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Publication numberUS3258217 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1966
Filing dateMar 27, 1964
Priority dateMar 27, 1964
Publication numberUS 3258217 A, US 3258217A, US-A-3258217, US3258217 A, US3258217A
InventorsSoloduk Fred, Fulton H Macarthur, Fuertig Rudolph
Original AssigneeFrank W Egan & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Single drum web winding machine
US 3258217 A
Images(8)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

8 Sheets-Sheet 1 June 28, 1966 F. H. M ARTHUR ETAL SINGLE DRUM WEB WINDING MACHINE Filed March 27, 1964 INVENTORS.

OLUDUK FUL 7011/ H. MACARTHUR FRED WWW w n g? Q Q x mg June 28, 1966 F. H. M ARTHUR ETAL 3,253,217

SINGLE DRUM WEB WINDING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 27, 1964 UT v,

N. H A Di m w m June 28, 1966 F. H. M ARTHUR ETAL 3,258,217

SINGLE DRUM WEB WINDING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 27, 1964 INVENTORS. F01 TON MAO/1K7 hUA FRED SMfiDl/K BY RUDOLPH Fill-R776 I 5 i g Arm/aver June 28, 1966 F. H. M ARTHUR ETAL 3,258,217

SINGLE DRUM WEB WINDING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed March 27, 1.964

June 28, 1966 F. H. MaOARTHUR ETAL 3,258,217

SINGLE DRUM WEB WINDING MACHINE f-PED 5 0L 000K BY ,Pl/DOL PH FOE/P77 6- M W4 TTORME) 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 F. H. M ARTHUR ETAL SINGLE DRUM WEB WINDING MACHINE June 28, 1966 Filed March 27, 1964 United States Patent 3,258,217 SINGLE DRUM WEB WKNDING MACHINE Fulton H. MacArthur, Glen Ridge, Fred Soloduk, Belle Mead, and Rudolph Fuertig, East Brunswick, N.J., as-

signors to Frank W. Egan & Company, Somerville,

N.J., a corporation of New Jersey Filed Mar. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 355,180 9 Claims. (Cl. 242-65) This invention relates to improvements in winding machines and, in particular, to improvements in the type of winder known as a single drum winder or Pope Reel, as shown in United States Patent No. 1,248,542. Winders of this type are used in the industry to wind up rolls of paper and paperboard that have been made on a paper making machine and to wind up rolls of paper, paperboard, or plastic that have been processed on coating, laminating, printing, and other types of machinery. The winder includes a driven winding drum, primary arms which support the new roll core, means to force the new roll core into contact with the moving web on the winding drum, secondary arms or guide ways to receive the new roll core from the primary arms after winding has started and means to hold the winding roll in contact with the winding drum during .the winding process.

A problem that occurs in the known winders of this type is that of minimizing the deflection of the shaft or mandrel on which the web is wound or which supports the core on which the web is wound. Considerable pressure must be applied between the mandrel and the winding drum in order to transfer the web to the new mandrel and to obtain the resquired amount of tension in the wound roll. This pressure is applied to the ends of the mandrel and causes a deflection of the mandrel which results in an uneven pressure pattern between the mandrel and the winding drum, this pressure being high at the edges and low at the center of the drum. Under these conditions it is difficult to make a satisfactory transfer of the web to the new core, since the contact pressure at the center of the web is too low to obtain adhesion of the web to the adhesive on the new mandrel or core. This is especially critical when winding a web which has been slit into multiple strips in which case the outside strips will transfor to the new core or mandrel, but the center strips will not transfer and will continue to wind on the finished roll, necessitating a machine shut-down. Another consequence of the uneven pressure between mandrel and winding drum is that the web tension differs between the edges or outside strips of the web and the center or center strips of the web, resulting in a soft center and hard edges of the wound roll in the case of a full width web and rolls of varying degrees of hardness, in the case of a multiple strip web.

Additional mandrel deflection occurs in the secondary winding position where the increasing weight of the roll or rolls being wound causes a downward deflection of the mandrel due to gravity. This additional deflection also results in uneven'tension across the web or webs.

Heretofore, it has been necessary to use mandrels of large diameters and, therefore of greater rigidity in order to overcome these difficulties, and these mandrels are in the range of 6 inches to 16 inches in diameter, depending on the width of the web being wound. However, in many operations it is necessary that the web or webs be wound on cores of small diameter such as 3 inches to inches, in order that the wound rolls can be used in subsequent operations which require small diameter cores. For example, in the newspaper preprint industry, webs of newsprint are preprinted, slit into multiple widths and wound into rolls. These rolls .are .then shipped to various newspaper printing plants and chucked in conventional ice newspaper press unwinding machines and the preprinted webs are inserted into the newspaper that is being printed. The unwinding machines are designed to accept only rolls wound on small diameter cores such as are received from .the paper mills and since these unwinding machines are used for both mill rolls and preprintcd rolls, it is impractical to modify them to accommodate preprinted rolls Wound on large diameter cores. It is also required that the winding tension of the preprinted rolls be held to closely controlled tolerances .to control the shrink or stretch of the web so that the preprinting will remain in register with the printed matter of the newspaper in the insertion operation.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide means for obtaining a uniform contact pressure between a new core mandrel and a winding drum in a winding machine, thereby to ensure uniform tension across the web being wound on a core carried by the mandrel.

A further object is'to provide means to obtain a uniform contact pressure between a winding roll and a windmg drum in a winding machine throughout the length of the winding roll.

Another object is to provide novel and improved means to support a winding roll carried by a winding mandrel to minimize deflection of the mandrel.

It is another object to provide winding apparatus which can transfer the web from a finished roll to a new core, while maintaining uniform contact pressure between core and winding drum so as to start the new web uniformly on the new core and wind the new roll with a uniform contact pressure between the roll and the winding drum, and thereby obtain uniform tension across the width of the web and consequent uniform hardness of the wound roll.

A further object is to provide winding apparatus which can transfer .a web which has been slit into multiple widths, from finished rolls onto new cores mounted on a mandrel while maintaining equal and uniform contact pressure between the cores and the winding drum and then wind the new rolls with equal and uniform contact pressure between the rolls and the winding drum so as to obtain wound rolls of equal and uniform hardness.

Other objects are to provide apparatus which will accomplish the above objects when using a small diameter winding mandrel; and to obtain additional advantages and results that will be brought out in the following descriptron in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a winding machine embodying the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the machine of FIGURE 1;

FIGURES 3 and 4 are fragmentary side elevations of portions shown in FIGURE 1 showing parts of the machine in different positions;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse sectional view on the plane of the line 5-5 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a similar view on the plane of the line 6-6 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of a portion shown in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary enlarged side elevation of the hold-down roller assembly;

FIGURES 9, 10 and 11 represent fragmentary side elevations showing a modification of the invention;

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged transverse sectional view on the plane of the line 1212 in FIGURE 9;

FIGURE 13 is a similar view of a modification of the hold-down roller;

FIGURE 14 is a schematic view showing the electrical control circuit and pneumatic piping; and

FIGURE 15 is a schematic fragmentary end elevational view of the cam for operating some of the limit switches.

Referring particularly to FIGURES 1 and 2, the present invention is shown incorporated in a single drum winder used for slitting a paper web into multiple strips and winding the strips side by side into rolls. The winder consists of sideframes 1 and 2 upon which is mounted winding drum 3 journaled in bearing blocks 4 and 5 and driven by conventional means such as motor 6, pulleys 7 and 8, and belts 9. Rotatably mounted on the outer portions of bearing blocks 4 and 5 are quadrants 10 and 11 that are rotated through an arc of about 105 degrees by means of connecting rods 12 and 13, attached to cranks 14 and 15, which are keyed to shaft 16 rotated by means of gear motor 17. The upper portion of each quadrant is cut away to form a seat for the winding mandrel 18 and its bearings 19 and 20. Mandrel bearings 19 and 20 are held in position by pins 21 and 21a, and levers 22 and 23. Pins 21 and 21:: are slidably mounted in quadrants 10 and 11 and have afiixed to their lower ends, cam rollers 24 and 25 which ride on stationary cam surfaces 26 and 27 mounted on bearing blocks 4 and 5. Levers 22 and 23 are pivotally mounted on the quadrants 10 and 11 and are actuated by means of fluid cylinders 28 and 29 whose lower ends are pivotally mounted on the lower portion of the quadrants.

On top of the frames 1 and 2 are tracks 30 and 31 providing support means for mandrel 18 in the winding position. Pressure is applied between the winding roll and the winding drum 3 by means of rollers 32 and 33 rotatably mounted on arms 34 and 35 both of which are fixed .to shaft 36 and pressure is applied to arms 34 and 35 through the medium of fluid cylinders 37 and 38 whose head ends are pivotally mounted in brackets 39 and 40, fixed to frames 1 and 2. Fixed to arms 34 and 35 are arms 41 at the end of which are pivoted arms 43 holding rollers 45, whose purpose is to move the finished wound roll away from the winding drum after the web is transferred to a new mandrel. Arms 43 are held in the position shown in FIGURE 1 by springs 47 and stop pins 48.

At the discharge end of the winder the finished rolls are lowered to floor level by holders 49 and 50, which are slidably mounted on frames 1 and 2 and controlled by fluid cylinders 51 and 52. At the entrance end of the winder are idler rolls 53 and 54, conventional web slitters shown generally as 55 and 56, and idler roll 57 which is preferably of the type known as an expander roll that tends to stretch the web laterally.

On top of frames 1 and 2 are fixed brackets 58 and 59 between which is mounted cross piece 60. As can be seen on FIGURE 2 and enlarged view, FIGURE 8, bracket 61 is atfixed to cross piece at its central portion and serves as a support for fluid cylinder 62 and also as a support for pin 63 about which lever 64 can rotate. Cylinder 62 is attached to lever 64 by means of clevis 65 and pin 66, and is capable of rotating lever 64 about pin 63 through approximately 100 degrees of rotation. Shaft 67 is fixed at the end of lever 64 and at each end is rotatably mounted a holddown roller 68 for exerting downward pressure on the winding mandrel 18 through the core and the winding roll.

Between frames 1 and 2 is a roll 69 journaled in bearings mounted on the ends of arms 70 and 71 which are fixed to a rotatable shaft 72 at their opposite ends. Also fixed to shaft 72 are arms 73 and 74 which are attached by clevises and pins to fluid cylinders 75 and 76, the head ends of which are pivotally attached to brackets 77 and 78 fixed to cross piece 79 between frames 1 and 2. Roll 69 is, therefore, enabled to move from approximately a horizontal position in relation to shaft 72 (FIGURE 1) to a position nearly vertical to '72 (FIGURE 4). At one end of the shaft 72 an adjustable cam 80 is clamped and this cam operates a cam follower which is part of pneumatic regulating valve 81, which controls the air pressure delivered to cylinders of fluid pressure motors 75 and 76 through pipes not shown.

Operation of the machine may best be understood by reference to FIGURES 1, 3, and 4. Cores 84 of suitable material such :as cardboard have spots of adhesive 85, or pieces of double faced adhesive, applied thereto in a known manner and are placed on the mandrel 18 as best shown in FIGURES 5 and 12; and the mandrel with the cores thereon is placed in the loading position shown in FIGURE 1 with the bearings 19 and 20 held between the pins 21, 21a and levers 22, 23, the cores being held away from contact with the winding drum by the pins, which as above described, are positioned by rollers 24, 25 and cams 26, 27. Paper web 82 enters the machine at lower left, passing around idler roll 53 and then upward through slitters 55 and 56, which may be of any conventional type, preferably rotary as shown. Two sets of slitters are shown here as it is sometimes desired to remove a narrow strip of the web when slitting, and it is not possible in many cases to set the slitters close enough on one shaft to achieve a very narrow strip. After leaving the slitters, the multiple webs designated in FIG. 5 as 82a, 82b and 820 pass over idler roll 54 and then under expander roll 57 which acts to slightly separate the slit webs from one another to aid in preventing interleaving in winding. The webs then pass over driven winder drum 3 and the cores 84 are moved to the transfer position by rotation of the quadrants 10 and 11 from the position in FIGURE 1 to the position shown in FIGURE 3 at which point the pins 21, 2111 are moved downwardly by the earns 26, 27 and cam rollers 24, 25 so that the cores come into contact with the webs on the winding drum and the leading ends of the webs are adhesively attached to the cores by the spots of adhesive 85. The adhesive on the cores picks up the webs, and the cores start to wind the webs on the cores.

The hold-down rollers 68 are brought into contact with the Winding rolls on the cores and winding of the rolls 83 continues, the arms 10 and 11 being moved to the right in FIGURE 3 to bring the winding rolls onto the tracks 30 and 31 as shown in FIGURE 4, the pressure of the hold-down rolls 68 having ensured uniform tension in the webs throughout the lengths of the cores during the winding operation so far.

The winding rolls 83 are now held in contact with the winding drum 3 by the arms 34 and 35 which are moved slowly in a direction away from the winding drum as the winding rolls increase in size. During the time of winding as shown in FIGURE 1, the quadrants 10 and 11 are in their furthest counter-clockwise position and hold-down rollers 68 are in their uppermost position. A new mandrel 18 is prepared with adhesive coated cores and is placed in the seats 10a and 11a of quadrants 10 and 11 with mandrel bearings 19 and 20 resting on pins 21 and 21a. Levers 22 and 23 are then rotated in a clockwise direction by fluid cylinders 28 and 29 until they contact the mandrel bearings and hold the mandrel in position. Due to the positions of cams 26 and 27 and rollers 24 and 25, the pins 21 and 21a hold the mandrel away from the winding drum so that the new cores do not contact the webs 82.

When the wound rolls reach the required diameter, the transfer of the webs from the wound rolls to the new cores is accomplished by the following steps. Hold-down rollers 68 are dropped to their lowermost position by means of fluid cylinder 62, this position being such that the shortest distance between the periphery of the holddown rollers and the webs traveling over the winder drum is slightly less than the outside diameter of the new cores (see FIGURE 1). Quadrants 10 and 11 are then rotated clockwise to a position as shown in FIGURE 3 at which position the new mandrel 18 has moved toward the center of the winder drum through retraction of pins 21 and 21a by the motion of cam followers 24 and 25 following the contour of cams 26 and 27, and the new cores are brought into contact with the webs on the winder drum 3.

Pressure is exerted between the cores and the winder drum by the levers 22 and 23 pressing down upon the mandrel bearings 19 and 20. Simultaneously the new cores on mandrel 18 are brought into contact with holddown rollers 68 which exert a pressure on the cores against the winder drum at the central portion of the mandrel and, therefore, prevent deflection of mandrel 18 caused by the downward pressure at its end portions, which results in a uniform contact pressure between the new cores and the winder drum throughout their length.

When the adhesive coated portions of the new cores contact the webs traveling on the winder drum 3, the webs adhere to the new cores, severing the web between the new cores and the wound rolls 83, and start to wind on the new cores. Arms 34 and 35 are then rotated toward the discharge end of the winder and rollers 45 and 46 contact the mandrel bearings 19 and 20 and move the wound rolls to the position shown as 83a where the mandrel bearings rest in holders 49 and 50. The rolls 83 can then be lowered to floor level by means of cylinders 51 and 52.

After the new winding rolls have wound for a short time, rollers 68 are raised to their original position and quadrants and 11 are rotated clockwise until they reach the position shown in FIGURE 4 where the mandrel bearings 19 and 20 are supported on tracks 30 and 31. Arms 34 and 35 are moved toward the winder drum 3 and rollers 45 and 46 contact mandrel bearings 19 and 20, at which time arms 43 and 44 pivot clockwise, dropping rollers 45 and 46 and allow them to pass under the mandrel bearings. Movement of arms 34 and 35 continues until rollers 32 and 33 contact the mandrel bearings and begin to apply pressure to the mandrel against the winder drum. Levers 22 and 23 are then opened (see FIGURE 4) and quadrants 10 and 11 are rotated counterclockwise to their original position in readiness to accept a new mandrel.

At the same time that arms 34 and 35 are moved toward the winder drums, roll 69 is raised until it contacts the new rolls being wound. As the rolls increase in size and are moved away from the winder drum 3, the roll 69 is forced downward against the pressure exerted by the cylinders 75 and 76. This pressure is varied by the action of cam 80 on pressure regulating valve 81 and the contour of the cam is designed so that the pressure increases as roll 69 moves downward in such a manner as to compensate for the increasing weight of the winding rolls and to prevent deflection of the mandrel 18 due to the weight of these rolls.

A modification of this invention is shown in FIGURES 9, 10 and 11 which correspond respectively to FIGURES 1, 3 and 4. In this modification crosspiece 60a is fixed between quadrants 10 and 11 and rotates with the quadrants instead of remaining fixed on the frame. Bracket 61, cylinder 62, lever 64, and rollers 68 remain as before. Operation of the winder is similar to that given above except that rollers 68 are brought into contact with the new cores in the position shown as FIGURE 9. They then remain in contact with the cores and subsequently the new winding rolls throughout the transfer and the subsequent movement of the quadrants 10 and 11 until the new winding rolls are deposited on the tracks 30 and 31 (see FIGURE 11). At this time roll 69 is raised to contact the winding rolls as shown in FIGURE 11 and lever 64 may be opened and quadrants 10 and 11 rotated counterclockwise to their original position, and the subsequent operation is continued as before. This modification permits the control of pressure on the mandrel throughout the entire transfer and winding cycle of the winder.

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged view of the mandrel 18 with its bearings 19 and 20 and showing another modification which consists of the use of multiple sets of holddown rollers shown as 68a and 68b which arrangement is of value for use with very long mandrels of small diameter. Cores 84 are installed on mandrel 18 and locked in place by conventional means not shown and adhesive 85 is applied to the cores in preparation for the transfer.

FIGURE 13 shows another modification wherein rollers 68 have been replaced by roll 86 having larger diameter sections 87 to provide clearance for the adhesive areas 85.

The control of the operating sequences of the winder can be of conventional types comprising combinations of electrical, pneumatic, and hydraulic components and preferably should be as automatic as practical so that the operator is required to manually operate as few controls as possible.

The now preferred electrical control circuit and pneumatic piping diagram are shown in FIGURES 14 and'15. Operation is as follows:

Assuming the winder to be in position shown in FIG- URE 1, except that new mandrel and cores 18 and 19 have not yet been loaded into arms 10 and 11. Support roll 69 is held up against the winding roll 83 by cylinders 75 and 76 controlled by cam operated air valve 81 and cam 80 as described earlier. Cam 80 is adjustable and may be set to give any desired movement to the cam follower on valve 81 so that any desired air pressure may be applied to cylinders 75 and 76 at any position of the cam, which position corresponds to the size of the winding roll. This pressure is indicated on gauge and is set upon initial startup of the Winder, it being necessary to change this adjustment only when winding webs of narrower overall width than normal. Air regulator and gauge 101 act to supply a source of constant pressure air to pressure regulating valve 81. It is, therefore, evident that the roll 69 will always be held in contact with the winding roll 83 from. the time it is deposited on the horizontal tracks 30 and 31 until it is moved away from the winding drum 3 towards the unloading saddles 49 and 50, at which time roll 69 will move up into position to be ready to contact the new winding roll when it is deposited on the horizontal tracks, all without any attention from the operator.

The hold-down rollers 68 and the mandrel clamps 22 and 23 are held in the open positions by cylinders 62 and 28 and 29 which are controlled by solenoid operated valves 102 and 103. These solenoid valves are of the type that operate on a momentary electrical impulse and will remain in position until another pulse in the opposite direction is received. They are controlled by clamp switch 104 which is a three-position selector switch with spring return to the center or off position. Air regulators and gauges 105 and 106 control the air pressures to the cylinders 62, 28 and 29.

Winding arm switch 107 is a five-position selector switch which remains in whatever position set and controlssolenoid valve 108 which is a spring return to neutral type and, therefore, remains in either out or tension position only as long as it is energized in those directions. Air regulator and gauge 109 controls the air pressure to cylinders 37 and 38 when the cylinders are moving arms 34 and 35 toward the discharge end of the winder or out direction while air regulator and gauge 110 control the air pressure to the same cylinders when moving the arms toward the winding drum or tension direction. Air regulating valves 111 allow the independent adjustment of air pressure to cylinders 37 and 38 while exhaust valves 112 provide a means of exhausting the air from the cylinders when moving in the out direction. Speed control valve 113 allows the adjustment of the operating speed of the cylinders when moving in the out direction. In the position of FIGURE 1, switch 107 is set in the in run position, energizing the tension solenoid of solenoid valve 108 and, therefore, putting air pressure on the cylinders through valves 109, 108 and 111.

The new mandrel and cores 18 are now loaded into the arms 10 and 11 and switch 104 is momentarily turned to the close position, energizing the close solenoids of valves 102 and 103 and thus applying air pressure to cylinder 62 to lower the hold down rollers and to cylinders 28 and 29 to clamp the mandrel in position. The winder is now ready for the transfer operation and when it is desired to make the transfer, transfer pushbutton 116 is pressed and held. This energizes motor starter 118 which operates gear motor 17, rotating shaft 16 and rotating arms 10 and 11 until the new mandrel and core are in the transfer position as shown in FIGURE 3. The motor is stopped at the transfer position by limit switch LS-1 which is opened at the correct position by cam 119 mounted on shaft 16, this breaking the circuit to the motor starter 118. At the same time the normally open contact of LS-1 closes and energizes time delay relay 117 which is then held in by instantaneous contact 118a. After relay 117 times out, contact 119a closes and energizes the open solenoid of valve 102, reversing the air to cylinder 62 and raising the hold-down rollers out of contact with the new winding roll. The transfer having been made, winding arm switch 107 is turned to the out jog position, energizing the out solenoid of valve 108 through limit switch LS-S and, therefore, moving the finished wound roll toward the discharge end of the winder. When the finished roll has reached a position such that the distance between this roll and the winding drum is greater than that required to clear the new roll when moved to the horizontal position, limit switch LS-S opens r le-energizing the out solenoid of valve 108 and stopping the motion of cylinders 37 and 38. At the same time the normally open contact of LS-S closes and sets up the circuit to the wind pushbutton 115.

Wind pushbutton 115 is then pressed and held, energizing motor starter 118 and continuing the rotation of arms 10 and 11 until the new winding roll is deposited on the horizontal tracks as shown in FIGURE 4. At this point limit switch LS-2 opens and stops the rotation. The winding arm switch is then turned to out run which energizes the out solenoid of valve 108 which results in moving the finished roll toward the discharge end and depositing it in the unloading cradles 49 and 50.

Limit switch LS-4 is a safety switch closed only when the cradles are in upper position and thus prevent the above movement of the finished roll unless the cradles are in position to receive it. The winding arm switch 107 is then turned to in run which energizes the tension solenoid of valve 108 returning the arms 34 and 35 toward the winding drum until the rollers 32 and 33 contact the new winding mandrel 18 and begin to exert pressure against the mandrel to provide winding pressure of the winding roll against the winding drum, this pressure up to this point in the cycle having been supplied by arms 22 and 23.

Clamp switch 104 is momentarily turned to open which shifts solenoid valve 102 to open position, reversing the air to cylinder 62 and opening mandrel clamps 22 and 23. Load pushbutton 114 is then pressed, again energizing motor starter 118 and since crank 12 has passed over center on shaft 16, the motor rotates arms 10 and 11 back to the original loading position where limit switch LS-3 opens an stops the rotation.

The finished roll may now be lowered to the floor by use of manual air valve 120 which works through the conventional air-hydraulic circuit shown.

The above circuits may be modified as for instance in the case of the machine modification described hereinbefore in conjunction with FIGURES 9, 10 and 11. In this form of the invention the time delay relay may be omitted since the hold-down rollers will remain in contact with the winding roll until released at the same time as the mandrel clamps.

We claim:

1. A web winding machine comprising a frame, a winding drum journaled on said frame over which the web passes, a core-mandrel cooperative with and rotatable by said winding drum, core-mandrel-holding means movably mounted on the frame to support said mandrel at its ends and to move the core-mandrel successively from a starting position out of contact with the winding drum to a transfer position into contact with the web on the winding drum to begin winding of the web on the core-mandrel and thence to a winding position where winding is continued with the wound roll in contact with the winding drum, a wound-roll support in said winding position onto which said mandrel and wound roll are deposited from said core-mandrel-holding means, means yieldingly holding said wound roll in contact with said winding drum and permitting movement of the core-mandrel away from the winding drum as the roll is wound, and means for exerting pressure on said core-mandrel between its ends to provide uniform contact pressure between the core-mandrel and the winding drum throughout the length of the core mandrel, the last-named means comprising a holddown roller, a lever pivotally mounted on said core-mandrel-holding means and on which said hold-down roller is mounted, and means for actuating said lever to move and hold the hold-down roller in contact with the coremandrel during the movement of the core-mandrel from said starting position to said winding position and to move the holddown roller away from the core-mandrel and back to said starting position simultaneously with the return of said mandrel-holding means to the mandrel starting position.

2. A web winding machine comprising a frame, a winding drum journaled on said frame over which the web passes, a core-mandrel cooperative with and rotatable by said winding drum, core-mandrel-holding means movably mounted on the frameto support said mandrel at its ends and to move the core-mandrel successively from a starting position out of contact with the winding drum to a transfer position into contact with the web on the winding drum to begin winding of the web on the coremandrel and thence to a winding position where winding is continued with the wound roll in contact with the winding drum, a wound-roll support in said winding position onto which said mandrel and wound roll are deposited from said core-mandrel-holding means, means yieldingly holding said wound roll in contact with said winding drum and permitting movement of the coremandrel away from the winding drum as the roll is wound, and means for exerting pressure on said core-mandrel between its ends to provide uniform contact pressure between the core-mandrel and the winding drum throughout the length of the core-mandrel with the addition of a support-roller to contact with and support said wound roll intermediate its ends while the latter is in said winding position on said wound roll support, and means to move said roller into contact with said wound roll in timed relation to movement of the wound roll onto said wound-roll support.

3. A web winding machine as defined in claim 2 wherein the last-named means includes a pair of arms pivotally mounted on a frame on a common axis and supporting said roller between them, a fluid pressure motor connected to said arms and actuating them to move the roller into contact with the wound roll, a valve controlling said fluid pressure motor and means actuated by said arms for operating said valve.

4. A web winding machine as defined in claim 3.wherein said valve is a pressure regulating valve and the lastnamed means actuated by said arms is a cam for actuating the valve to regulate the fluid pressure supplied to said fluid pressure motor for varying the pressure of contact of the support-roller with the wound roll in accordance with the variations in the diameter of said wound roll.

5. A web winding machine comprising a frame, a winding drum journaled on said frame over which the web passes, a core-mandrel cooperative with and rotatable by said Winding drum, core-mandrel-holding means movably mounted on the frame to support said mandrel at its ends and to move the core-mandrel successively from a starting position out of contact with the winding drum to a transfer position into contact with the web on the winding drum to begin winding of the web on the core-mandrel and thence to a winding position where winding is continued with the wound roll in contact with the winding drum, a wound-roll support in said winding position onto which said mandrel and wound roll are deposited from said core-mandrel-holding means, means yieldingly holding said wound roll in contact with said winding drum and permitting movement of the core-mandrel away from the winding drum as the roll is wound, and means for exerting pressure on said core-mandrel between its ends to provide uniform contact pressure between the core-mandrel and the winding drum throughout the length of the core-mandrel, with the addition of a support-roller to contact with and support said wound roll intermediate its ends while the latter is in said winding position on said wound roll support, and means to move said roller into contact with said wound roll in timed relation to movement of the wound roll onto said wound-roll support, and means for varying the pressure of contact of the support-roller with the wound roll in accordance with variations in the diameter of said wound roll.

6. A web winding machine comprising a frame, a winding drum journaled on said frame over which the web passes, a core-mandrel cooperative with and rotatable by said winding drum, core-mandrel-holding means movably mounted on the frame'to support said mandrel at its ends and to move the core-mandrel successively from a starting position out of contact with the winding drum to a transfer position into contact with the web on the winding drum to begin winding of the web on the core-mandrel and thence to a Winding position where winding is continued with the wound roll in contact with winding drum, a wound-roll support in said winding position onto which said mandrel and wound roll are deposited from said core-mandrel-holding means, means yieldingly holding said wound roll in contact with said winding drum and permitting movement of the core-mandrel away from the winding drum as the roll is Wound, and means mounted on said frame for exerting pressure on said core-mandrel between its ends to provide uniform contact pressure between the core-mandrel and the winding drum throughout the length of the core-mandrel, wherein the last-named means comprises at least one holddown roller and means including a lever upon which said hold-down roller is mounted, a fluid pressure motor connected to said lever, a valve controlling said fluid pressure motor and means operating said valve in timed relation to the movement of said core-'mandrel-holding means for moving aid hold-down roller into position for rolling contact with the core-mandrel at said transfer position, holding the hold-down roller in contact with the core-mandrel and the web thereon while the coremandrel is at said transfer position and moving said hold-down roller away from the core-mandrel and web wound thereon.

7. A web winding machine as defined in claim 1, with the addition of a support-roller to contact with and support said wound roll intermediate its ends while the latter is in said winding position on said wound roll support, means to move said support-roller into contact with said wound roll in timed relation to movement of the wound roll onto said wound-roll support.

8. A web winding machine as defined in claim 1, with the addition of a support-roller to contact with and support said wound roll intermediate its ends while the latter is in said winding position on said wound roll support, means to move said support-roller into contact with said wound roll in timed relation to movement of the wound roll onto said wound-roll support, and under pressure varying in accordance with variations in the diameter of said wound roll.

9. A web winding machine as defined in claim 6 with the addition of a support-roller to contact with and support said wound roll intermediate its ends while the latter is in said winding position on said wound roll support, means to move said support-roller into contact With said wound roll in timed relation to movement of the wound roll onto said wound-roll support, and means for varying the pressure of contact of the support-roller with the wound roll in accordance with variations in the diameter of said Wound roll.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,520,826 8/1950 Beck 242 2,579,199 12/1951 Marcalus 24265 X 3,103,321 9/1963 Jilek 242-65 3,116,031 12/1963 Moore et a1. 242-65 3,202,374 8/1965 Phelps 242-65 MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.

W. S. BURDEN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/541.7, 242/542.3
International ClassificationB65H19/22, B65H18/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2408/236, B65H2301/4148, B65H2408/2364, B65H19/2261, B65H18/16
European ClassificationB65H18/16, B65H19/22B4B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 8, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: LEESONA CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:JOHN BROWN INDUSTRIES LTD.;REEL/FRAME:003936/0238
Effective date: 19810331
May 15, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: JOHN BROWN INDUSTRIES LTD.; 100 WEST TENTH ST., WI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:LEESONA CORPORATION; 333 STRAWBERRY FIELD RD., WARWICK, RI. A CORP. OF MA.;REEL/FRAME:003936/0206
Effective date: 19810501