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Publication numberUS3257792 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1966
Filing dateFeb 10, 1961
Priority dateFeb 10, 1961
Publication numberUS 3257792 A, US 3257792A, US-A-3257792, US3257792 A, US3257792A
InventorsJoy Robert F
Original AssigneeBethlehem Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wire sawing strand and method of making
US 3257792 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 28, 1966 R. F. JOY

WIRE SAWING STRAND AND METHOD OF MAKING Filed Feb. 10, 1961 2 a ask/v6 [N6 015 MHC'H/NE R O m V m Robe/*2 [Joy BY WW ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,257,792 WIRE SAWING STRAND AND METHOD OF MAKING Robert F. Joy, Bethlehem, Pa., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Bethlehem Steel Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 10, 1961, Ser. No. 88,364 7 Claims. (Cl. 57139) This invention relates to an improved wire sawing strand that is particularly useful for cutting blocks of granite, marble, slate, and other materials.

These strands are usually made by spirally twisting round or irregularly shaped strips whereby flutes or voids are provided to carry the abrasive material that actually does the cutting. customarily, the lay or twist of the strand is reversed at intervals by reversing the direction of rotation of the stranding machine.

An object of the invention-is to provide a multiple wire strand that has large abrasive carrying capacity.

Another object is to provide a strand that affords a large surface to initially contact the stone to be cut.

Another object is to provide an inexpensive and simple method of producing the saw strands.

Other objects will become apparent from the following specification and attached drawing which shows the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view illustrating a stranding machine and die set-up embodying the preferred method of producing a 2-wire saw strand;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged elevation view of a portion of the 2-wire saw strand, showing the strand before and after shaping according to my invention;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view along line 3-3 of FIGURE 2, of a 2-wire strand that has not been compressed;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view, along line 44 of FIGURE 2, of a 2-wire strand that has been compressed.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawing.

With reference to the drawing, FIGURE 1 illustrates a general diagrammatic arrangement of the equipment used to perform easily the objects of this invention as embodied in a two-wire strand. Two standard round wires 1 and 2 pass from the stranding machine 5, which twists the wires, through a closing die 6 to form a strand 7, a portion of which is shown in FIGURE 2. The strand is passed through straightener rollers 8 to equalize the inherent strains from the twisting operation and then passes through a round compression die 9 to form the strand 10, a portion of which is shown in FIGURE 2. Addition of compression die 9 is the only deviation from a normal stranding operation. FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view showing the general shape of the wires 1 and 2 after stranding but before passing through the compression die 9. In FIGURE 4, wires 1' and 2' are wires 1 and 2 respectively after they have been compressed. It will be seen that wires 1' and 2' have been flattened to a substantially elliptical shape and that their outer surfaces 11' and 12 have radii corresponding to the radius of the compression die 9 and larger than the radii of the original round wires 1 and 2. These larger outer surfaces afford more area of working contact when the strand is initially moved acrossa flat surface of stone and the improved strand will cut efficiently at the start of the sawing operation. It will be noted that the flutes or channels 13 and 14 between the wires are large relative to the working areas 11' and 12 and afford very good abrasive carrying qualities.

In order to form a two-wire saw strand of .25" diameter, the size used most commonly, I prefer to use ice a compression die having a diameter of approximately 93% the diameter of the 2-wire strand. However, the diameter of the die may vary between 88% and 98% of the diameter of the strand, depending upon the size and number of wires of saw strand desired.

As an example of my invention, two 0.135" diameter wires were spirally twisted to form a strand of 0.27" diameter. This strand was then compressed by a die to form a strand 'of cross-sectional shape shown in FIG- URE 4 and of 0.25" diameter, a reduction of approximately 7%. This saw strand was made with the lay or twist being reversed every 25 feet in length, and the lay length, the axial pitch or length of one twist, being about 0.9.

While I have described my invention as embodied in a two-wire strand, the invention is not to be considered as limited to that number of wires.

I claim:

1. A stone saw comprising two wires spirally twisted to form a strand, each of the wires being of substantially elliptical shape in cross-section with a major diameter and a minor diameter, two ends of said minor diameters of said wires being flattened and in contact with each other along the axis of said strand, each of the other ends of said minor diameters of said wires forming an outer surface of said strand, said outer .surfaces of each of said wires having a radius equal to the radius of the strand.

2. A stone sawing implement comprising a pair of wires twisted together, each of said wires being substantially ovaliform in cross section, with their major axes extending transverse to the longitudinal axis of the pair of wires, the inner peripheries being substantially flat and parallel to the said major axes, the peripheries adjacentthe inner peripheries defining substantial areas for the carrying of water and abrasives.

3. A stone sawing implement comprising two wires only, the wires being twisted together longitudinally to form a strand, each of said wires having at any cross section thereof a substantially ovaliform shape with its major axis parallel to the major axis of the other, the innermost peripheries of the wires being flat and touching each other throughout the length of each inner periphery, the outermost peripheries of said wires being arcuate and lying on the arc of a common circle, the diameter of said circle being smaller than the sum of two second diameters, each of the second diameters being the diameter of a wire of circular cross section having the same areas as each of said wires of the strand, and the transverse peripheries adjacent the inner peripheries defining a recess of substantial area for carrying water and abrasives.

4. A stone sawing implement comprising two wires only, the wires being twisted together longitudinally to form a strand, each of said wires having at any cross section thereof a substantially ovaliform shape with its major axis parallel to the major axis of the other, and its minor axis perpendicular to its major axis, the said ovaliform shape being symmetrical about its minor axis, the innermost peripheries of the wires being flat and touching each other throughout the length of each inner periphery, the outermost peripheries of said wires being arcuate and lying on the arc of a common circle, the diameter of said circle being smaller than the sum of two second diameters, each of the second diameters being the diameter of a wire of circular cross section having the same area as each of said wires of the strand, and the transverse peripheries adjacent the inner peripheries defining a recess of substantial area for carrying water and abrasives.

5. A wire stone sawing strand comprising two wires stranded together with relatively "deep spiral channels er length than said flat portions, the distance from the 10 bottom of each channel taken on a radius from said longitudinal axis to a circle including said circular outer portions being greater than the length of said fiat portions.

6. A method of producing a stone sawing implement comprising the steps of twisting together a pair of wires of circular cross section to form a strand, and then subjecting the twisted wires of the strand to a reshaping operation changing the cross 'sectional shape of each wire from a circular shape to a substantially ovaliform shape having the same cross sectional area with the major axes of the reshaped wires extending in parallel relation to each other across the longitudinal axis of the strand, the reshaped wires being contiguous with each other,-the

. outer peripheries of said reshaped wires forming cutting surfaces. 7

7. A method of producing a stone sawing implement comprising the steps of twisting together a pair of wires of circular cross section to form a strand, and then drawing the strand through a circular die, the diameter of which is less than the sum of the diameters of the wires of circular cross section to change the cross sectional shape of each wire from a circular shape to a substantially ovaliform shape having the same cross sectional area such that the major axes'of the reshaped wires extend in parallel relation to each other across the longitudinal axis of the strand, the reshaped wires being contiguous with each other, the outer peripheries of said reshaped wires forming cutting surfaces, the diameter of said die being such that substantial recessed areas spiralling between the wires are retained.

' References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 251,114 12/1881 Hallidie 205-162 2,156,652 5/1939 Harris 12521 2,856,914 10/1958 Dessureau 12521 2,876,761 3/1959 Stevens 12521 2,884,692 5/1959 Haase et al. 57-156 FOREIGN PATENTS 665,719 1 0/ 1938 Germany.

14,121 8/1891 Great Britain.

MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.

RUSSEL C. MADER, FRANK E. BAILEY, FRAN T. BURROUGH, Examiners.

I. E. PEELE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US251114 *Dec 20, 1881 Wire rope and cable
US2156652 *Mar 29, 1938May 2, 1939Callenders Cable & Const CoManufacture of wire strands
US2856914 *Jul 22, 1957Oct 21, 1958Dessureau John BStone sawing wire
US2876761 *Mar 1, 1957Mar 10, 1959United States Steel CorpHelicoidal stone-sawing wire
US2884692 *Jul 6, 1956May 5, 1959Ver Deutsche Metallwerke AgMethod of making a twisted wire welding element
DE665719C *Mar 21, 1936Oct 1, 1938Fernand PerrierZu einem Ring verspleisstes Kabel zum Zersaegen von Hartgestein o. dgl.
GB189114121A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3336784 *Nov 16, 1964Aug 22, 1967British Ropes LtdMethod of drawing wire rope
US3400494 *Sep 24, 1965Sep 10, 1968Russell SeitzApparatus for machining hard materials
US3786623 *Jul 24, 1972Jan 22, 1974Graenges Essem AbMethod and an apparatus for the continuous production of stranded wire
US4580545 *Feb 29, 1984Apr 8, 1986Florida Wire And Cable CompanyStone sawing strand
US4709699 *Aug 6, 1986Dec 1, 1987Fort Wayne Metals Research Products CorporationSurgeon's Gigli saw and method
US6260343Apr 28, 1999Jul 17, 2001Wire Rope Corporation Of America, IncorporatedHigh-strength, fatigue resistant strands and wire ropes
DE102012101251A1 *Feb 16, 2012Aug 22, 2013Schott Solar AgMethod for separating silicon wafer from each other by semiconductor material ingot using e.g. multi-wire saw, involves separating wafers from each other by relative movement between ingot and wire groups
EP0922519A2 *Dec 9, 1998Jun 16, 1999AbsalonMethod of cutting by geometrically and thermally and/or mechanically deforming a saw wire or saw blade, and sawing machine
WO2013076400A1 *Nov 12, 2012May 30, 2013SodetalMetal wire for saw
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/204, 57/311, 57/293, 125/21, 57/248, 72/274
International ClassificationB21F7/00, B23D61/00, B21C1/16, D07B7/00, B23D61/18, B21C1/02, B23D65/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21C1/16, D07B7/00, B21C1/02, B21F7/00, B23D65/00, B23D61/185
European ClassificationB21C1/16, B23D61/18B, D07B7/00, B21F7/00, B21C1/02, B23D65/00