Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3257101 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1966
Filing dateJun 1, 1965
Priority dateJun 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3257101 A, US 3257101A, US-A-3257101, US3257101 A, US3257101A
InventorsRanson Charles W
Original AssigneeRanson Charles W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fruit and vegetable washing device with vertical circulative flow and elongated inlet duct sections
US 3257101 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21, 1966 c. w. RANSON 3,

FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WASHING DEVICE WITH VERTICAL CIRGULATIVE FLOW AND ELONGATED INLET DUCT SECTIONS Original Filed Dec. 5, 1962.

United States Patent FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WASHING DEVICE WITH VERTICAL CIRCULATIVE FLOW AND ELON- GATED INLET DUCT SECTIONS Charles W. Ranson, 7906 Agnew Ave., Los Angeles, Calif.

Continuation of application Ser. No. 241,619, Dec. 3,

1962. This application June 1, 1965, Ser. No. 465,822 7 Claims. (Cl. 259-18) This is a continuation of application Serial No. 241,619, filed December 3, 1962, now abandoned. The present invention relates to a washing device for fruits, vegetables, and other solid food units. The device provides for imparting to contained liquid a two dimensional circulative flow in a vertical plane. Provision is included for the circulative liquid flow to receive sufficient kinetic energy from tangential inlet liquid flow to effect continuous vertical circulative motion of contained food units.

Objects of the invention are to provide for the thorough cleaning of all surfac areas of fruits and vegetables in minimum time and without bruises or damage.

Other objects are to provide a simple cleaning device having no moving mechanical parts, and which can be used conveniently in household kitchen sinks and which can utilize kinetic energy available from conventional household faucet Water.

Another object is to reduce the amount of faucet water pressure required for a faucet jet to start circulative motion of a given size static load of food units.

Another object is to reduce the amount of faucet water pressure required for a faucet jet to maintain continuous circulative motion of a given size load of food units.

Another object is to increase the washing load capacity of the device for a given faucet jet flow rate.

i A number of other objects and advantages will become apparent as the description proceeds. 1

One form of the present invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the views.

FIGURE 1 is a side view of the fruit and vegetable washing device properly positioned beneath an open water faucet. The arrows indicate the flow path of the circulative liquid flow.

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of FIGURE 1 showing the comparatively narrow width of the washing device.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary view of a portion of FIG- URE 1 showing a variation of the inlet unit.

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of FIGURE 3.

The washing of fruits and vegetables in the kitchen has heretofore been accomplished in practice by the use of a colander, a conventional kitchen pan, or by hand rubbing under an open faucet.

The colander is a bowl shaped sieve with a base. For food washing purposes the colander is held under an open faucet while containing a pile of food units. The bulk of the water follows the path of least resistance and flows around rather than through the pile of food units. The velocity of the water seeping between the food units is low due to resistance so that liquid scouring and dissolving action is relatively inefficient and slow. Also the food units lie static so that areas of mutual contact and areas of contact with the container receive no washing.

The conventional kitchen pan is generally used for washing by filling the bottom of the pan with food units and most of the remainder with water. The pan is then shaken by hand to simulate the action of a tumbling barrel. The cleaning action is highly erratic and inconsistent. Rinsing is only partial as the liquid is poured out. Bruises and surface damage can be done to berries and delicate skin fruits by the shifting weight of the total load.

3,Z5 7,l0l Patented June 21, 1966 The prior art has also provided a narrow width washing device of the type described herein. This device is described in my copending application of Serial No. 445,857, effective filing November 29, 1962. Said prior device while providing distinct improvements has been found to have limitations when used with a free liquid jet, as to the amount of food units which can be cleaned at one time. a

The present invention improves upon the prior art and provides advantages as set forth by the above statements of objectives.

Referring to the several figures, washing device 1 is comprised of side walls 2 and 3 extending longitudinally and vertically and spaced apart in relative proximity. A lateral wall 4 extends between side walls 2 and 3 to pro vide a bottom wall 4a and two opposite end walls 4b and 4c. The bottom wall 4a and end wall 412 are faired together by radius R to provide a curved inner surface as shown.

above point A, which is the point of tangency with radius R Point B indicates the lower point of tangency with radius R Other portions of lateral wall 4 are curved and faired as indicated by radius R and radius R The internal surface of lateral wall 4 provides a smooth, curved perimeterflow path for contained liquid.

Washing device 1 includes a liquid'inlet portion or unit 5, which clips to end wall 4b by notch 6 in the inlet unit. Inlet unit 5 includes an upper admission port 7, a normally submerged exit port 8, and an interconnecting substantially vertical duct portion 9.

For operation, the device is partially filled with fruits or vegetables or other food units and placed under an open faucet 10. Device 1 is positioned so the water jet enters port 7 of inlet portion or unit 5. The water may enter as a free jet, FIGURE 1, or as captive flow through a conduit. The water jet passes through inlet unit 5 and exits at port 8 entering the container portion of the washing device. The water jet enters adjacent to end wall 4b, passes tangent point A and is guided by the surface at R into a circulative path. The liquid is further directed into a circulative path by the surfaces at R and R as well as the curved surface R of the inlet unit. The establishedflow path is in accordance with the arrows shown in FIGURE 1. The liquid major exhaust occurs as overflow along the length of upper perimeter 12. Auxiliary exhaust ports 13 in bottom lateral wall 411 provide for the continuous exhausting of small liquid jets to remove small solid particles.

Washing device .1 contains liquid vertical-1y within a width W of relatively narrow proportions as shown in FIGURE 2. This lateral confinement provides for two dimensional liquid flow in a vertical plane. The circulative flow pattern is induced -by the tangential inlet jet and the curved inner surfaces of the lateral wall, FIGURE 1. Two dimensional confinement contributes greatly to liquid flow control and reduces dissipation of kinetic energy from lateral flow and turbulence.

As stated above, the side walls 2 and 3 are spaced apart in relative proximity or in the state of being mutually near. This proximity endows the device with a width smaller than the length or a width smaller than the height. The device has been found to be operable using conventional household faucets and a reasonable container volume when width W is about one half or less of the length or height of the device. As the width of the device is decreased with respect to the length or height, the efiicicncy and load capacity increases. When the width of the device is relatively large with respect to the length or height, the two dimensional flow pattern is not obtained, but localized random liquid agitation occurs at theregion The inner surface of end wall 4b extends vertically of faucet water entry. This results in erratic and negligible washing action.- Consequently, side walls 2 and 3 are spaced apart in relative proximity suitable for the establishment of two dimensional liquid flow. The specific proximity for satisfactory performance in any given installation depends upon the liquid mass flow rate, the height and length of the device, the internal contours of the device, the density and dimensions of the food units'to be washed, and the size of the wash load.

The kinetic energy of the inlet jet is conserved by the relatively large proportions of radii R R R and R and by the substantially two dimensional liquid flow pattern. The overflow liquid is of low velocity and low kinetic energy loss. Viscosity functions to maintain the entire liquid body in a state of circulative flow.

The two dimensional circulative liquid flow in a vertical plane imparts similar circulative motion to contained food units. The submerged food units are buoyed by forces equal to the weights of the displaced liquid. Consequently, only a relatively small amount of liquid drag force is required to lift a given food unit vertically against the gravity force. The drag force of a solid body in nonla minar liquid flow is proportioned to the relative velocity squared. Hence, by constructing washing device 1 as described, to conserve kinetic energy and to maintain high liquid r-otative velocity, the food units are forced to rise and circulate with the liquid. Food unit circulative washing has .been achieved using the water jet from conventional household faucets. It was found that the food units experience local tumbling as they move in general circulative flow. This tumbling action adds to the liquid scouring effect and to the cleaning by mutual attrition between food units.

During operation of the washing device, insecticides, fungicides, and other chemicals and soil particles are progressively removed from food units by a continuously diluting liquid flow. The impurities are carried away in the bulk liquid overflow along perimeter 12. The length of the perimeter is relativelylong to provide a small liquid overflow rate per unit length of weir. This reduces or prevents the loss overboard of food units as they circulate with the circulative liquid flow. Heavier non-soluble impurities are discharged through auxiliary exhaust ports 13 as the impurities are swept by liquid along the surface of side wall 4a. Ports13, by the removal of the liquid boundary layer, retard the formation of turbulence and improve efficiency by conserving kinetic energy of the main liquid circulative flow. When faucet 10 is closed, drainage occurs automatically through ports 13 permitting food units conveniently to be poured from spout 14 without liquid.

The present washing device is an improvement over my prior device, previously referenced, by a more efllcient configuration of inlet unit 5. Vertical duct portion 9 of inlet unit 5 tapers from a circular upper admission port 7 downwardly to a rectangular or otherwise elongated lower exit port 8. The major axis of elongated exit port 8 is arranged generally perpendicular to end wall 4b as shown in FIGURES l and 2. This con-figuration unexpected-1y achieves substantial improvements in critical free jet performance as compared to the symmetrical circular exit port of the referenced prior device. -It has been determined by controlled tests that the elongated exit port perpendicular to the end wall can circulate a larger load of food units for a given set of conditions. The elongated port results in a more effective transfer of inlet liquid energy to the contained liquid bulk. The inlet liquid flow pattern is more stable as a sheet of flow than as a circularly symmetrical flow. Turbulence losses are rduced. There is a more effective penetration by the elongated inlet liquid jet through the two dimensionally contained liquid, with a wedge-like action, to erode a food unit pile and overcome the static resistance of the food unit mass to circulative motion. The more eflicient inlet unit 9i thep esent device allows operation with lower faucet pressure than formerly. This is of particular advantage during those times of the day when the faucet water pressure may be low.

As an alternate configuration, the major axis of elongated exit port 8 is arranged parallel to end wall 4b as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. The optimum configuration, however, is with the major axis of elongated exit port 8 arranged substantially perpendicular to end wall 4b. This provides for maximum penetration by the inlet jet while preserving symmetrical flow conditions within the container.

In operation, inlet portion or unit 5 is placed approximately in line with faucet 10 to receive water jet 15. Anti-splash chamber 16 is provided with annular grooves 17 to deflect splashed inlet liquid, and to accommodate an extension conduit for direct faucet attachment, if desired,

As an option, inlet unit 5 includes a local honeycomb 18 at lower exit port 8. The vanes 19 of honeycomb 18 are vertical and parallel to the liquid flow direction, to reduce local liquid turbulence and provide more stable liquid flow.

Inlet unit or portion 5 may be separable from washing device 1 or the inlet portion may be bonded or otherwise integrally associated with the washing device within the scope of the invention. Similarly, the 'inlet portion or unit may be separable into sections which combine in use to perform as described.

The washing device rests on parallel skids 20 to provide elevation clearance for exhaust ports-13.

While one embodiment of the present invention has been illustrated it is to be understood that what is defined by Letters Patent is specified by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A washing device comprisingtwo side walls extending longitudinally and vertically and spaced apart in relative proximity, a lateral wall extending between said side walls to provide a bottom wall and two opposite end walls and connecting with said side Walls in unitary relation to provide a container cavity, and the inner surface of said bottom wall and the inner surface of at least one of said end walls substantially faired to provide a substantially curved inner surface at the region of juncture, and a liquid inlet portion normally positioned substantially above said curved inner surface, and said inlet portion including a substantially vertically extending duct portion having an upper admission port portion and a lower normally submerged exit port portion, and said exit port portion having an elongated duct transverse cross-section at the final discharge section thereof to provide a transversely elongated liquid jet in normal operation, and the major axis of said elongated final discharge transverse section of said exit port portion in plan view oriented substantially perpendicular to said end wall at the region of mutual proximity.

2. A washing device and liquid inlet portion as in claim 1, and said exit port portion having a liquid discharge direction substantially tangential to said curved inner surface.

3. A washing device and liquid inlet portion as in claim 1, and said inlet portion having a downwardly slanted lower surface to normally guide circulating liquid within said device in a curved path.

4. A washing device and liquid inlet portion as in claim 1, and said admission port portion of said duct portion having relatively enlarged transverse cross-sectional areas upwardly to provide an anti-splash chamber.

5. A washing device and liquid inlet portion as in claim 1, and said end wall cooperating with said vertically extending duct portion of said inlet portion to provide an integral duct.

6. A washing device comprising two side walls extending longitudinally and vertically and spaced apart in relative proximity, a lateral wall extending between said side walls to provide a bottom wall and two op posite end walls and connecting with said side walls in unitary relation to provide a container cavity, and the inner surface of said bottom wall and the inner surface of at least one of said end walls substantially faired to provide a substantially curved inner suface at the region of juncture, and said spaced side walls separated a distance less than one half of the largest single dimension of the container cavity in the direction of length or height, and a liquid inlet portion normally positioned substantially above said curved inner surface, and said inlet portion including a substantially vertically extending duct portion having an upper admission port portion and a lower normally submerged exit port portion, and said exit port portion having an elongated duct transverse cross-section at the final discharge section thereof to provide a transversely elongated liquid jet in normal operation, and the major axis of said elongated final discharge transverse section of said exit port portion in plan view oriented substantially perpendicular to said end wall at the region of mutual proximity.

7. A washing device comprising two side walls extending longitudinally and vertically and spaced apart, a lateral wall extending between said side walls to provide a bottom wall and two opposite end walls and connecting with said side walls in unitary relation to provide a container cavity, and the inner surface of said bottom wall and the inner surface of at least one of said end walls substantially faired to provide a substantially curved inner surface at the region of juncture, and a liquid inlet portion, said inlet portion including a substantially vertically extending duct portion having an upper admission port portion and a lower normally submerged exit port portion, and said exit port portion having an elongated duct transverse cross-section at the final discharge section thereof to provide a transversely elongated liquid jet in normal operation, and the major axis of said elongated final discha-rge transverse section of said exit port portion in plan view oriented substantially perpendicular to said end wall at the region of mutual proximity, and

said inlet duct portion positioned substantially above said curved inner surface and substantially within said container cavity and within upward projections of said side walls and end walls.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Ranson, U.S. application serial No. 445,857, filed March 29, 1965.

' CHARLES A. WI-LLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

ROBERT L. BLEUTGE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US552771 *Apr 1, 1895Jan 7, 1896 Walter w
US633066 *Sep 21, 1898Sep 12, 1899Elliot L BrewerLiquid-sterilizer.
US974336 *Jan 10, 1910Nov 1, 1910Arnold D AltApparatus for washing photographic prints.
US1383886 *Sep 25, 1919Jul 5, 1921Webb Sr Jean FWater-silencer
CH206355A * Title not available
FR1132640A * Title not available
IT614376B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3844586 *Feb 20, 1973Oct 29, 1974Selfix IncFaucet connector
US4848602 *Dec 23, 1986Jul 18, 1989Canon Kabushiki KaishaContainer with baffled outlet
US5085355 *May 31, 1989Feb 4, 1992Canon Kabushiki KaishaLiquid storage container preventing liquid backflow
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/165.2, 366/165.4, 141/339, 285/8, 134/198
International ClassificationA47J43/24, A47J43/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47J43/24
European ClassificationA47J43/24