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Publication numberUS3257829 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1966
Filing dateApr 4, 1962
Priority dateApr 8, 1961
Also published asDE1231385B
Publication numberUS 3257829 A, US 3257829A, US-A-3257829, US3257829 A, US3257829A
InventorsRichard Parthum
Original AssigneeSinger Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Yarn control means for circular knitting machines
US 3257829 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. PARTHUM June 28, 1966 YARN CONTROL MEANS FOR CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed April 4, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG-I.

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YARN CONTROL MEANS FOR CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Filed April 4, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG-l l.

INVENTOR: BY RICHARD PARTHUM ATT'YS.

United States Patent 3,257,829 YARN CONTRGL MEANS FOR CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES Richard Parthnm, Kgs. Lynghy, Denmark, assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Singer Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New Jersey Filed Apr. 4, 1962, Ser. No. 185,501

Claims priority, application Denmark, Apr. 8, 1961,

1,461/61; Sept. 12, 1961, 3,618/ 61; Jan. 27, 1962,

6 Claims. (Cl. 66-134) The present invention relates to mechanism for the guiding, severing and holding of disengaged yarns in a circular knitting machine having instrumentalities including a rotary needle cylinder carrying a circle of needles therein, a dial cap overlying said cylinder within said needle circle, a feed station for introducing yarn to and withdrawing yarn from said needle circle, a severing member mounted adjacent said needle circle for severing the yarns inserted and withdrawn by said feed station, and a suction means mounted to overlie said dial cap in the yarn path intermediate said severing member and said feed station to suck away the severed yarn ends.

Known arrangements for circular knitting machines of this kind either have no clamping member or they have periodically operating clamping members for seizing, tensioning or tightening yarns or threads to be severed. These known arrangements, however, are not entirely satisfactory. Without clamping members, the yarns 01' threads will not be tightened sufficiently for safe severing close to the knitted goods, such as stockings or similar knitwear. The periodically operating clamping members are provided with complicated and expensive means for the periodically moving of the clamping members, and frequently it is found that the yarns or threads accumulate at the clamping member and so create such disorder as to stop the sucking away of severed thread ends. Piled up or thick threads will be squeezed too hard and when severed whilst held between the clamping members will cause the latter to be pressed apart, with the consequence that following thin threads are often not seized and are not severed close to the knitted goods.

The object of the invention is to provide an arrangement whereby these drawbacks are obviated but which will have all the advantages of the known arrangements and, moreover, will be even more suitable for the purpose in question than the known arrangements, and that the same will be cheaper and more reliable than similar arrangements heretofore.

Mechanism in accordance with the present invention, for severing and holding and removal of disengaged yarns, is characterized in that for controlling the threads to be severed there is provided a rotatable clamping member and a cooperating fixed clamping member affording a clamp area engaging a limited portion of the surface of said rotatable clamping member, in combination with means forming a transition at the leading end of said area for directing the thread to the grip between the clamping members, said clamping members being disposed to intercept the thread path from said severing member to said feed station, the rotation of the needle circle carrying the thread into the grip of the clamping members thereby to hold the thread for severance by said severing member, and afterwards to release the severed thread'end in an opening at the trailing end of the clamp area whence the severed end is drawn into said suction conduit. Conveniently said clamping surface is annular and flat, and substantially parallel to the dial cap or disc and has a central bore communicating with said suction conduit.

By this arrangement, the threads or thread ends are not accumulated in the clamping members, severed threads, however, are safely and efiiciently, immediately after their Patented June 28, 1966 ice severing, sucked freely and separately hanging into the suction channel, and-totally severed thread ends are immediately after their severing sucked away through the suction channel. The tightening or clamping member works in such a manner that threads pass individually, continuously and uniformly through the same, and are safely clamped by it, and tightened or tensioned immediately before and during their severing, and it works continuously, and without special periodically operating guiding and clamping members or other complicated and expensive members, at which threads otherwise may accumulate.

The rotatable clamping member may be placed below or above its cooperating member, and it may be hollow, cylindrical, annular or conical.

In a preferred form of the invention, the said annular clamping surface is annular and flat, and substantially parallel to the dial cap or disc and has a central bore communicating with said suction conduit, and includes a projection or pin which extends upwardly from said dial cap, or disc to engage the threads in said path and to guide them to the means at the leading end of the clamp area which directs the threads to the grip of the clamping members.

A further object of the invention is to secure the foregoing advantages thereby, that said clamping surface is annular and flat, and substantially parallel to the dial cap and has a central bore communicating with said suction means, andincluding a projection extending upwardly from said dial cap to engage the threads in said path and direct them past said transition for engagement by said rotary clamping surface, whereby the threads will be kept free from other threads hanging in the suction means or channel and will be sucked freely hanging into the suction means or channel or through the same, when they are totally severed.

To secure safe and separate clamping of threads, one of said clamping members may be resilient material, and the other may be hardened polished material.

Advantageously, according to the invention, drive means for said rotary clamping member drives said surface at a speed different from the rotary speed of said needle circle to effect tensioning of the threads.

In a machine provided with several feeds or feed stations, there may be as many clamping members, suction means or channels and severing means as feeds or feed stations.

In order that the invention may be more clearly understood, some preferred embodiments thereof will now be described with the aid of the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 shows in diagram parts of a circular knitting machine with parts of a preferred embodiment of the arrangement according to the invention, in top view and partly in horizontal section;

FIG. 2 shows other parts of the machine and the arrangement, viewed partly in vertical section;

FIG. 2a is an exploded perspective view of the. clamp ing elements shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of a knife holder with cutter belonging to the arrangement, viewed obliquely from the top and in a larger scale;

FIG. 4 shows parts of another embodiment of the arrangement viewed from above and partly in horizontal section;

FIG. 5 shows parts of a third embodiment, viewed from the top and in a larger scale;

FIG. 6 shows parts of a fourth embodiment of an arrangement according to the invention, viewed from th? top and partly in horizontal section;

FIG. 7 shows parts of same, viewed from the side and partly in section according to the line 7-7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 shows other parts, viewed partly in vertical secthe line -10 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a part of a fifth embodiment, viewed from the side;

FIG. 12 is the same, viewed partly in vertical section on the line 12-12 in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 shows the same parts, viewed partly in vertical section on the line 12-12 in FIG. 11 but with parts in a different position; and

FIG. 14 is part of the same, viewed partly in horizontal section according to the line 14-14 in FIG. 11.

The circular knitting machine, of which the parts essential to the understanding of one form of the present invention are shown, in FIGS. 1 to 3, has a dial shaft 1 extending down through a central opening in a dial cap or cover plate 2 and an associated cam ring 31 and a welt disc 3. The latter is provided with partitions or ribs 4 affording between them tricks for welt hooks 5. Knitting needles are shown at 6, one of the knock-over sinkers at 7 (FIG. 2) and reference number 8 indicates part of a sinker ring in vertical section. The movements of sinkers 7 and ring 8 may be adjusted in known manner to allow for changing from one stitch length to another.

Shaft 1 carries a toothed wheel 9 meshing with a toothed wheel 10 secured to a shaft 12 journalled in a housing 11, which latter is secured by a hub (not shown) to the dial cap 2. A gear 13 carried by the lower end of shaft 12 meshes with a gear ring 14 provided at the upper end of a tubular sleeve 15. At the lower end of sleeve 15 is a tubular mouth piece 16 made from elastic plastic material. The sleeve 15 is rotatably mounted on the lower end of a suction conduit in the form of a tube 17. Beneath the lower end of the latter is an annulus 18 the upper surface of which is opposed to the mouth piece 16 having a bore in registry with the bore of the tube 17. A segmental portion 19 of the annulus 18, in the present instance comprising a fiat elevated portion extending along approximately 45 of the circumference of the annulus, serves as an abutment to cooperate with the mouthpiece 16 to provide a clamping means for the threads. The remainder of the periphery of the annulus '18 is spaced from the mouthpiece and provides an entry for guiding the threads into the grip between the rotatable mouthpiece and the part 19 and an opening for the discharge of the severed thread ends. The annulus 18 is located in a recess 21 in plate 2, and from the bottom of the recess a projection in the form of a pin extends upwardly inside the bore of the tube 17. The pin 20 constitutes a projection which engages the threads passing over the dial cover plate 2 and guides them into the clamping area between the portion 19 and the mouthpiece 16 and maintains the threads in registry with the suction mouthpiece 16. As best shown in FIG. 2a, the abutment 18 at the leading end of the portion 19 slopes toward said mouthpiece 16 and at its trailing end slopes away from the mouthpiece.

In a bore 22 in the housing 11, there is a displaceable tube 23 having a closed lower end 24 resting on the toothed wheel 14. In tube 23, there is housed a compression spring 25 encircling at its upper end a guide pin 26 which extends from a regulating screw 27. The latter is threaded into the upper end of bore 22 and is provided with a lock nut 28. By adjustment of the screw, the clamping pressure applied by the spring to the parts 16, 19 can be adjusted.

Mounted on plate 2 is a thread-retaining arm 29. Disc 3 is provided with a curved radially extending portion 30 (FIG. 1) the outermost portion of which lies close to the knitting needles 6. The ring 31 and plate 2 have conically formed peripheral margins 32. On

plate 2, there is a guard 62 serving to raise the threads above the plate.

Secured to plate 2 is an upstanding block or bracket 33, FIGS. 2 and 3, with a hole 34 for receiving the lower end of a pin 35 on which is carried an arcuate clampingplate 36. Between the latter and another correspondingly curved thin clamping plate 3'7, there is held a piece 38 of a razor blade, the lower corner of which extends downwards beyond the plate 37. In the position shown, the corner extends close to sinker 7, FIG. 2, and close along side a knitting needle 6. It is held in this position by abutment against the sinker guiding ring 8 of a vertically adjustable pin 39, the upper threaded end of which is secured by means of nuts 40 to a transverse arm 41 extending radially from plate 36. The entire cutter arrangement 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 and 41 may be displaced upwardly by reason of the sliding engagement of the pin 35 in the hole 34 of the block 33 and can be raised by a tension spring 42 (see FIG. 3) anchored at one end to a fixed part 43 of the knitting machine and at its other end to an arm 44 of a two arm rocking lever V 44, 45 rockable about a fixed axis, and which engages beneath a transverse pin 46 carried by pin 35. The knife arrangement may be lowered to the illustrated position when an abutment 47, periodically traversed in the knitting machine, lifts the arm 45 to the position shown.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show how threads are moved into the suction mouth piece 16 and into contact with the knife 38 during the knitting of a reinforced foot part of a stocking. From the known type of thread guides 48, a

reinforcement thread 50 and a leg thread 51 are led to knitting needles 6, the reinforcement thread 50 being drawn over the edge of the curved extending part 30. The reinforcement thread 50 is knitted under the foot part of the stocking indicated in FIG. 2 by 69 on the knitting needles 6 extending approximately over an are equivalent to that between 64 to the place indicated by 63, FIG. 1, and floats across the dial from the point 63 to the point 64, in the direction shown by the arrow. The shaft 1 and the toothed wheels 9, 10, 14 and 13 rotate in the directions shown by the other arrows, FIG. 1. The leg thread 51 is knitted the whole way round on the stocking 69 simultaneously with the indicated knitting of the reinforcement thread 50 approximately halfway round on the stocking under the foot part of the latter.

From other thread carriers 49, a heel and toe thread 52, a loop row thread 53, an auxiliary thread 54 and an edge reinforcing thread 55 extend inactive during continuous knitting and are across the plate 2 and under the arm 29, their ends being sucked up into the tube 17.

From a thread carrier 56 at another knitting station, an edge reinforcing thread 58 is inactively led across the plate 2 and sucked into the tube 17. From other thread carriers 57, a leg thread 59 has been moved in its working position to needles 6 and a reinforcement thread 60 in its working position to needle 6.

The threads 50 and 60, when taken out of action, extend from the guide 48 and 57 respectively to the needles 6 to lie across the plate 2 and in between the same and the end of the mouth piece 16. They will enter and be clamped between the latter and the part 19, and from there be led tightly up to the cutter 38 by which they are severed and then sucked up into mouthpiece 16. The thread 50 may be guided round the pin 20 according to how the knitting is taking place. The thread 59 is knitted the whole way round in the stocking 69. The thread 60 may be knitted into the stocking 69 in approximately the same way as the thread 50.

Between the plate 2 and the ring 31 is fastened a knife 66 projecting a small distance out from the latter closely behind the knife 38 and comes into operation when the knife 38 is lifted up from the illustrated position. Behind the part 19-in the direction of movement-there is an air slot indicated by the dotted lines 68 (FIG. 1)

leading from the knives 38 and 66 and into the suction channel 17 for the sucking in of the cut thread ends.

In the modification shown in FIG. 4 the ring 31a ex tends for approximately half its circumference closely out to the knitting needles 6 and is formed over approximately the other half with a cut away portion 67 into which the trick walls 4 extend and the angled ends of this portion are able to catch threads and move them to positions transverse to the edge of knife 38 for sharp cutting off close to the needles 6. In FIG. 5, the extended portion of the ring 31b continues to the knife 66. In other. respects the dial cover plate arrangement is like that shown in FIGS. 1-3. I A modification of the sinker ring is also shown in FIG. 5. As shown, there is, on the innermost annular part 65 of the sinker guiding ring 8, an outwardly curved portion 70 serving as a stop to engage an upwardly extending guiding part 71 of the knocking-over sinkers 7 and to limit their inward movement to eliminate knocking over on the ring defined by portion 70.

In the position of the threads 50 and 60 illustrated in FIG. 1, they are first severed by the knife 38 and their free ends are sucked through the air slot 68 into the tube 17. When after these threads have been brought into action again the loose ends of these threads, attached to the stocking 69, reach the knife 66 as shown in FIG. 2, they are cut off and sucked away through the channel or tube 17.

By this arrangement, superfluous loose ends are, during knitting, continuously cut away from the stocking 69 and removed so that the knitted stocking is immediately freed of undesired superfluous thread ends and no expensive after-treatment is needed for the removal of loose ends. This removal is carried out without damage to the stocking. Without this removal of loose ends, there would be present at each edge of the reinforced area loose superfluous threads which would then have to be removed in some other manner by an after-treatment.

The thread ends 52, 53, 54, 55 and 58 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 hanging freely for instance in the suction channel 17 can easily and freely one by one be carried by their thread guides into positions to be taken by the needles 6 and by the latter be knitted to a stocking 69, in conjunction with the threads 50, 51, 59 and 60 in known manner. In this way, the threads do not become entangled or twisted either'during knitting or when they are severed. The threads will move safely up across the outwardly extended portion 30 and the tapering side 32.

In a modified form of machine shown in FIGS. 6-10, the machine has a driving shaft 71a extending down through a central hole in a dial cover plate 72 across a welt disc 73 with ribs 74 defining tricks in which are guided welt hooks 75. Shaft 71a serves to rotate disc 73 in the same direction as that in which the needles 76 are moved, as indicated by the arrow.

77, FIG. 10, indicates a knocking-over sinker, and 78 a part of a sinker cam ring. The knocking-over sinkers 77 and the cam ring 78 may be lifted or lowered when changing over from one to another stitch size in a manner know per se.

Above the dial cover plate 72 and extending down to a small distance above same are suction conduits 79 of which only one is shown in FIG. 10. "These conduits are connected by hose piping 80 with the suction inlet of a blower (not shown). The blowing outlet of the blower is connected by hoses 81, one of which is shown in FIG. 7, with the flat blow-oflf mouth pieces 82, which extend down close inside the knitting needles 76 and down to the upper edge of the dial 73 and at that position is provided with an outlet port 83 facing inwards towards the dial cover plate 72. On the plate 72 are conical pins 84, one of which extends a little up inside each channel 79. On the cover plate 72 is secured one end of a thread holding arm 85, and to each conduit 79 there is attached, close to the lower end, one end of a thread holding arm 86.

About the periphery of the cover plate 72 and above the peripheral part of the dial 73 is arranged a flat ring 87 with upright side edges 88 and 89, FIG. 8, between which is placed a flat ring of India rubber 90. In radial bores in the ring 87 are inserted pins 91 only one of which can be seen in FIG. 8, which extend in between upturned portions 92 of ribs or guiding and partition walls 74 in the dial 73, which parts 92 project up into an annual recess 93 in the under side of the ring 87.

On the ring may rest the hardened and polished bottom face of an upstanding arcuate clamping plate 94 of steel with curved lower corners 95 and 96 at the bottom, FIG. 9. The conical corner 95 slopes toward the ring 90 to provide an entry for the threads and the corner 96 slopes away from the ring 90 to provide a discharge opening. The plate 94 is pivotable round a pivot 97 in a fork 98 at the bottom of a non-pivotable but endwise displaceable bar 99 which is guided through a ring 100,

98, is a compression spring 102. The rings 100 and 101 are mounted on conventional levers periodically movable upwards and downwards by means, known per se, and not shown, of guiding members in knitting machines in combination with plates 103 and 104, FIG. 10. By these means also, a holder 105 for a severing member, in this case a knife 106, for severing a thread 107 on a knitting needle 76 may be lowered and lifted to various positions. In FIG. 10, it is shown in position for cutting thread 107 very close to the knitting needle 76, but it may be lifted above the disc 73 so that the welt hooks 75 may be moved outwardly below the knife 106 which then breaks the thread 107 somewhat further away from the needle 76. I

From thread guides 109 at one feed position, a thread 110 is fed to a knitting needle 76 while the free cut off thread ends 113 of other threads 111 and 112 are sucked up into the one channel 79. The threads 111 and 112 lie again under the one thread retainer 85.

In the same suction channel 79 are hanging free cut off ends 115 of threads 116 from thread guides 117 located at another feed position. From one of the thread guides 117 a thread 118 is fed to a knitting needle 76.

When threads carried along by the knitting needles 76 and the ring 87 in the direction of the arrow, FIG. 6, pass under the rounded off corner 96 of the plate 94, which is urged by its spring 102 resiliently against the ring 90 and can adjust itself to the same about its pivot 97, the threads are clamped between the ring 90 and its plate 94 and drawn against the cutting member 106 and are severed thereby. The ends of the cut thread 113 or 115 are sucked up into the channel 79 as illustrated The same happens to threads 120 and 121 from thread guides 119 at a third feed and to threads 122 from thread guides 123 at a fourth feed, the free ends 124 and 125 of which are sucked up into the other channel 79 and lie underneath the other thread retainer 85 or 86. The thread 120 is guided around the pin 84 in this other channel 79. From a thread guide 119, a thread 126 leads to a knitting needle 76, and from one of the thread guides 123 a thread 127 leads to another knitting needle 76.

The loose thread ends are blown up over the ring 87 most point 134 is located slightly in front of the rounded corner 95 of plate 94. Thus, the guide 130 can engage those portions of the threads 107 which extend from a needle 76 to the grip between ring 87 and plate 94. By moving along the sloping edge 132, the thread path is gradually distended and the threads will be tensioned and lifted into engagement with the cutter 106, both in the position illustrated in FIG. 12 and also in that of FIG. 13. The rear portion of guide 130 is, at 135, looped back as shown, the loop providing the release space for the threads after severance.

It will be seen that in all the forms of the invention illustrated in the drawings and described above, there is a clamping means for controlling the ends of the threads when thread severance is to be effected and this clamp- I ing means includes a rotatable member having clamping surface (for example, the end of the mouthpiece 16, or the ring 90), and a cooperating fixed clamping member affording a clamp area engaging a limited portion of the surface of said rotatable clamping member, in combination with means at the leading end of that area for directing the thread to the grip between the cooperating clamping members there being an opening or a space at the trailing end of the area for discharge of the severed ends, the clamping means being situated inter mediate the feed station and the severing means. The rotation of the annular clamping surface carries the thread into the said grip and holds it there for severance and afterwards removes the severed ends to the said opening at the trailing end of the clamp area where the thread is released and whence it is drawn into the suction conduit.

Iclaim:

1. In a circular knitting machine having knitting instrumentalities including a rotary needle cylinder carrying a circle of needles therein, a dial cap overlying said cylinder within said needle circle, a feed station for introducing yarn to and withdrawing yarn from said needle circle, a severing member mounted adjacent said needle circle for severing the yarns inserted and withdrawn by said feed station, and a suction means mounted to overlie said dial cap in the yarn path intermediate said severing member and said feed station to suck away the severed yarn ends; means for controlling the yarn ends for severing comprising a rotatable clamping member having a substantially fiat annular clamping surface substantially parallel to said dial cap, and a fixed abutment having a clamp area in the form of a segment of an annulus corresponding in diameter to the diameter of said clamping surface and engaging a limited portion of said annular clamping surface; said abutment at the leading end of said area sloping toward said surface to form an entry for directing the yarn between said clamp area and said clamping surface, and at the trailing end of said clamp area sloping away from said surface to form an opening for the discharge of the yarn from between said clamp area and said clamping surface, said clamping member and abutment being disposed to intercept the yarn path from said severing member to said feed station, the rotation of said clamping surface carrying the yarn in said path past the entry and between said clamping surface and said clamp area to thereby hold the yarn for severance by said severing member, and after severance carrying the yarn into said opening whereby said severed end is drawn into said suction means.

2. Yarn control means according to claim 1 wherein said annular clamping surface has a central bore communicating with said suction means, and including a projection extending upwardly from said dial cap to engage the yarns in said path and direct them past said transition for engagement by said rotary clamping surface.

3. Yarn control means according to claim 1 wherein said clamping surface is resilient material, and the clamp area is hardened polished material.

4. Yarn control means according to claim 1 wherein said suction means comprises a depending conduit overlying said dial cap and having a portion substantially perpendicular thereto, said machine including a rotary dial underlying said cap, and a central dial driveshaft parallel to said conduit portion, said clamping member comprising a tubular element, at one end surrounding said conduit portion and at the other end forming said annular clamping surface and driving connections between said shaft and said tubular element.

5. Yarn control apparatus according to claim 1 including adjustable resilient means to bias said clamping surface and clamp area together in clamping engagement.

6. Yarn control apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the knitting machine includes a rotary dial underlying said dial cap, and partitions in said dial for guiding welt hooks, said dial cap being of reduced diameter'in advance of said severing member to expose said partitions whereby said partitions engage the yarn and direct it at right angles to said severing member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,086,570 2/1914 Walker 66-134 2,259,375 10/1941 Grothey et a1. 66-134 2,908,154 10/1959 Butler 66-140 3,006,173 10/1961 Shoaf 66-145 X 3,019,628 2/1962 Page 66-140 X 3,050,970 8/1962 Billi 66-140 3,075,374 1/1963 St. Pierre 66-145 3,077,097 2/1963 Butler 66-140 3,079,779 3/1963 Butler et a1. 66-140 3,081,609 3/1963 .Mahler 66-145 X 3,174,307 3/1965 Mayer 66-154 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,284,283 1/1962 France. 593,152 5/1959 Italy.

DONALD W. PARKER, Primary Examiner.

RUSSELL C. MADER, Examiner.

W. C. REYNOLDS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2259375 *Dec 23, 1938Oct 14, 1941Scott & Williams IncClamping and cutting mechanism for circular knitting machines
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US3019628 *Sep 19, 1958Feb 6, 1962Scott & Williams IncClamping and cutting means for circular knitting machine
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3306079 *Sep 9, 1963Feb 28, 1967Scott & Williams IncKnitting machines
US3367146 *Jun 28, 1965Feb 6, 1968Alamance Ind IncElastic yarn tensioning and clamping mechanism for knitting machines
US3420076 *Nov 3, 1966Jan 7, 1969Luzzatto EttoreMethod and device for severing and mechanically removing yarn ends in circular knitting machines for fine knitted goods,in particular stockings
US3488679 *Nov 14, 1966Jan 6, 1970Schubert & Salzer MaschinenYarn severing device for circular knitting machine
US3496738 *Sep 20, 1967Feb 24, 1970Billi SpaThread cutting device for circular knitting hosiery machines
US3668899 *Jul 6, 1970Jun 13, 1972Barber Nicholls LtdCircular knitting machine
US3949571 *Nov 29, 1974Apr 13, 1976Hampshire-Designers, Inc.Elastic yarn binder and cutter
US5347832 *Nov 24, 1993Sep 20, 1994Richard CopenhaverYarn binder apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/134, 66/140.00S
International ClassificationD04B15/38, D04B15/60
Cooperative ClassificationD04B15/60
European ClassificationD04B15/60