 25, 1960.

This invention relates in general to new and useful improvements in the bottle carrier art, and more particularly relates to new and useful bottle separators which may be positioned within a wrap-around bottle carrier for both separating the bottles disposed within the carrier and preventing the accidental removal of the bottles through the ends of the carrier.

A bottle carrier, in order to function properly, must not only properly support the bottles to facilitate the carrying thereof, but must also prevent contact of adjacent bottles so as to prevent damage to the bottles during handling. A basic commercially acceptable type of bottle carrier includes a carton blank, usually made of paperboard and the like, which may be placed around a desired number of bottles with two ends of the blank engaged beneath the bottoms of the bottles with the necks of the bottles passing through suitable openings in the top portion of the carton to form a carrier. The means by which the said two ends of the blank may be thus engaged is shown in my prior US. Patent No. 2,990,997. The carrier also includes a suitable type of separator for positioning within the carrier to prevent the contact of the bottles with each other. In this basic type of carrier arrangement, it is desired that the carrier be placed on the bottles as they move along a conveyor line. It is also desirable that the separator be first placed with respect to the bottles, after which the blank of the carrier is wrapped around both the bottles and the separator to form the complete package. It will thus be apparent that it is desirable that the bottle separator be separate and independent from the carrier in its initial state. It is to this type of separator that the present invention relates.

In viewof the foregoing, it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel bottle separator for use with a wrap-around type of bottle carrier, the bottle separator being readily formed from a one-piece blank which is folded along its longitudinal center line to provide two halves which are identical, and the two halves having projecting portions which project from opposite sides of the central part of the separator in transverse alignment and serve to both separate bottles when combined with the bottles in a bottle carrier, and to prevent the accidental removal of the bottles from the ends of the bottle carrier.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel bottle separator for use with a wrap-around carrier, the separator being readily formed from a single sheet of material and being provided with projecting flanges on opposite sides of the main portion thereof, intermediate ones of the flanges beng adapted to be disposed between adjacent bottles to prevent engagement of the bottles, and endmost ones of the flanges being in the form of stops for preventing the accidental movement of the bottles out of the ends of the carrier.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel double wall separator for use in bottle carriers of the open end wrap-around type, the separator including two upstanding walls having flanges projecting transversely thereto at the opposite ends thereof, the flanges functioning as stops to prevent the accidental removal of bottles out of the end of the bottle carrier, and the central portion of the walls having a plurality of flanges struck therefrom, the flanges being folded to positions normal to the planes of the walls and arranged in pairs for positioning between adjacent bottles to prevent engagement of the bottles with one another.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel bottle separator for positioning within a wrap-around type of a bottle carrier, the bottle separator including a pair of vertical wall portions from which a plurality of flanges 'have been struck and folded out of the planes ofthe walls, the flanges being arranged in cooperating pairs, and each of the walls having at least four flanges struck therefrom, the endmost ones of the flanges being generally rectangular in outline, and the centralmost flanges being formed of overlapping material of the walls, one of the intermediate flanges being generally C-shaped and the other being generally T-shaped, with the stern portion of the T-shaped flange being received within the C-shaped flange in the initial formation of the blank from whch the separator is folded.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel separator for use in conjunction with a wrap-around type of bottle carrier, the bottle separator including two upstanding walls which are formed from a single sheet of'material connected together along their bottoms by a fold line, the ends and intermediate portions of the walls being spaced apart by means of spacers which project between the walls at the bottoms thereof, the spacers being disposed'at the ends and intermediate points of the walls, and being formed from the material of the walls, so as to provide individual pockets into which bottles may be seated. 7

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel bottle separator which is of a double wall construction, and which is formed from a single sheet of material, the two walls of the bottle separator being disposed in face-to-face relation and terminating at their ends in end flanges, the end flanges at each of the wall ends combining to have a configuration generally corresponding to the cross-section of the wrap-around carrier in which the bottle separator is positioned to prevent the accidental removal of bottles from the ends of the carrier, and the end flanges being provided with projecting tabs which project through slots in the carrier to interlock the end flanges with the carrier, the walls also having struck and folded therefrom intermediate flanges which are adapted to be positioned between adjacent bottles to separatethe same.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel bottle separator of the double wall type wherein the two walls of the bottle separator are disposed in touching opposed relation, and each of the walls terminates at each end thereof in an end flange which is disposed substantially normal to the plane of its respective wall, the individual end flange having formed integrally therewith a return flange and a securing flange, which securing flange is suitably secured to the adjacent portion of the respective wall to prevent the swinging of the end Yet another object of the invention is to provide a novel bottle separator for use with an open end wrap-around type of bottle carrier, the bottle separator being formed from an elongated blank which is folded along a longitudinal center line to define two halves which are identical,

each of the halves including a plurality of wall portions which are separated by outwardly projecting spacers formed by intermediate portions of the blank folded upon themselves, and the separator having end flanges which are disposed at the ends of the separator and project outwardly with respect to the terminal wall portions, the end flanges having rebent portions and securing flanges which are fixedly secured to the terminal wall portions to limit the swinging of the end flanges away from the respective wall portions beyond positions generally normal to the wall portions.

It has been found that when certain products are bot fled and are exposed to light, the quality of the products diminishes. A typical example of such a product is certain types of beers, especially when the beer is packaged in the presently popular throw-away bottles which do not have the same imperviousness to light as the previous darker bottles. It is, therefore, a further and important object of this invention to provide a novel bottle separator for use with an open end wrap-around type of bottle carrier wherein the bottles are substantially entirely enclosed against light so as to prevent the deterioration of the product packaged therein.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel bottle separator for use in combination with a wraparound type of carrier for separating the bottles within the' carrier, the bottle separator being provided with end flaps or panels which substantially close off the ends of the carrier, which ends have heretofore been opened, to thus both seal the ends of the carrier against the entrance of light which would be harmful to the products packaged within the carrier, and at the same time to retain the endmost bottles within the carrier against accidental movement.

With the above, and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claims, and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a bottle carrier incorporating one form of bottle separator in accordance with the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the bottle separator removed from the bottle carrier to show the general'details thereof.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view, taken along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 1, and shows the general arrangement and components of the bottle separator, bottles being shown in position within the bottle carrier to indicate the function of the bottle separator.

FIGURE 4 is a plan view on a reduced scale of the blank fro-m which the bottle separator is formed.

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of another bottle carrier, which bottle carrier utilizes the carton of FIG- URE 1, but is provided with a [modified form of bottle separator.

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of the bottle separator of FIGURE 5 removed from the carrier.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view, taken along the line 77 of FIGURE 5, and shows the specific horizontal cross-section of the bottle separator, there also being illustrated bottles within the carrier to show the relationship of the bottle separator with respect to the bottles.

FIGURE 8 is a plan view of the blank from which the bottle separator of FIGURE 6 is' formed.

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of another bottle carrier incorporating a modified form of bottle separator.

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view of the bottle separator of FIGURE 9 removed from the carrier.

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged fragmentaryelevational view showing the details of construction of the handle portion of the separator.

FIGURE 12 is a horizontal sectional view, taken along the line 1212 of FIGURE 9 and shows the horizontal cross-section of the bottle separator, there also being illustrated bottles in the carrier and the relationship of the bottles with'respect to the separator.

FIGURE 13 is a plan view of the blank from which the bottle separator of FIGURE 10 is formed.

FIGURE 14 is a perspective of another form of bottle carrier incorporating another form of bottle separator.

FIGURE 15 is a perspective view of the bottle separator of the bottle carrier of FIGURE 14.

FIGURE 16 is a horizontal sectional view, taken along the line 16-16 of FIGURE 14, and shows the horizontal cross-section of the bottle separator, there also being illustrated bottles in position within the carrier and separated by the bottle separator.

FIGURE 17 is a plan view on a reduced scale of the blank from which the bottle separator of FIGURE 15 is formed.

FIGURE 18 is a perspective view of a still further form of carrier incorporating yet another form of bottle separator.

FIGURE 19 is a perspective view of the bottle separator used in the carrier of FIGURE 18.

FIGURE 20 is a horizontal sectional view taken through the bottle carrier of FIGURE 18, along the line 2020 and shows the horizontal cross-section of the bottle separator, there also being shown bottles in place and the relationship of such bottles with respect to the bottle carrier.

FIGURE 21 is a plan view of the blank from which the'bottle separator of FIGURE 19 is formed.

FIGURE 22 is a perspective view with portions broken away showing the details of another form of bottle carrier wherein the opposite ends of the bottle carrier are com pletely closed by the bottle separator.

FIGURE 23 is an enlarged longitudinal vertical sectional view taken along the line 2323 of FIGURE 22 and shows more specifically the relationship of the bottle separator with respect to the bottle carrier, one of the bottles being shown in position in phantom lines.

FIGURE 24 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken along the line 24-24 of FIGURE 23 and shows additiona1 details of the bottle carrier.

vFIGURE 25 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 2525 of FIGURE 23 and shows the specific relationship of the bottle carrier, the bottle separator and two endmost bottles which are generally shown in phantom lines.

FIGURE 26 is a perspective view rotated from the position of FIGURE 22 of the bottle separator per se.

FIGURE 27 is a plan view of the blank from which the bottle separator of FIGURE 26 is formed.

Reference is first made to the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 4, inclusive, of the drawings. The bottle carrier illustrated in FIG- URE l with the separator therein is generally referred to by the numeral 25, and is particularly designed for carrying six bottles B. The bottles have been omitted from FIGURE 1 for purposes of clarity, although they are illustrated in section in FIGURE 3. The bottle carrier 25 is formed of two basic components. These include a cartom 26, which extends around the lower portions of the bottles B, and a bottle separator 27, which is disposed within the carton 26 for separating and retaining bottles in position therein.

The carton 26 is not new per se. It is shown in prior Patent No. 2,441,134. It does, however, cooperate with the bottle separator which is hereinafter fully described. Accordingly, the carrier 26 will not be fully described herein.

The carton 26 is formed from a single elongated blank which is folded to define an upper portion 28 having two rows of openings 29 formed therein for the reception of necks of bottles B. The upper portion 28 is also provided'with an elongated slot 30 through which a handle portion, to be described in detail hereinafter, passes. The carton 26 also includes a bottom portion 31 which is formed by overlapping flaps 32 and 33, the flaps 32 and 33 being suitably secured together. The preferred securing means for the flaps 32 and 33 is a plurality of tabs (not shown), with each of the tabs underlying and being in alignment with a pair of bottles so that the bottles serve to hold the tabs in place.

As is best shown in -FIGURE 1, the bottle separator 27 is vertically disposed within the confines of the carton 26 and serves to prevent contact of the bottles B (see FIGURE 3) with each other, thus preventing damage to the individual bottles. The bottle separator 27 also serves to prevent the accidental removal of the bottles from the bottle carrier 25.

Reference is now made to FIGURE 4, wherein the details of a blank, generally referred to by the numeral 34, from which the bottle separator 27 is formed, are illustrated. The blank 34 is generally rectangular in outline and is formed of a suitable economical material, such as paperboard and the like. longitudinal fold line 3-5 for dividing the blank 34 into two identical halves. Each of the halves .of the blank 34 is provided adjacent each of its ends with a transverse fold line 36 which divides the blank half into a pair of end flanges 37 and a central wall portion 38. The end flanges of the two blank halves are separated by slits 39 which constitute extensions of the fold line 35. Each of the fold lines 36 is interrupted by a central, generally C- shaped cut line 40 which defines an inner tab 41 on each of the end flanges 37. The blank 34 is also shaped to define a projecting tab 42 on the free edge of each of the end flanges '37.

Each of the wall portions 38 has an upwardly projecting central portion defining a handle 43. The handle 43 has a generally C-shaped cut line 44 formed therein defining a hand opening. The out line 44 also defines a fiap 45 which is connected to the remainder of the handle 43 along a fold line 46.

The central part of each wall or wall portion 38 is provided with suitable cut lines to define a pair of outer flanges 47, 48 and a pair of central flanges 49, 50. The flange 47 is generally rectangular in outline, and is defined by a generally C-shaped cut line 51. The flange 47 is hingedly connected to the wall 38 along a transverse fold line 52. The flange .48 is similar to the flange 47 and is defined by a generally C-shaped cut line 53. The flange 48 is hingedly connected to the wall 38 along a transverse fold line 54.

The flange 49 is of a generally T -shape, and is defined by a out line 55. The flange 49 is in what may be considered a horizontal position in that a stern portion 56 thereof extends horizontally and a cross portion 57 thereof extends vertically. The cross portion 57 of the flange 49 is hingedly connected to the wall 38 along a transverse fold line 58. The fold lines 52 and '58 are disposed on opposite sides of a narrow post-like portion 60 of the wall 38.

The flange 50 is of a generally Cshape, and is defined by a out line 61 which cooperates with the .cut line '55. It is to be noted that the stem portion 56 of the flange 49 is received in and is complementary to the correspond- .ing portion 0 fthe C-shaped flange 50 so that there is no loss of material and at the same time, the over-all widths of the flanges 49 and '50 may be a maximum, considering the spacing provided. The flange 50 is hingedly connected to the body 38 along a fold line 62 which extends transversely of the blank and which is parallel to the fold line 54. The fold lines 54 and '62 are separated by a narrow post-like portion 63.

In the formation of the bottle separator 27 from the blank 34, the blank 34 is folded along the fold line 35 while the end flanges 37 are being pivoted to positions The blank 34 has a central effect of light on the contents of the bottles.

generally normal to the planes of the walls 38. As the bottle separator 27 is being assembled, the tab 41 of one of the end'flanges 37 passes through the opening in the end of the wall to which an associated end flange 37 is connected. At the same time, the tab 41 of the associated end flange is disposed outwardly of the first-mentioned end flange. The arrangement of the end flanges 37 and their tabs 41 is best illustrated in FIGURE 3. It is to be noted that while the tabs 41 are offset, the end flanges 37 are in alignment. The tabs 41 thus reinforce the end flanges 37 and serve to assist in the retaining of the end flanges in alignment and transversely of the planes of the walls.38.

When the handle portions 43 are brought together, the flaps 45 thereof are swung upwardly to horizontal positions, thus leaving the hand hole opening 64. The handle portions 43 combine to define a handle, which is generally referred to by the numeral 65,

It is to be noted that the flanges 47, 48, 49 and 50 of each of the walls 38 project from one side of their respective wall and that respective ones of the flanges are in transverse alignment. This is best illustrated in FIGURE 3. The flange 47 cooperates With-the flange 49 and the flange 48 cooperates with the flange 50, each pair of flanges defining a bottle spacer. 1

In the use of the bottle carrier 25, the bottle separator 27 serves to prevent adjacent ones of the bottles B from contacting each other and prevents the accidental movement of the endmost ones of the bottles out of the carton 26. The separator 27 also serves to restrict the entrance of light into the ends of the carton 26 so as to reduce the At the same time, the handle 65 of the bottle separator 27 projects up throgh the slot 30 to facilitate the carrying of the bottle carrier 25.

In assembling the bottle carrier 25 and six bottles B, the bottles B move along a conveyor in double tows. The bottle separator 27, as it appears in FIGURE 2, is positioned with respect to six of the bottles. This may be done automatically. After the bottle separator 27 has been positioned, the carton 26 is passed down over the bottles B in alignment with one of the bottle separators 27 and with the necks of the bottles B passing through the openings 29. The bottle carton 26 is folded under the bottoms of the bottles, and the flaps 32 and 33 are secured together to complete the package. The entire package may now be handled by using the handle '65.

The tabs 42, as is illustrated in FIGURES, may form extensions of the end flanges 37. In certain instances, they may be omitted. In other instances, they may be of suflicient length to extend through slots (not shown) which may be formed in the upstanding walls of'the carton 26 to interlock the end flanges 37 with the carton. Since the end flanges 37 also serve to prevent the accidental removal of the endmost bottles from the bottle carrier 25, it will be obvious that they function as stops and sufficient rigiditythereof is desirable.

Reference is now made to FIGURES 5 through 8, inelusive, of the drawings, wherein there is illustrated a bottle carrier generally referred to by the numeral 70. The.

bottle carrier 70 includes the carton 26 and a bottle separator, generally referred to by the numeral 71. The bottle separator 71 is formed from a blank, generally referred to by the numeral 72, the blank 72 being best illus trated in FIGURE 8.

The blank 72 is formed of a single sheet of material which is generally rectangular in outline, the material being an economical one, such as paperboard and the like. The blank 72 is divided into two halves by a central fold line 73, the fold line 73 being interrupted in a manner to be described in detail hereinafter. The two halves of the blank 72 are identical, and each half includes a wall 74 which has projecting upwardly therefrom a handle portion 75. The handle portion 75 is provided with a central, generally C-shaped cut-out 76, and a flap 77 defined by the cut-out 76, the flap 77 being hingedly connected to the handle portion 75 along a fold line 78.

It is intended that the walls 74 be pivoted into upstanding opposed relation, with the walls being connected at their bottoms along the fold line 73. However, it is desired that end portions of the walls 74 be spaced apart. Accordingly, each end of the fold line 73 terminates in a generally triangular spreader 80 which is connected to the wall 74 along converging fold lines 81, the fold lines 81 converging at their intersection with the fold line 73. The fold line 73 is also interrupted by intermediate pairs of spreaders 82. The spreaders 82 of each pair are separated by a transverse cut line 83, and are defined by converging fold lines 84 which converge at their intersection with the fold line 73. Thus, when the walls 74 are folded to upstanding, generally parallel positions, the end portions of the walls 74 will be spaced apart by the spreaders 80 and the intermediate portions of the walls will be spaced apart at their bottoms by the spreaders 82.

When the bottle separator 71 is formed from the blank 72, the handle portions 75 are brought together in opposed relation, and the flaps 77 are swung upwardly to horizontal positions, with the handle portions 75 combining to define a handle 85 and the cut-outs 76 defining a hand hole 86. The flaps 47, which are generally horizontally disposed, form part of the grip of the handle 85.

Each of the walls 74 also has struck therefrom flanges 87, 88, 89 and 90. The flanges 87 and 88 are disposed outermost, Whereas the flanges 89 and 90 are centrally located. Each of the flanges 87 and 88 is of a rectangular configuration, and the flange 87 is defined by a generally C-shaped cut line 91. The flange 87 is hingedly connected to its respective wall 74 along a fold line 92 which extends transversely of the fold line 73.

The flange 88 is defined by a C-shaped cut line 93 and, like the flange 87, is connected to its respective wall 74 along a transverse fold line 94. It will thus be apparent that the flanges 87 and 88 differ only in that they are left and right, as compared to each other.

The flange 89 is generally C-shaped, and is defined by an irregular out line 95. The flange 89 is hingedly connected to its respective wall 74 along a transverse fold line 96, the fold line 96 being parallel to the fold line 92 and being separated therefrom by a narrow post-like portion 97 of the respective wall 74.

The flange 90 is generally T-shaped in outline and is generally horizontally disposed, the flange 90 including a generally horizontal stem portion 98 and a generally vertical cross-bar 100. The flange 90 is defined by a cut line 101 which cooperates with the out line 95. be noted that the stern portion 98 of the flange 90 is received within the C-shaped flange 89 and that the flanges 89 and 90 are complementary. In this manner, the flanges 89 and 90 may have a maximum effective width for the space available for the forming of the flanges. The flange 90 is connected to its respective wall 70 along a fold line 102 which is disposed parallel to the fold line 94 and is separated therefrom by a narrow post-like portion 103.

When the bottle separator 71 is formed, all of the flanges of one of the walls 74 are folded in one direction, and all of the flanges of the other of the walls are folded in the opposite direction. This is best shown in FIGURE 7. Corresponding ones of the flanges are in alignment with each other, and the flange 87 cooperates with the flange 89 to define a first bottle spacer, while the flange 88 cooperates with the flange 90 to define a second bottle spacer.

As is best shown in FIGURE 7, the spreaders 80 and 82 function to spread apart the ends and intermediate portions of the bottle separator 71, thus defining a plurality of pockets in which the individual bottles B may be received. The spread ends of the walls 74 prevent the accidental removal of the bottles through the open ends of the carton 26. The bottle spacers defined by the flanges 87,

It is to 88, 89 and cooperate with the spread apart intermediate portion of the walls 74 to prevent engagement of adjacent bottles with one another.

In assembling the bottle carrier 70, the bottles B pass along a conveyor in two aligned rows. The bottle separator 71 is positioned with respect to six of the bottles along the line of bottles, after which the carton 26 is moved down over the tops of the bottles, with the necks of the bottles passing through the openings 29. The lower portion of the carton 26 is then folded beneath the bottoms of the bottles, and the flaps 32 and 33 interlocked together. As the carton 26 is moved down over the bottles and the bottle separator 71, the handle 85 passes upwardly through the slot 30 in the jacket, and thus projects above the carton 26 to facilitate the carrying of the bottle carrier 70 loaded with the bottles B.

The bottle carrier illustrated in FIGURES 9 through 13, inclusive, is generally referred to by the numeral 110. The bottle carrier is composed of the carton 26 and a bottle separator, generally referred to by the numeral 111. The bottle separator 111 is formed from a blank, generally referred to by the numeral 112 and illustrated in FIGURE 13.

The blank 112 is cut from a generally rectangular sheet of inexpensive material, such as paperboard. The blank has a central fold line 113 dividing the blank into two identical halves. A fold line 114 extends transversely to the fold line 113 at each end thereof, and divides each half of the blank 112 into a pair of end flanges 115 and a central wall portion 116. The fold line 114 across each of the blank halves 112 is interrupted by a generally C-shaped out line 117 which defines an inner tab 118.

When in the blank state, the adjacent end flanges 115 of the two blank halves have diverging edges 120. Also, each end flange 115 has an upwardly and outwardly sloping edge 121 remote from its respective wall portion or wall 116. The end flange 121 also includes an upwardly and inwardly sloping upper edge 122. The combined cross-sections of two of the end flanges 115 correspond generally to the end cross-section of the carton 26 and substantially close the open ends of the carton 26 so as to prevent the entrance of light thereto, which light may' be harmful to the products within the bottles. Each end flange 115 also has a projecting tab 123 which projects from the edge 121 thereof for a purpose to be described in .detail hereinafter.

The upper part of each wall 116 terminates in a short cut line 124 extending inwardly from opposite ends thereof. The portion of the wall 116 intermediate the cut lines 124 is integrally connected to a handle-forming portion 125. The handle-forming portion 125 has a central cut line 126 defining a flap 127 which is hingedly connected to the handle-forming portion 125 along a fold line 128.

A pair of L-shaped reinforcing members 129 are hingedly connected to opposite ends of the handle-forming portion 125 along fold lines 130 which are disposed generally normal to the fold line 113. These reinforcing portions 129 are foldable into overlying relation with respect to the handle-forming portion 125 and are generally adhesively secured thereto.

Each of the walls 116 is provided with four flanges 131, 132, 133 and 134. The flanges 131 and 134 are disposed outermost and are generally rectangular in outline. The flange 131 is defined by a cut line 135 and is hingedly connected to the wall 116 along a fold line 136 disposed normal to the fold line 113. The flange 134 is defined by a out line 137 and is hingedly connected to the wall 116 along a fold line 138 which is parallel to the fold line 136.

The flange 132 is generally T-shaped in outline and is horizontally disposed. The flange 132 is defined by a cut line 142 and is hingedly connected to the wall 116 along a fold line 143 which is parallel to the fold line 136. The fold lines 136 and 143 are separated by narrow post-like portions 144 of the wall 116.

The flange 113 is generally C-shaped in outline and is complemental to the flange 132. The flange 133 is defined by an irregular cut line 145 which, in part, follows the cut line 142. The flange 133 is hingedly connected to the wall 116 along a fold line 146 which is parallel to the fold line 138. The fold lines 146 and 138 are spaced apart with the portion of the wall 116 therebetween being in the form of a post-like portion 147.

The assembled bottle separator 111 is illustrated in FIGURE 10. It is to be noted that the walls 116 are disposed in face-to-face engagement and that the end flanges 115 at the opposite ends of the Walls 116 are disposed in alignment. The tabs 118 of the end flanges 115 overlap the adjacent end flange to reinforce the same. As is best shown in FIGURE 12, the innermost one of the tabs 118 passes through the openings from which the tabs are cut. The tabs 118 are offset from each other, whereas the end flanges 115 lie generally in the same plane.

The flanges 131, 132, 133 and 134 of each wall 116 are folded outwardly from the plane of the wall in the same direction, with the flanges of one Wall extending in an opposite direction from the flanges of the other wall, and the flanges of the two walls being in alignment. The flange 131.cooperates with the flange 132 to form a first bottle spacer, and the flange 133 cooperates with the flange 134 to form a second bottle spacer, there being two bottle spacers on each side of the two walls 116.

When the bottle separator 111 is formed, the handleforming portions 125 are in face-to-face relation, and combine to define a handle, generally referred to by the numeral 140. When the flaps 127 are swung upwardly, the cut-outs 126 define a hand hole 141, and the flaps form part of the grip portion of the handle 140.

In forming a package utilizing thebottle carrier 110, bottles B move along a conveyor in two lines. An erected bottle separator 111 is slipped down over its associated six bottles in the relationship shown in FIGURE 12. This may be automatically done. After this has been accomplished, the open carton 26 in slipped down over the necks of the bottles B with the necks passing through the openings 29 in the carton. At the same time, the handle 140 passes upwardly through the slot 30 in the carton 26. The lower portion of the carton 26 is wrapped around the bottoms of the bottles, and the flaps 32 and 33 thereof suitably secured together.

At the same time, it is pointed out that the vertical portions of the carton 26 are provided with slots 69 adjacent each end thereof, the slots 29 extending vertically. When the carton 26 is assembled over the bottles B and the bottle separator 111, the slots 69 receive the tabs 123 to interlock the bottle separator 111 with the carton 26. The interlocking of the end flanges 115 with the carton resists the deformation of the end flanges 115 and thus resists the accidental removal of a bottle through an end of the bottle carrier 110. The end flanges 115 substantially close the open ends of the carton 26 and serve to greatly restrict the light that may enter into the ends of the carton, thereby excluding much light which could be harmful to the contents of the bottles.

A bottle carrier, generally referred to 'by the numeral 150, is illustrated in FIGURES 14 through 17, inclusive. The bottle carrier 150 includes a carton 26 and a bottle separator which is generally referred to by the numeral 151. The bottle separator 151 is formed from a generally rectangular blank, which is generally referred to by the numeral 152, the blank 152 being formed of relatively inexpensive material, such as paperboard, for example.

The blank 152 is divided into two identical halves by a longitudinali central fold line 153 which is continued at its ends bya pair of cut lines 154. A pair of fold lines 155 extends transversely of the fold line 153, and intersects the same at its ends. The fold lines 155 divide each half of the blank 152 into a central wall or wall portion 156 and outer portions, each of which is generally referred to by the numeral 157.

Each of the outer portions 157 is divided into an end flange 158, a return flange 159, a diagonal flange and a securing flange 161. The flanges 158 and 159 are separated by a fold line 163. The flanges 159 and 160 are separated by a fold line 164, and the flanges 160 and 161 are separated by a fold line 165.

As is best illustrated in FIGURE 16, when the blank 152 is folded to form the bottle separator 151, the flange 158 becomes the end flange, and the return flange 159 slopes inwardly towards the respective Wall 156. The securing flange 161 is secured to the wall 156 in face-toface engagement, and the diagonal flange 160 extends diagonally between the flanges 159 and 161. The arrangement of the flanges 158, 159, 160 and 161 is such they may be readily folded towards the respective wall 156 so that the'bottle separator 151 may be folded to a relatively flat state. On the other hand, the relationship of the aforementioned flanges is such that movement of the flange 158 beyond a position normal to its respective wall 156 is prevented.

In the form of the invention illustrated, the fold line 163 is interrupted by a generally C-shaped cut 166 which has a portion thereof extending along the fold line 164. The C-shaped cut 166 defines a tab 167 which is removed from the flange 159 and remains as an extension of the flange 158 when the blank 152 is folded to form the bottle separator 151. It will be apparent that in the open state of the bottle separator 151, the tab 167 forms an extension of the flange 158 and assists the flange 158 in retaining bottles within the carton 26. However, under most conditions, the flange 158 will be of a sufficient width to retain the 'bottles in place within the carton 26 and, when desired, the tab 167 may be eliminated and the material of the tab remains a part of the flange 159. The flanges 159 extend across a major portion of the open ends of the carton 26 and thus greatly reduce the amount of light which may pass into the ends of the carton 26 and react with the products in the endmost bottles to diminish the quality thereof.

A handle-defining portion 168 extends upwardly from the central part of the wall 156 remote from the fold line 153. The handle-forming portion 168 has a generally C-shaped cut-out 169 which defines a flap 170. A pair of inverted L-shaped reinforcing members 171 are connected to the opposite ends of the handle-forming portion -168 along fold lines 172 which are disposed normal to the fold line 153. Lower parts of the reinforcing members 171 are separated from the wall 156 along cu-t lines 173. When the bottle separator 151 is being formed from the blank 152, the reinforcing members 171 are folded into overlying relation with respect to their respective handle-forming portion 168 and are suitably adhesively secured thereto.

In the completed bottle carrier 150, the two handleforming portions 168 are disposed in face-to-face engagement and, together with the reinforcing members 171, define a handle 174. In the formation of the handle, the flaps are pushed through their cut-outs to define a hand hole 175, and the flaps 170 swing upwardly to form a part of the grip of the handle 174.

The central part of each of the walls 156 has struck therefrom a plurality of flanges. These flanges include two rectangular terminal flanges 176 and'177, and two central flanges which include a C-shaped flange 178 and a T-shaped flange 180. The flange 176 is defined by a cut line 1 81 and is hingedly connected to its respective Wall 156 along a fold line .182. The flange 177 is defined by a C-shaped cut line 183 and is hingedly connected to its respective Wall 156 along a fold line 184. The flange 178 is defined by an irregular out line 185 and is hingedly connected to its respective wall 156 along a fold line 186. The fold lines 182 and 186 are in closely spaced parallel relation, with the portion of the wall 156 disposed therebetween being in the form of a narrow post-like portion 187. The flange 180 is complemental to the flange 178, and is, in part, defined by the cut line 185 and in part defined by a out line 188. The flange 180 is hingedly connected to its respective wall 156 along a fold line 189 which is disposed parallel to the fold line 184 and is separated therefrom by a narrow post-like portion 190 of the respective wall 156.

When the bottle separator 151 is formed from the blank 152, all of the flanges 176, 177, 178 and 180 of each wall 156 are folded in the same direction therefrom, with like flanges of the two walls being in transverse alignment, as is best shown in FIGURE 16. The flanges 176 and 178 combine to define a first bottle spacer, and the flanges 177 and 180 combine to define a second bottle spacer.

The bottles B to be packaged within the bottle carrier .150 are supplied along an endless conveyor in two rows and properly spaced for disposition within the bottle carrier 150. The bottle separator 151, as it appears in FIGURE 15, is positioned with respect to six of the bottles B, in the position best illustrated in FIGURE 16. This may be automatically accomplished. Then, the carton 26 in its open state is moved downwardly over the bottle separator 151 and the bottles B, with the handle 174 of the bottle separator 151 passing through the narrow slot 30 in the top portion of the carton 26, and the bottles B having their neck portions passing through the openings 29 in the top portion of the carton 26. The carton 26 is then wrapped around the lower portions of the bottles B, and the flaps 32 and 33 of the carton are passed beneath the bottles B and suitably secured together to form the bottom wall 31 of the carton 26. The securing means for the flaps 32 and 33 may be any desired, although interlocking tabs are preferred.

In the assembled bottle carrier 150, as is best illustrated in FIGURE 16, the bottle separator 151 serves both to separate adjacent bottles within the carton 26, and to prevent the accidental removal of the bottles'through the ends of the carton 26. Thus, the bottle carrier 150 suitably restrains movement of the bottles B to facilitate the ready handling of the bottles B without worry of breakage of one of the bottles. Further, the bottle car-rier 150 provides for an effective sealing of the bottles disposed therein against undue exposure to light which causes a diminishing of the quality of the contents of the bottles in certain instances.

In FIGURES 18 through 21, inclusive, still another form of bottle carrier is illustrated, the bottle carrier being generally referred to by the numeral 200. The bottle carrier 200 is formed of the'carton 26 and a bottle separator which is generally referred to by the numeral 201. The bottle separator 2011 is formed from an elongated rectangular blank 202, which blank is formed of a relatively inexpensive material, for example, paperboard.

The blank 202 is divided into two identical halves by a plurality of cut lines and fold lines which are alternated and are in alignment. These include endmost cut lines 203 which terminate at their inner ends in two outer fold lines 204. A central fold line 205 is disposed along the central portion of the blank 202. The fold lines 204 and 205 are separated by cut lines 206.

A pair of transverse fold lines 207 extends from the intersections of the cut lines 203 and the fold lines 204 and divide the blank halves into end portions and central portions. Disposed immediately inwardly of the fold lines-207 are outer wall portions 208 which are further defined by fold lines 210 which extend transversely of the blank 202 from the intersections of the fold lines 204 and the cut lines 206. A central wall portion 211 extends coextensive with the fold line 205 land is defined by a pair of fold lines 212.

A pair of flanges 213 and 214 is disposed coextensive with each of the cut lines 206. The flanges 213 and 214 of each pair are separated by a transverse fold line 215.

Each end portion of the blank halves is divided by fold the numeral 227. The bottle separator 227 is disposed lines to include an end flange 216, a return flange 217, and a securing flange 218. The flanges 216 and 217 are separated by a transverse fold line 220, and the flanges 217 and 218 are separated by a transverse fold line 221. The fold line 220 is interrupted by a generally C-shaped cut line 222 which extends partially across the flange 217 and defines a tab integral with the flange 216. v

When the bottle separator 201 is formed from the blank 202, the flange 216 is folded normal to the general plane of the bottle separator, the flange 217 is reversely folded, and the flange 218 is folded parallel to the general plane of the bottle separator and secured to the wall portion 208. The tab 223, being integral with the flange 216, projects outwardly from the flange 216, as is best shown in FIGURE 19. At this time, it is pointed out that, if desired, the tab 223 may be eliminated. Further,

if desired, an additional flange may be disposed intermediate the flanges 217 and 218, the flange corresponding to the flange of the bottle separator 151 and being disposed diagonally between the flanges 217 and 218 in the formed bottle separator.

The bottle separator 201 has the wall portions 208 and 211 in coplanar relation with the wall portions of the two halves in face-to-face engagement. The pairs of flanges 213 are reversely folded on themselves and extend transversely to the wall portions 208 and 211, the wall portion 211 being disposed closely adjacent its respective wall portions 208. Thus, the folded flanges 213, 314 project outwardly from the wall portions to define bottle spacers.

As is best illustrated in FIGURE 20, in the completed package, individual bottles B are spaced apart by the folded flanges 213, 214'in a longitudinal direction, and by the wall portions 208,211 in a transverse direction. The flanges 216, 217 and 218 combine to define stop means at the ends of the bottle carrier to prevent the accidental movement of the bottles out of the ends of the carton 26. The flanges 216 substantially close the ends of the carton 26 and exclude much light from entering into the same so as to diminish the effect of light on the contents of the bottles.

When the package of FIGURE 20 is formed, the bottles B are supplied in two rows in spaced relation. The bottle separator 201 is positioned with respect to six of the bottles in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 20. This may be automatically accomplished. The carton 26 is then moved down over the bottles B, with the necks of the bottles extending through the openings 29 in the upper portion of the carton 26. The carton 26 is then folded down around the lower portions of the bottles and the flaps 32 and 33 are passed beneath the bottles to form the bottom wall 31 of the carton 25. The flaps 32 and 33 are suitably connected together, such as by interconnected tabs (not shown).

It is to be noted that the bottle separator 201 is not formed with a handle. Accordingly, a separate handle 224 of any desired design is carried by the carton 26. The handle 224' projects upwardly through the slot. 30 in the top portion of the carton 26.

Reference is now made to the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 22 through 27 inclusive, of the drawings. The bottle carrier illustrated in FIG- URE 22 is generally referred to by the numeral 225 and, like the previously described bottle carriers, is particularly designed for carrying six bottles. The bottle carrier 225 is formed of two basic components, which include a carton, generally referred to by the numeral 226, and a bottle separator, which is generally referred to by entirely within the carton 226 and serves the triple purpose of separating adjacent bottles within the carton, preventing the outward displacement of the endmost ones of the bottles through the normally open ends of the carton, and restricting the entrance of light into the carton, whereby the contents of the bottles will not be exposed to an undesired amount of light which would result in the 13 deterioration of the quality of certain contents bottles.

The carton 226 differs slightly from the carton 26 of the other forms of the invention. However, the carton 226 is formed from a single elongated blank which is folded to define a centrally located top wall portion 228, a pair of downwardly sloping outer top wall portions 229 disposed on opposite sides of the central top wall portion 228, a pairof vertically disposed side walls 230, and a pair of downwardly and inwardly sloping lower wall portion. 231. The carton 226 includes a bottom portion 232 which is defined by a pair of overlapping flaps 233 and 234 which are connected together by a plurality of tabs 235, as is generally shown in FIGURE 25. The carton 226 is of a conventional construction and need not be described in further detail.

Reference is now made to FIGURE 27 wherein the details of the blank from which the bottle separator 227 is formed are illustrated, the blank being formed from a single sheet of paperboard and being generally referred to by the numeral 236. The blank 236 is of an elongated rectangular configuration and includes a central portion 237 which is set off by a pair of fold lines 238. On opposite sides of the central portion 237 there are disposed flaps 239 which are, in part, defined by the fold lines 238 and, in part, by fold lines 240. The fold lines 240 also serve to set off at the ends of the blank 236 a pair of flaps 241. The blank 236 is notched along opposite edges thereof in alignment with the fold lines 240, as at 242. The notches 242, together with the removal of material at the corners of the blank 236, as at 243, result in the flaps 241 having a cross-section which corresponds to the cross-section of the carton 226,

The central portion 237 of the blank 236 has an upper part thereof removed to define a pair of finger receiving recesses 244 which are aligned with finger receiving openings 244 formed in the central top wall portion 228 to facilitate the gripping and carrying of the bottle carrier 225. Also, the lower edge of the central portion 237 is provided with a plurailty of spaced notches 245 which are aligned with and provide clearance for the tabs 235.

The central portion 237 is provided with a pair of longitudinally extending cut lines 246 which terminate at the opposite ends thereof. Opposed transverse fold lines 247 with the fold lines of each pair offold lines 247 are being disposed in transversely spaced relation. The central portion 237 is further provided with cut lines 248 each of which extends both longitudinally and transversely of the central portion 237 and connects together the opposed inner ends of the fold lines 247 of each pair of fold lines.

of the The central part of the central portion 237 is provided with a generally zig-zag cut line 249 which extends between and intersects the cut lines 246. The cut lines 246, 248 and 249 together with the fold lines 247 define a pair of partition walls 250 and 251 which have complemental end portions and which are adapted to be folded out of the plane of the central portion 247 to extend transversely thereof and on opposite sides thereof, as is clearly shown in FIGURES 25 and 26.

When the blank 236 is erected to define the bottle separator 227, suitable adhesive is applied to the flaps 239 and to the adjacent halves of the flaps 241 and each flap 239 is brought into face-to-face engagement with the adjacent half of the associated flap 241. The adhesive is referred to by the numeral 252, and it is pointed out at this time that the adhesive need not be on both the flaps 239 and the flaps 241, but could be on either of the two flaps.

When the bottle separator 227 is fully erected ready to be inserted between a plurality of bottles B, the flaps 239 and 241 are disposed at right angles to the central portion 237 and the partition walls 250 and 251 are disposed parallel to the flaps 241. The bottle separator 227 thus defines six spaces for receiving bottles without the bottles coming into contact with one another.

In the use of the bottle carrier 225, the bottle separator 227 is first associated with six bottles B after which the carton 226 is wrapped around the group of bottles and the bottle separator 227 by first placing the central top wall portion 228 down over the necks of the bottles with the necks of the bottles passing through properly aligned openings 253 in the top wall portion 228. The carton 226 is then continued to be wrapped around the bottles with the flaps 233 and 234 being passed beneath the bottles and interlocked by means of tabs 235.

Since the flaps 241 have an outline corresponding to the cross-section of the carton 226, it will be seen that when the bottle carrier 225 is assembled, the normally open ends of the carton 226 are completely closed by the flaps 241 and light is thus excluded from the interior of the bottle carrier 225. This is highly beneficial in certain types of products being package, particularly some bottles of beer, which are affected by light. Thus, the flaps 241 not only serve to retain the endmost bottles within the carton 226, but also prevent the passage of harmful light rays into the interior of the carton 226.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that novel and advantageous provision has been made for carrying out the desiredend. However, attention is directed to the fact that other variations may be made in the example bottle separators disclosed herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A separator for use in a bottle carrier for separating individual bottles disposed therein, said separator being formed from sheet material and including an upstanding wall, said upstanding wall terminating in opposite ends thereof in outwardly directed end flanges disposed generally normal to the plane of the upstanding wall in the operative position of the separator within a bottle carrier, said end flanges defining end bottle stops, a plurality of pairs of intermediate flanges struck from said upstanding wall and directed outwardly from the plane thereof to form intermediate bottle spacers disposed generally norformed from sheet material and including an upstanding wall, said upstanding wall terminating in opposite ends thereof in outwardly directed end flanges disposed generally normal to the plane of the upstanding wall in the operative position of the separator within a bottle carrier,

said end flanges defining end bottle stops, a plurality of pairs of intermediate flanges struck'from said upstanding wall and directed outwardly from the plane thereof to form intermediate bottle spacers disposed generally normal to the plane of said upstanding wall, an intermediate flap connected to each end flange and an associated end of said upstanding wall, each intermediate flap being in face-to-face relationship to its respective end flange and secured thereto, said upstanding wall including top and bottom longitudinal edge portions, and at least a single notch formed in the top longitudinal edge portion of the upstanding wall to define an access area between a top panel of a bottle carrier with which the separator is associated to facilitate the gripping and carrying thereof.

3. A separator for use in a bottle carrier for separating individual bottles disposed therein, said separator being formed from sheet material and including an upstanding wall, said upstanding wall terminating in opposite ends thereof in outwardly directed end flanges disposed generally normal to the plane of the upstanding wall in the operative position of the separator within a bottle carrier, said end flanges defining end bottle stops, a plurality of pairs of intermediate flanges struck from said upstanding wall and directed outwardly from the plane thereof to form intermediate bottle spacers disposed generally normal to the plane of said upstanding wall, an intermediate flap connected to each end flange and an associated end of said upstanding wall, each intermediate flap being in faceto-face relationship to its respective end flange and secured thereto, said upstanding wall including top and bottom longitudinal edge portions, at least a single notch formed in said bottom longitudinal edge portion to provide clearance for latching means ofa bottle carrier with which the separator is associated, and at least a single notch formed in the top longitudinal edge portion of the upstanding wall to define an access area between a top panel of a bottle carrier with which the separator is associated to facilitate the gripping and tearing thereof.

4. A bottle carrier comprising a tubular carton having open ends and a separator disposed within said carton for maintaining bottles out of direct contact with one another and for generally closing the open ends of said carton, said carton including a top panel and a pair of closure panels opposite said top panel, at least one finger-receiving opening in said top panel, at least one latching member securing said pair of closure panels together, said bottle separator including an upstanding wall disposed along the longitudinal center line of said carton for positioning betweenv two rows of bottles, said upstanding wall including top and bottom longitudinal edge portions, said upstanding wall terminating at opposite ends thereof in outwardly directed end flanges disposed generally normal to the plane of said wall and the longitudinal center line of said carton, a plurality of pairs of intermediate flanges struck from said. upstanding wall and directed outwardly from the 'plane thereof to form intermediate bottle spacers disposed generally normal to the plane of said upstanding wall, an intermediate flap being secured in face-to-face relationship to an associated end flange, each end flange being joined to an associated end of said upstanding wall, at least a single notch formed in said bottom longitudinal edge portion to provide clearance for said one latching member of said carrier, and said one latching member being positioned beneath said notch whereby interference between said one latching member and said separator is precluded.

5. A bottle carrier comprising a tubular carton having open ends and a separator disposed within said carton for maintaining bottles out of direct contact with one another and for generally closing the open ends of said carton, said carton including a top panel and a pair of closure panels opposite said top panel, at least one finger receiving opening in said top panel, at least one latching member securing said pair of closure panels together, said bottle separator including an upstanding wall disposed along the longitudinal center line of said carton for positioning between two rows of bottles, said upstanding wall including top and bottom longitudinal edge portions, said up standing wall terminating at opposite ends thereof in outwardly directed end flanges disposed generally normal to the plane of said wall and the longitudinal center line of said carton, a plurality of pairs of intermediate flanges struck from said upstanding wall and directed outwardly from the plane thereof to form intermediate bottle spacers disposed generally normal to the plane of said upstanding wall, an intermediate flap being secured in face-to-face relationship to an associated end flange, each end flange being joined to an associated end of said upstanding wall, at least a single notch formed in the top longitudinal edge portion of the outstanding wall to define an access area between the top panel of the carton and the portion of the top longitudinal edge provided with the single notch, and the single notch being in generally aligned relationship with and opening toward said one finger-receiving opening of the top panel thereby facilitating the gripping and carrying of the bottle carrier.

6. A bottle carrier comprising a tubular carton having open ends and a separator disposed within said carton for maintaining bottles out of direct contact with one another and for generally closing the open ends of said carton, said carton including a top panel and a pair of closure panels opposite said top panel, at least one fingerreceiving opening in said top panel, at least one latching -member securing said pair of closure panels together,

said bottle separator including an upstanding wall disposed along the longitudinal center line of said carton for positioning between two rows of bottles, said upstanding wall including top and bottom longitudinal edge portions, said upstanding wall terminating at opposite ends thereof in outwardly directed end flanges disposed generally normal to the plane of said wall and the longitudinal center line of said carton, a plurality of pairs of intermediate flanges struck from said upstanding wall and directed outwardly from the plane thereof to form intermediate bottle spacers disposed generally normal to the plane of said upstanding wall, an intermediate flap being secured in face-to-face relationship to an associated end flange, each end flange being joined to an associated end of said upstanding wall, at least a single notch formed in said bottom longitudinal edge portion to provide clearance for said one latching member, said one latching member being located beneath said notch thereby preventing interference between said one latching member and said separator, at least another single notch being formed in the top longitudinal edge portion of the upstanding wall to define an access area between the top panel of the carrier and the portion of the longitudinal edge portion provided with said another notch, and said another notch opening toward and being generally in alignment with said one fingerreceiving opening, thereby facilitating the gripping and carrying of the carrier.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,975,240 10/ 1934 Verhoven 22915 X 2,413,315 12/1946 Darragh et a1 220115 X 2,593,092 4/1952 Bergstein 22915 X 2,899,051 8/1959 Barnby 206- 2,950,854 8/1960 Ganz 229- 40 2,993,618 7/1961 Kulig 229-40 X 3,016,182 1/1962 Chidsey 22940 3,029,999 4/ 1962 De Paul 22940 3,031,813 5/1962 Ganz. 3,064,871 11/1962 Wood 229--15 3,098,583 7/1963 Sherman 229-40 X 3,166,228 1/1965 Weiss 220-113 X FOREIGN PATENTS 193,808 10/ 1937 Switzerland.

GEORGE O. RALSTON, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3416653 *Nov 21, 1966Dec 17, 1968Reynolds Metals CoContainer means and method of making same and blanks for making such container means
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US7617969Nov 17, 2009Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton capable of carrying take-out food and beverages
US8061585Nov 22, 2011Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Reclosable cartons
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US20070000980 *Jun 30, 2005Jan 4, 2007Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton capable of carrying take-out food and beverages
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/200, 206/196, D09/753
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D71/06, B65D71/24, B65D71/28, B65D71/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/38, B65D2571/00154, B65D2571/00777, B65D71/285, B65D2571/00506, B65D2571/00419, B65D71/246, B65D2571/0066, B65D2571/00444, B65D2571/00277, B65D2571/0029
European ClassificationB65D71/28B, B65D71/24C, B65D71/38