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Publication numberUS3257898 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1966
Filing dateJun 6, 1962
Priority dateJun 6, 1962
Publication numberUS 3257898 A, US 3257898A, US-A-3257898, US3257898 A, US3257898A
InventorsErnest C Webb
Original AssigneeCleveland Trust Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bowling score projector
US 3257898 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. C. WEBB BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR June 28, 1966 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 6, 1962 INVENTOR Ernest C.Webb M E ATTORNEYS June 28, 1966 E. c. WEBB BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 6, 1962 INVENTOR Ernest C. Webb BY W M ATTORNEYS June 28, 1966 E. c. WEBB 3,257,898

BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR Filed June 6, 1962 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR Ernest C. Webb ATTORNEYS June 28, 1966 E. c. WEBB BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR Filed June 6, 1962 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR Ernest C. Webb BY ATTORNEYS June 28, 1966 E. c. WEBB BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 6, 1962 Fig. 8.

ZIO-

INVENTOR Ernest C. Webb ATTORNEYS June 28, 1966 E. c. WEBB BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR 8 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed June 6, 1962 u llll 3 5 .Huuuu w w lllll I: m i W mhm INVENTOR Ernest C. Webbw ATTORNEYS June 28, 1966 E. c. WEBB 3,257,898

BOWLING SCORE PROJECTOR Filed June 6, 1962 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 J Fig. I6.

4 H I? 24 2 INVENTOR Ernest C. Webb ATTORNEYS game progresses.

' through the sheet.

United States Patent 3,257,898 BQWLING SCORE PROJECTOR Ernest C. Webb, Bay Village, Ohio, assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Cleveland Trust Co., Cleveland, Ohio (trustee), a banking institution Filed June 6, 1962, Ser. No. 200,555 5 Claims. '(Cl. 8824) The present invention relates, in general, to apparatus for projecting the image of an article onto a screen, and more particularly to an optical projector in which light reflected from an object is projected onto a screen.

Although not limited thereto, the present invention is particularly adapted for use with apparatus for detecting, totalizing and printing the ball results and score on a bowling game score sheet, such as that shown in copending application Serial No. 175,865, filed February 9, 1962, now Patent No. 3,124,355, issued March 10, 1964 wherein the score is printed on a translucent or the like score sheet divided into player lines and frames. Positioned above the score sheet and parallel thereto is a transparent plate, while printing apparatus is positioned beneath the score sheet and movable over its entire surface, the printing apparatus being movable upwardly to press the sheet against the translucent plate and produce printed characters thereon. Positioned parallel to the underside of the score sheet is a light-colored opaque plate which is carried by the printing apparatus so as to' provide a background for the printed characters on the translucent sheet. Cut into this plate is an aperture through which the type of the printing apparatus is adapted to project. A light-colored shutter covers the aforesaid aperture when the printing device is removed from the underside of the sheet but opens when the printing apparatus is moved toward the underside of the sheet to permit characters to be printed thereon. As will be understood, this arrangement provides a unique and convenient means for printing on the underside of a score sheet or the like such that the printed characters may be viewed from above through the aforesaid transparent plate with the opaque plate serving as a background for the printed characters.

In many cases it is necessary or desirable to project the printed score onto a screen above the alley as the Projectors have been provided in the past for score sheets of the conventional type on which the score is manually entered. Such projectors usually comprise means for passing light through the sheet itself,

, the light being thereafter focused onto a screen. Although it is preferable to project any image onto a. screen by passing light through a translucent sheet, film or the like, this procedure is unavailable with score printing apparatus of the type described above since the printing mechanism is directly beneath the sheet and prevents light from being passed through the sheet.

Accordingly, as one object, the present invention provides a means whereby light is directed through a transparent plate and onto a bowling game score sheet or the like positioned on a light-colored opaque plate, the light reflected from the sheet being focused onto a screen.

As will be understood, the reflection method for projecting the image of a bowling game score sheet or other object onto a screen is much more ineflicient than the conventional method wherein the light is passed directly As a result, it becomes necessary to employ a light source of very high intensity which can be directed onto the score sheet or other object such that the reflected light will be of sufficient intensity to produce a reasonably satisfactory image on the screen. The use of high intensity light source, however, involves certain inherent problems. Notable among these is the generation of a great deal of heat which, in the absence of some cooling means, will burn or at least scorch a score sheet of the type described above. For example, in one embodiment of the invention, it has been found that the temperature of the transparent plate above the score sheet raises to a temperature which may very well damage the score sheet, and since the score sheet will remain under this transparent plate during the entire time that a bowling game is being played, resultant damage to the score sheet can very easily occur.

Therefore, as another object, the invention provides means for cooling or carrying away heat from a transparent plate and a bowling game score sheet positioned under the plate, the reflected image of which is projected onto a screen. Preferably, this is accomplished by directing an air stream across the transparent plate above the score sheet whereby the plate and, hence, the score sheet are also cooled.

Since the reflection method of projecting an image of an article onto a screen is inherently ineflicient it is, of course, desirable to eliminate all factors which contribute to the inefficiency of the system. In this respect, it has been found that the spacing between the score sheet, the transparent plate on one side, and the opaque plate on the other side which provides alight-colored background, should be as small as possible. For example, it has been found that a spacing of as little as of an inch between the score sheet and the opaque backing plate will materially reduce the clarity of the reflected imageas projected onto a screen.

Accordingly, as another object, the invention provides a means whereby the aforesaid score sheet is maintained in snug abutting relationship with both the transparent plate and the opaque light-colored plate beneath the score sheet. In one embodiment of the invention, this is achieved by spring-loading of the light-colored opaque plate beneath the score sheet such that it will press the score sheet upwardly into abutting relationship with the transparent plate, and this notwithstanding the fact that the opaque plate and the printing apparatus which carries it must move or slide over the under surface of the score sheet. In another embodiment of the invention, an inflatable light-colored bag of polyethylene or the like is interposed between the aforesaid opaque plate and the score sheet such that when the bag is inflated the score sheet Will be pressed upwardly into engagement with the transparent plate while the inflated bag, being opaque also, will provide the necessary closely-abutting light-colored background for the translucent score sheet.

Another object of the invention is to provide a holder for a score. sheet which is adapted to insert the score sheet between the aforesaid transparent plate and the lightcolored opaque plate beneath it. In the aforesaid US. Patent No. 3,124,355, successive score sheets were pro vided on a continuous roll, the arrangement being such that whenthe bowling game was completed and one score sheet fully printed, the end of the printed score sheet.

could be pulled out of the space between the transparent and opaque plates while automatically moving a fresh score sheet into this space. method, however, is that a new roll of score sheets must be supplied to the scoring apparatus from time-to-time, and each time a new roll is inserted, the end of the conthereafter removed at the completion of a bowling game with the result that the necessity for replacing a roll of score sheets and threading the sheets through the apparatus are eliminated.

Patented June28, 1966 One difliculty with this Still another object of the invention is to provide an arrangement wherein individual score sheets may be inserted into the space between the aforesaid transparent plate and light-colored backing plate without the need for the clamp mentioned in the preceding object.

The above and other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification, and In which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a pair of bowling alleys showing the location of the projector of the present invention and the screens onto which the printed score is projected;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the projector console;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view looking toward the front of the projector of the invention and showing the location of the reflecting mirrors therein;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along line IVIV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a top view of the score sheet clip or holder for the projector of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along line VIVI of FIG. 5

FIG. 7 is a top view of the score sheet clip or holder of the invention showing the manner in which the score sheet is held therein;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the printing apparatus used in connection with the present invention showing an alternative arrangement for holding the score sheet in close abutting relationship with the transparent plate above it;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the inflatable bag of FIG. 8 used to hold the score sheet in close abutting relationship with the transparent plate;

FIG. 10 is an end view of a holder for the mirrors shown in FIGS. 3 and 4;

FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional side view of another embodiment of the invention for inserting and clamping the score sheet between the transparent and opaque plates of the aforesaid printing apparatus;

FIG. 12 is a top view of the embodiment of the inven tion shown in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is an end view of the clamp of the embodiment of FIGS. 11 and 12 taken substantially along line XIII-XIII of FIG. 11;

FIG. 14 is a top view of the score printing console incorporating the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 11 and 12 and illustrating the arrow means for indicating the player who is bowling in a game;

FIG. 15 is a top view of a player tab assembly comprising a plurality of tabs with carbon paper therebetween, the assembly being insertable in a holder adjacent the player push-buttons shown in FIG. 14 and thereafter separated in order that one of the tabs may be attached to the completed score sheet;

FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view of an alternative form of the projector wherein the score is projected onto ground glass screens; and

FIG. 17 is an end view of the projector of FIG. 16.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, a pair of adjacent bowling alleys A and B are each provided with a pin deck 10 at the forward end of the alley and a foul line 12 at the opposite end. Ahead of each foul line 12 is an approach area 14; and between the approach areas 14 is a space 16, which space is occupied between the alleys A and B proper by gutters 18. In the usual case, a ball return, not shown, will also be provided, said ball return having a ball rack in the area 16. Behind each of the pin decks 10 is a pit, generally indicated at 19; and behind each pit is a backstop 20.

The projector 21 of the present invention is positioned over the top of a console 22 which houses automatic scoring, totalizing and printing apparatus such as that shown in US. Patent No. 3,124,355. Actually, the console 22 houses two automatic scoring, totalizing and printing units, one for each of the alleys A and B. Each unit includes printing apparatus which prints the score on the underside of a transparent or translucent score sheet, the score being visible through a transparent plate positioned above the score sheet in the top of console 22. Behind the projector 21 on the console 22 are pushbuttons 24, one set of pushbnttons being provided for each of the alleys A and B. By reference to the aforesaid U.S. Patent No. 3,124,355, it will be understood that as each bowler prepares to bowl, he pushes one of the buttons 24 which is beside his name on a tab inserted adjacent the buttons 24. Thereafter, when he delivers balls in each frame, the ball results of each ball will be printed on the score sheet and the score added to his previous score in the circuitry within console 22. In addition, upon completion of the frame, his score will be printed in his frame box corresponding to the frame being played if no marks have been made in that frame. If marks have been made in the frame being played, then the score is not printed at that time but stored preparatory to printing after the next or successive frames in accordance with the rules of the American Bowling Congress. Suspended above each alley A and B is a luminescent screen 26 or 28, respectively, onto which the printed score is projected by the projector 21.

As best shown in FIG. 2, the top of console 22 is provided with the aforesaid two transparent plates 30 and 32 underneath which are the score sheets, one for each alley. If 'desired, the projector 21 may be removed from the console 22 and the score sheets observed directly through the transparent plates 30 and 32. Behind the plates 30 and 32 are the pus-h'buttons 24 already described, one of these pushbnttons being provided for each player, the arrangement being such that each player presses his pushbutton when he prepares to bowl in accordance with the teachings of the aforesaid US. Patent No. 3,124,355. Projecting upwardly from the console 22 is a conduit 34 which conveys cooling air through an opening 36 in the projector 21 and across the tops of the transparent plates 30 and 32 in a manner hereinafter described. Extending out of the front of projector 21 are tubes or cylinders 38 and 40 which house lenses for the purpose of projecting the score onto the screens 26 and 28 of FIG. 1.

Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4, the projector 21 is shown resting on the top 42 of the console 22. It comprises an outer housing 44 (FIG. 4) having a frontal face through which the lens-carrying tubes 38 and 48 project.

Carried within the housing 44 is a generally rectangular structure comprising a front plate 46, a rear plate 48 of smaller height, and a pair of side plates 50, only one of which is shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. Carried within the generally rectangular structure defined by plates 46, 48 and 50 are a second pair of spaced plates 52 and 54, only the single plate 52 being shown in FIG. 3. Extending between the plates 52 and 54 is a housing assembly 56 comprising an upper arcuate portion having a reflective upper surface 6!). Depending downwardly from the arcuate portion 58 are skirt portions 62 and 64; and at the bottom of the skirt portions 62 and 64 are arcuate plates 66 and 68 which form passageways 7i and '72 between the interior of the housing structure 56 and the upper surface 42 of the console 22. It will be noted that the passageways 70 and 72 terminate at the edges of the transparent plates 30 and 32.

With reference to FIG. 4, it can be seen that the conduit 34 extends through the opening 36 in the outer housing 44 and communicates with the interior of the structure defined by the housing assembly 56. A blower or other source of air under pressure, not shown, is connected to the conduit 34 beneath top 42 such that air will be forced into the interior of the housing structure 56 as indicated by the arrows 74 in FIG. 4. This air under of light.

- pressure will then be forced out through the passageways 70 and 72 along the general path of the arrows 76 shown in FIG. 3, this air being used for cooling purposes as will hereinafter be explained.

Provided in the plates 52 and 54 above the housing structure 56 are slots 78 which receive the terminal connectors 80 of a mercury arc lamp 82. As best shown in FIG. 4, the lamp 82 extends along the entire length between the spaced plates 52 and 54 above the arcuate portion 58, the arrangement being such that any light directed onto the reflective surface 60 from the lamp will be reflected directly back to the lamp along lines 84, for example. Above the lamp 82 and extending between the plates .52 and 54 is a structure 86 comprising a pair of parabolic reflectors 88 and 90 which serve to direct the light from the lamp 82 through the transparent plates 30 and 32, respectively, along lines 92, for example, and onto score sheets 93 and 95 positioned therebeneath. In this respect, it will .be understood that the lamp 82, being of the mercury arc type, provides an intense line source Side reflectors 83 and 85 serve to concentrate any stray light beams onto the plates 30 and 32.

From the score sheet 93 beneath transparent plate 30, for example, the light is reflected along line 94 to a mirror 96, and from mirror 96 along line 98 to a second mirror 100. Finally, light reflected from the mirror 100 along line 102 is reflected from mirror 106 and along line 108 out through the tube or cylinder 40 and the lenses carried therein where it is projected onto the screen 28 (FIG. 1). In a somewhat similar manner,.the light reflected from the score sheet 95 beneath the transparent plate 32 is directed along line 110 where it is reflected from mirror 112 and along line 114 to mirror 116. Finally, the light reflected from mirror 116 along line 118 is reflected from a third mirror 120 and along line 122 and through the tube or cylinder 38 and the lenses carried therein to the screen 26. As shown, the various mirrors are supported on the plates 50 or 46 by means of mirror holders, generally indicated at 124.

As best shown in FIG. 10, each mirror holder comprises a shaft 126 which is secured to a-generally arcuate plate 128 having inwardly-bent portions 130 at its opposite ends. Each inwardly-bent portion 130 terminates in a downwardly-extending portion 132 disposed at an angle of approximately 45 with respect to a mirror 134 held by the holder. In this manner, it can be seen that the mirror 134 is securely held between the median lower surface of the arcuate portion 128 and the 45 end portions 132 which serve to urge the edgs of the mirror inwardly and upwardly by virtue of their 45 angularity. As will be understood, this arrangement provides a simple and inexpensive means for securely holding the various mirrors in position.

Referring again to FIGS. 3 and 4, immediately adjacent the sides of the transparent plates 30 and 32 are guideways 136 and 138, each comprising a pair of abutting strips of thin stainless steel or the like which are relatively flexible in nature. Only the one gnideway 136 is shown in FIG. 4. These guideways 136 and 138 serve to hold the transparent plate 36) or 32 against the underside of the top plate 42 of console 22 and also serve to receive a clip, hereinafter described, which holds the score sheet 93 or 95 in position beneath each transparent plate. Underneath each transparent plate is a score printing mechanism, the details of which may be understood by reference to the aforesaid US. Patent No. 3,124,355. Each printing mechanism includes printing wheels, schematically illustrated at 146, which are adapted to move upwardly and into engagement with the score sheet 93 or 95 to print numerals thereon. The printing wheels 140 are carried on a carriage, generally indicated at 142. This carriage is adapted to move in onedirection parallel to the long transverse dimension of the score sheet and in a second direction perpendicular thereto. In this manner, the

printing wheels can move over the entire surface of the score sheet such that they will be positioned beneath a particular frame box in any player line. Carried on-the carriage 142 above the printing wheels is a lightcolored opaque plate 144 having its transverse dimension substantially equal to twice those of the transparent plate 30 or 32 such that a light-colored background will be provided beneath the transparent plate regardless of the position of the printing wheels therebeneath. Provided in the plate 144 is an aperture or opening 146 through which the printing wheels 140 project. Covering the aperture 146 is a shutter 148, the arrangement being such that in order to print on the score sheet 93 or 95, the printing wheels 140 will be moved upwardly, whereupon the shutter 14% will be moved downwardly to uncover the aperture 146 and permit the printing characters on wheels 140 to make contact with the underside of the score sheet 93 or 95. When the printing wheels again move downwardly, the shutter 148 will move upwardly to again cover the aperture 146. a

As was mentioned above, in order to project a reasonably satisfactory image onto the screen 26 or- 28, it is of primary importance that the light-colored background provided by the plate 144 be as close to the score sheet 93 or 95 as possible. In this respect, it has been found that a spacing of as little as 19, of an inch will materially reduce the quality of the image produced. Therefore, in accordance with one aspect of the present invention,

means are provided for resiliently urging the plate 144 upward-1y into engagement with the underside of the score sheet 93 or 95 to minimize the spacing therebetween. In the particular embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS, 3 and 4, this means includes pins 150 secured to the underside of the plate 144. One set of pins on one side of the plate 144 extend downwardly through openings in the top flange of backing plate 152 of the printing mechanism; whereas the other set of pins on the other side of the plate 144 project through flanges extending outwardly from end plate 156 extending-outwardly from the backing plate 152. Each pin 150 is provided with a collar 158, and between these collars and lower flanges 160 and 162 are coil springs 164, the arrangement being such that the springs will urge the pins 150 and the plate 144 carried thereby upwardly and into engagement with the underside of the transparent plate 30 or 32. The springs 164 will resiliently but snugly urge the plate 144 into engagement with the underside of the score sheet 93 or 95, but will nevertheless permit the plate 144 to slide over the underside without a great deal of frictional resistance between the two. 4

As was mentioned above, the mercury arc lamp 82 Accordingly, the upper surfaces of the transparent plates 30 and 32 are each provided with a coating which reflects a major portion of the heat-producing infrared rays while passing the remainder of the light. Furthermore, the underside of each of the plates 30 and 32 is provided with a surface which minimizes reflection at the underside of each plate so that the light will pass through the plates and be reflected from the score sheet itself. It has been found that the transparent plates 30 and 32 will heat up to a temperature which will damage the score sheet in the absence of some type of cooling means. Accordingly, cooling is provided for these plates by passing an air stream from passages 70 and 72 across the tops of the plate 30 and 32. In the cooling process, the air passes from conduit 34 into the space defined by the housing assembly 56, and thence through the passageways 70 and 72 which extend along one edge of each of the transparent plates andacross the tops of these transparent plates, thereby carrying away heat to lower the temperature of the apparatus and prevent scorching of the score sheets,

In order to insert the score sheet 93 or 95 into the space between the transparent plate 30 or 32 and its associated opaque backing plate 144, a clip such as that shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 is provided. The clip comprises a pair of elongated sides 168 and 170 each comprising a pair of superimposed stainless steel strips 172 and 174 (FIG. 6). Extending between the side members 168 and 170 and interposed between the stainless steel strips 172 and 174 of each side member are spacers 176, 178, 180 and 182. As shown, each of the spacers 176 182 is spot-welded to its associated side members 168 and 170 as at 184. The left end of the clip is bent upwardly as at 186 to provide a handle which may easily be grasped by the fingers. Slid-able between the laminated stainless steel strips 172 and 174 of each side member'168 and 170 are a pair of members 188 and 190, and spot-welded to each of these slideab'le members are a pair of strips 192, possibly best shown in FIG. 6. The clip is shown in FIG. with the score sheet 93, 95 removed and with the sli-deable bars or members 188 removed from the spacers 178 and 180. In order to insert the score sheet into the clip, it will be initially stretched between the spacers 178 and 188, and the slideable members 188 and 190 moved toward the spacers 178 and 189 whereby the strips 192 will pass over and engage the ends of the score sheet to hold it in position as shown in FIG. 7 wherein the members 188 and 198 are moved toward the strips 178 and 180 to pass strips 192 over the ends of the score sheet and hold it in position.

In order to insert the clip and the score sheet held thereby between the transparent plate or 32 and its associated opaque backing plate 144, the clip is inserted, right end first as viewed in FIG. 7, into a slot 193 (FIG. 4) provided in the top 42 of console 22. When the end of the clip is passed into the slot 193 in this manner, it will pass along the guideways 138 and 136 each comprising a pair of superimposed stainless steel strips or the like; and since the strips 172 and 174 of the clip are flexible as are the strips which form the guideways 136 and 138, the clip will pass under the transparent plate 30 or 32 while forcing the opaque backing plate 144 downwardly. The clip is pushed all of the way into the slot 193 such that only the handle portion 186 extends out of it, whereupon the score sheet 93 or 95 will be directly beneath the transparent plate 30 or 32. In order to remove the clip and the score sheet carried thereby at the end of a game, the clip is merely grasped by its handle 186 and pulled out of the slot 193.

With reference to FIGS. 5 and 7, it will be noted that notched or angled portions 194 and 196 are provided for each of the spacers 188 and 182, respectively. These are necessary since the clip must pass over the shutter 148 shown in FIG. 3. That is, the shutter 148 will project above the upper surface of the opaque backing plate 144, and if theforward edge of spacer 182 were straight, it would engage the shutter 148 which would prevent or impede its passage further into the slot- 193 and along guideways 136 and 138. By virtue of the angled portion 196, however, this portion will progressively engage the shutter to push it downwardly whereby the clip may pass thereover. The angled portion 194 operates in the same manner when the clip is pulled out of the guideways 136, 138 and the slot 193. That is, it will progressively engage the shutter 148 to force it downwardly and permit the clip to pass thereover. The angled portions 194 and 196 are provided at one side of the clip only since, when a game begins or ends, the printing wheels will always be over the first frame of the first line on the score sheet, generally indicated at 198 in FIG. 7. This frame, it will be noted, is directly in line with the angled portions 194 and 196.

With reference now to FIG. 8, one of the printing wheels is shown in greater detail and comprises a central disc 200 having a plurality of raised printing characters 202 in its periphery. In a printing operation, the backing plate 152 and the printing Wheel 2199 are moved upwardly by means, not shown herein. The shutter 148, however, is connected through a linkage 294 to part of the printing mechanism which also does not move upwardly so that as the printing wheels move upwardly, the shutter will be pulled downwardly to expose or uncover the aperture 146 above the printing wheels. Movable over the tops of the printing wheels is a roll of tape 286, the tape being guided between pairs of curved stainless steel plates 208 on either side of the printing wheel 2%. The tape 206 is carried on a supply reel 210 and thereafter passes over a roller 211 into the space between the plates 208, there by passing over the aperture 146 in plate 144. Thereafter, it passes over a driven roll 214 and thence to a takeup reel 216 which is continuously urged to rotate in the direction of the arrow by a slip clutch arrangement, not shown herein. The roll 214 is driven through gears 218 and 220, the gear 220 being keyed or otherwise securely fastened to a shaft 222 which rotates during each printing operation. Beneath the roll 214 is an idler roll 224 connected to a solenoid 226, the arrangement being such that when the solenoid is energized, the roll 224 will be urged upwardly into engagement with roll 214, thereby advancing the tape which is taken up on the roll 216. For a full and detailed description of the operation of the tape mechanism, reference may be had to the aforesaid copending application Serial No. 175,865.

It has been found that in addition to the heating of the score sheet mentioned above, the carbon tape 206 will also become heated. Accordingly, a conduit 228 supplies air under pressure into the area of the printing tape to thereby carry away heat in much the same manner as heat is carried away from the tops of plates 38 and 32. The air from conduit 228, of course, also serves to cool at least a portion of the bottom of the opaque backing plate 144 and the score sheet above it.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 8, the opaque backing plate 144 is not spring-loaded as it is in FIG. 3. Rather, an inflatable bag 2315 of polyethylene or the like is inserted into the space between the plate 144 and the score sheet 93 or for the purpose of urging the score sheet into snug abutting relationship with the underside of the transparent plate 30 or 32. The inflatable plastic bag is probably best shown in FIG. 9 and comprises parallel sheets of plastic which are preferably heat sealed at their edges. In addition, an aperture 232 is cut into the bag 230 and heat sealed around its edges to provide an opening above the aperture 146 in plate 144 such that the printing wheels may pass therethrough. As was mentioned above, the inflatable bag 230 is preferably polyethylene, although any plastic material which has a slippery surface so as to provide minimized fractional contact between the bag and the score sheet may be used. The plastic, which is normally translucent, must be colored to provide a white brilliancy to facilitate the necessary light-colored background for the translucent score sheet. The bag, when inflated, will provide the necessary snug abutting backup for the score sheet, but at the same time, because of its slippery surface, will not impede movement of the plate 144 and the printing wheels underneath over the surface of the score sheet, nor will it impede insertion or withdrawal of the score sheet-carrying clip into the guideways 136 and 138. Preferably, the inflatable plastic bag 2343 is glued to the upper surface of backing plate 144, although any fastening means may be used to suit requirements.

FIGS. 11, 12 and 13 disclose another arrangement of the invention wherein the clip of FIGS. 5-7 and the guideways 136 and 138 (FIG. 3) may be entirely eliminated. With reference to FIG. 11, it will be noted that the transparent plate 30 is held on the upper plate or surface 42 of console 22 by means of clamps 240, each of which includes a lower flanged portion v242 which overlaps the edge of the transparent plate 30, and a. shank portion 244 having its upper end threaded for' the reception of a nut 246. The plate 144 is directly beneath the transparent plate 30' as in the previous embodiment and is spring-biased upwardly by means similar to springs 164 in FIG. 3, the force of the springs being indicated by the arrows 248 in FIG. 11.

At either end of the transparent plate 30 are clamps 250 and 252. Both clamps are identical and comprise a lower plate 254 sandwiched between the upper plate 42' of the console and the opaque backing plate 144. Spot-welded or otherwise securely fastened to the opposite ends of plate 254 are two upwardly-extending pins 256 having reduced diameter portions at their upper ends for the reception of a crossbar 258. The aforesaid upper reduced diameter portions of the pins 256 are threaded and receive nuts 260 whereby the bar 258 may be securely held to the pins. Surrounding'the pins between the upper surface 42 of the console and the underside of bar 258 are coil springs 262, the arrangement being such that the springs will normally urge bar 258 and the plate 254 upwardly into close abutting relationship with the underside of the top plate of the console. As will be understood, however, the plate 254 may be moved downwardly on either clamp 250 or 252 by simply depressing the bar 258. For this purpose, a button 264 is provided at the center of each bar 258 and is adapted to engage a cam lever 266 which is pivoted to the upper surface 42 as at 268, the arrangement being such that eachcam lever may be rotated in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 12. With particular reference to FIGS. 11 and 13, it will be noted that the upper portion 270 of each cam lever 266 is beveled or slanted such that when the cam lever 266 is rotated to the right as viewed in FIG. 13, for example, the bar 258 and plate 254 will be moved downwardly. Conversely, when the cam lever 266 is moved to the left as viewed in FIG. 13, the springs 262 will force the bar 258 and plate 254 upwardly.

' Provided at the forward end of the upper surface 42 is an inclined'slot 272. In order to load the translucent or the like score sheet 273 into the apparatus, the cam levers are initially rotated to depress the bars 258 and plates 254. In this process, the opaque, light-colored backing plate 144' is also depressed so as to leave a space between the transparent plate 30 and the plate 144. Thereafter, the forward edge of the score sheet 273 is inserted through the slot 272, and as the score sheet is pushed into the slot, its forward edge will engage the upper surface of plate 144' and pass over the plate 254 for clamp 250. Thereafter, the score sheet will pass between the pins 256 for clamp 250, these pins acting as edge guides for the score sheet as it is advanced into the space between plates 30' and 144'. Additionally, other pins may be provided in alignment with pins 256 if desired.

After passing beneath the transparent plate 30' the score sheet passes over the forward edge of the plate 254 for clamp 252. If desirable or necessary, edge guiding pins on either side of the score sheet may be provided at the right end of the transparent plate 30' as viewed in FIGS. 11 and 12 for the purpose of correctly registering the score sheet. In most cases, however, the score sheet can be correctly registered without the necessity for such guiding pins. Preferably, a mark or registering line will be provided on the transparent plate 30 which can be aligned with a corresponding mark or line on the score sheet such that the player can easily determine when the score sheet is properly positioned.

After the score sheet is once positioned, the cam levers 266 will be rotated in the opposite direction, whereby the plates 254 will move upwardly to clamp the sheet to the underside of the upper surface 42. At the same time, the plate 144', being spring-loaded, will also move upwardly into close abutting relationship with the score sheet so as to provide a good background therefor. If desirable or necessary, the score sheet, being of thin translucent paper and relatively flexible, may be initially at tached -to a thin sheet'of transparent Mylar or the like having a thickness of 0.007 to 0.010 inch, the score sheet being attached to this Mylar backing plate by pressure sensitive gum spots or the like. I Another possibility is to provide a score sheet which itself is formed of Mylar or other similar plastic, and having one side frosted whereby printed characters. may be produced thereon. Still another arrangement is to have the outline of the score sheet (i.e., the lines and frames) printed or otherwise produced on the underside of the transparent plate 30, in which case the translucent score sheet inserted into the slot 272 may be blank to eliminate all problems in aligning the score sheet beneath the transparent plate. In this latter case, hereinafter more fully described, the completed score sheet would have only the printed characters thereon, however, this will nevertheless serve as a permanent record since the frame-to-frame and total score of each player will be registered along a straight line on the completed score sheet.

With reference now to FIG. 14, the aperture 146' in the opaque backing plate 144 is directly beneath the first frame for the first player on the score sheet. This is the position assumed at the beginning of a bowling game. Note that the length of plate 144' on either side of the aperture 146 is equal to the length of the ten frame boxes and that the width of plate 144' above and below the aperture 146' is equal to the width of.the five lines on the score sheet. This is necessary in order to have the backing plate 144' cover the complete score sheet regardless of which frame is being played. As was mentioned above, the opaque backing plate 144 is lightcolored, preferably white. It is, of course, highly desirable to provide a means for readily appraising the bowlers playing a game to which player line the printing apparatus will print on. It might happen, for example, that bowler No. 1 might depress the No. 2 pushbutton rather than his correct N0. 1 puslibutton. In this case, the aperture 146 and the printing wheels beneath it would move to the second player line in accordance with the teachings of the aforesaid US. Patent No. 3,124,355.

In order to readily appraise the players of the player line on which the score, will be entered, an arrow 280 is provided on the light-colored opaque backing plate 144' and extends from the right edge of the aperture 146' as viewed in FIG. 14 to the right edge of the plate 144. It has been found that when the arrow is red, black printed characters on the score sheet which are over that red arrow can nevertheless be readily distinguished, even when the score sheet is projected onto a screen by the projector previously described. The arrow will be beneath printed characters when, for example, a strike, spare, or double is made during a bowling game, necessitating the aperture 146' and printing wheels to move to the left of ball results which have already been printed in succeeding frames. Let us assume, for example, that strikes have been achieved in the first and second frames, meaning that no score will be entered in these frames until the third frame is played. Before the score is entered the first frame, however, the ball results of the first ball delivered in the third frame will be printed in the third frame box, whereupon the aperture 146 and the printing wheels therebeneath will move backwardly to the first frame. This means that the arrow will now cover the printed ball results in both the second and third frames, and if the arrow should be black or the like, it will obscure the printed characters. On the other hand, if it is a light color such as yellow it will not be readily distinguishable, particularly when the score sheet is projected onto a screen. The red color, however, provides a good compromise whereby the arrow may be readily seen and at the same time will not obscure the ball result-s printed in any of the frames.

In FIG. 14 it will be noted that adjacent the player pushbuttons 24 are a pair of parallel clips or guideways 282 and 284 which receive a player tab assembly, gencrally indicated at 236. Printed on the player tab assembly 286 are player lines 288 on which the names of the respective players may be written such that each name will appear adjacent the pushbutton 24 which that player should depress before he bowls. To the side of the player lines 283 are a series of ten boxes for each player, these boxes being available for manually recording with a pencil, if desired, such additional data as provisional balls delivered during the game.

With reference to FIG. 15, it can be seen that the player tab assembly 286 comprises three laminated sheets 290, 292 and 294 having identical, superimposed printing thereon (i.e., the player lines 238 and adjacent boxes). Sheets of carbon paper, not shown, are interposed between the sheets 2%, 292 and 292, 294 such that the players name and other information entered on the first sheet 290 will automatically be entered on the other two sheets also. The left-hand edges of the sheets 290294 are bound or glued together and provided with a perforated line 296 such that each sheet may be torn from the other along this line.

As was mentioned above, the outline of the score sheet (i.e., the lines and frames) may be printed or otherwise produced on the underside of the transparent plate such that the score sheet itself may be blank. An arrangement of this sort is particularly adapted for use with a score sheet feed arrangement of the type shown in copending application Serial No. 166,633 filed January 16, 1962. and assigned to the assignee of of the present application, the score sheet material is stored on a roll within the console 22 and is threaded between the transparent plate 30 or 32 (FIG. 3) and the opaque backing plate 144 with its forward end terminating at a slot somewhat similar to the slot 272 shown in FIG. 14. In the case of a continuous roll, however, a combined clamp and shear .is provided adjacent the slot through which the score sheet material passes in order that the end of the continuous score sheet material may be clamped during a printing operation, and the score sheet thereafter pulled out of the slot until its trailing end is beneath the shear, at which point the completed score sheet is severed from the remainder of the continuous roll. A continuous roll arrangement of this type eliminates all problems in inserting the score sheet between the transparent and backing plates; and since the outline of the score sheet is provided on the back of the transparent plate above it, all problems of aligning the score sheet are likewise eliminated. In the usual case, a continuous roll of score sheet material will have its trailing end secured to the core of the spool on which it is stored, the arrangement being such that when the spool is empty, the trailing end of the score sheet material will not be pulled out of the space between the transparent and backing plates. Rather, the leading end of a new spool or score sheet material may be attached to the trailing end of the previous spool and the continuous material pulled through the space between the transparent and backing plates. Thus, the score sheet need be threaded through the machine only once.

With reference again to FIG. 15, it will be seen that the back. of the sheet 290 of the player tab assembly 286 may be provided with a strip of pressure-sensitive gum 298 such that a completed score sheet 30% may be attached thereto. This arrangement, of course, is particularly adaptable for use with a score sheet which does not have the player lines and frames printed thereon. That is, a completed score sheet of this type will have the ball results for each frame and progressive score for each player extending along a straight line which can be readily aligned with that players name on the tab 290. Thus, in observing the completed score sheet, any player can readily observe his frame-to-frame and final score along a straight line extending adjacent his name together with his ball results achieved in each frame.

In playing the game with apparatus in which the score sheet is blank and the player lines and frames are scribed on the bottom of the transparent plate 30 or 32, the players names are entered on the top sheet 290 of the player tab assembly 286 whereby these names will be impressed also on the sheets 292 and 294 by virtue of the carbon paper between them. Thereafter, the sheets 290-294 are torn apart; one is slipped beneath the guideways 282 and 284 adjacent pushbutt-ons 24; the second is slipped beneath the transparent plate 30 or 32 so that each players name will appear adjacent his frame-to-frame score; and the third will be given to the bowling alley proprietor or used as a spare. Thus, even though the score sheet is blank one of the player tabs will be inserted over it so that the players names will be projected onto the screens just as if they were entered directly on the score sheet.

With reference now to FIGS. 16 and 17 another embodiment of the projector is shown wherein the score is projected onto ground glass screens 302 and 304 at the back of a casing 306 for the projector. With this arrangement, the score sheet beneath the transparent plate 30, for example, may be projected onto screen 302; whereas that beneath the transparent plate 32 may be projected onto screen 304.

The lighting means for the projector is the same as that shown in FIG. 3 and comprises a mercury arc lamp 82 together with a lower housing 56 and upper reflector 86. A blower, not shown, is connected through conduit 3- to the housing 56 such that a stream of cooling air will be blown across the tops of the transparent plates. Thus, this part of the projector of FIGS. 16 and 17 is the same as that shown in FIG. 3. In this case, however, the image of the score sheet is reflected from a first mirror 308 and thereafter passes through a lens system 310 where it is reduced in size and intensified. From the lens system 310 the image is reflected from mirrors 312, 314 and 316 onto the ground glass screen 304. The mirror system for the other alley will be similar to that shown except that the mirrors will be arranged to project the image of the other score sheet onto the upper ground glass screen 302. The arrangement of the mirrors 308, 312, 314 and 316 as shown herein is for illustrative purposes only, it being understood that any suitable optical system may be employed which will project an image of the score sheet onto an associated one of the screens 302 or 304.

Although the invention has been shown in connection with certain specific embodiments, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes in form and arrangement of parts may be made to suit requirements without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. Optical projector means for projecting onto a screen light reflected from parallel sheets of paper lying in a common plane, comprising plates of transparent material spaced apart in a common plane, means for positioning said sheets beneath the plates of transparent material in side-by-side relationship, a source of light extending along a generally straight line above and between the transparent plates and substantially parallel to one transverse dimension of each plate, reflector means having a cross section forming an arc of a circle beneath said source of light, parabolic reflectors above the light source for directing light through the transparent plates and onto said sheets, lens means for focusing light reflected from said sheets onto said screens, skirts depending downwardly from the edges of said first-mentioned reflector means to provide a housing beneath the first-mentioned reflector means, said skirts defining slots adjacent the upper surfaces of said transparent plates, and means for forcing fluid under pressure into said housing whereby the fluid will be forced through said slots and across the tops of said transparent plates to cool the same.

2. The combination of printing means and optical profrom a sheet of paper or the like having a non-illuminated background and material printed thereon by the printing means, comprising a source of light, means for directing said light onto the sheet of paper or the like, lens means for focusing the light reflected from said sheet of paper or the like onto said screen, a transparent plate positioned over the surface of said sheet of paper or the like and parallel thereto, said transparent plate having an upper surface provided with a film adapted to reflect infrared rays and pass the remainder of the light, the transparent plate also having a lower surface provided with a film which minimizes the reflection of light at the lower surface thereof, means for directing a stream of cooling fluid over a surface of said transparent plate, an opaque plate beneath said sheet of paper or the like and parallel thereto, said opaque plate having an aperture therein, printing means adapted to project through said aperture and print characters on the underside of said sheet of paper or the like, and means for urging said opaque plate into close abutting relationship with the underside of said sheet of paper or the like whereby the upper surface of said sheet of paper will be urged into close abutting relationship with the lower surface of said transparent plate.

3. The combination of printing means and optical projector means for projecting onto a screen light reflected from parallel sheets of paper having material printed thereon by the printing means and lying in a common plane, comprising plates of transparent material, means for positioning said sheets beneath the plates of transparent material in side-by-side relationship, a source of light extending along a generally straight line above and betweenthe transparent plates and substantially parallel to one transverse dimension of each plate, reflector means having a cross section forming an arc of a circle beneath said source of light, parabolic reflectors above the source of light for directing light through the transparent plates and onto said sheets, lens means for focusing light reflected from said sheets onto said screens, skirts depending downwardly from the edges of said first-mentioned reflector means to provide a housing beneath the firstmentioned reflector means, said skirts defining slots adjacent the upper surfaces of said transparent plates, means for forcing fluid under pressure into said housing whereby the fluid will be forced through said slots and across the tops of said transparent plates to cool the same, opaque plates positioned beneath said sheets and parallel thereto, each of said plates having an aperture therein, printing means adapted to project through said apertures and print characters on said sheets, and means for urging said opaque plates upwardly into close abutting relationship with the undersides of said sheets whereby the upper surfaces of said sheets are urged into close abutting relationship with the undersides of said transparent plates.

4. In optical projector means for projecting onto a screen light reflected from the surface of a sheet of paper or the like having a non-illuminated background and printed material thereon, the combination of a plate of transparent material positioned adjacent one side of the sheet of paper or the like and parallel thereto, an opaque plate positioned adjacent the other side of the sheet and parallel thereto, an inflatable light-colored bag interposed between said sheet and said opaque plate whereby the inflated bag will force the sheet into snug-abutting relationship with the transparent plate, said inflatable bag and said opaque plate each having a centrally-located aperture therein through which printing means may project to print characters on said sheet, a source of light above the transparent plate, reflector means for directing light from said source through said transparent plate and onto 7 the sheet of paper or the like which is held in snug-abutting relationship with the transparent plate, and lens means for focusing light reflected from said sheet of paper or the like onto said screen.

5. In optical projector means for projecting onto a screen light reflected from the surface of a sheet of paper or the like having a non-illuminated background and printed characters thereon, the combination of a transparent plate positioned above the sheet and parallel thereto, an opaque plate positioned adjacent the underside of the sheet and parallel thereto, means including an inflatable bag of light-colored material interposed between the opaque plate and said sheet for forcing the sheet into snug-abutting relationship with the underside of the transparent plate, said inflatable bag and the opaque plate each having a centrally-located aperture therein through which printing means may project to print characters on said sheet, a source of light above the transparent plate, reflector means for directing light from said source through said transparent plate and onto the sheet of paper or the like, lens means for focusing light reflected from said sheet of paper or the like onto said screen, and means for directing a stream of cooling fluid across the top of said transparent plate to prevent scorching of the sheet of paper or the like under the transparent plate.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,342,894 6/1920 Bugbee 8824 1,962,805 6/1934 Chenicek et a1. 8824 2,230,572 2/1941 Mestre 88-24 2,395,561 2/ 1946 Osterberg et a1 8824 2,405,168 8/1946 Schuler 88-25 2,468,679 4/ 1949 Martin 8824 2,570,507 9/ 195 1 Audreoli 8824 2,591,449 4/1952 Ludwig 76 2,685,227 8/ 1954 Brietzke. 2,720,136 9/1955 Frank et al 8824 2,738,703 3/ 1956 Zorn 88--24 2,811,892 11/ 1957 Holloway 88-24 3,089,413 5/1963 MacNeill et a1. 10193 3,091,457 5/1963 Mentzer eta1. 27354 3,091,458 5/ 1963 Becks 27354 3,092,020 6/1963 Borutzke et a1. 10193 FOREIGN PATENTS 550,365 9/1956 Belgium. JULIA E. COINER, Primary Examiner. DELBERT B. LOWE, Examiner.

A. O. OECHSLE, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3362286 *May 24, 1965Jan 9, 1968Cleveland Trust CoAutomatic bowling score projector
US4468105 *Apr 7, 1982Aug 28, 1984Constantin Systems, Inc.Opaque projector
US5882263 *Dec 18, 1995Mar 16, 1999Chung; Te-HengAudio-video-colorful multimedia system for bowling alleys
USRE32648 *Aug 25, 1986Apr 19, 1988Constantin Systems, Inc.Opaque projector
Classifications
U.S. Classification353/54, 353/95, 353/99, 353/45, 353/DIG.500, 353/DIG.400, 473/54, 353/66, 353/89, 473/70
International ClassificationG03B21/00, A63D5/04
Cooperative ClassificationG03B21/00, Y10S353/05, A63D5/04, Y10S353/04
European ClassificationG03B21/00, A63D5/04