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Publication numberUS3259297 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1966
Filing dateNov 4, 1964
Priority dateNov 4, 1964
Publication numberUS 3259297 A, US 3259297A, US-A-3259297, US3259297 A, US3259297A
InventorsKalajian Edward A
Original AssigneeKalajian Edward A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid carton and straw combination
US 3259297 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5, 1966 E. A. KALAJIAN LIQUID CARTON AND STRAW COMBINATION Filed Nov. 4, 1964 INVENTOR. E DIM/1E0 A. (MAJ/AN BY ran/45F, (M0555 4- GAMBFA'LL ATTOFNE/S'.

United States Patent 3,259,297 LIQUID CARTON AND STRAW OOMBINATTUN Edward A. Kalajian, 9016 W. Pico lilvd, Los Angeles, Calif. Filed Nov. 4, 1964, Ser. No. iiliifiidfi 6 Claims. (Cl. 229-7) This invention relates to liquid cartons such as those made from heavy gauge paper or similar material suitably impregnated or coated with wax, plastic, etc. so as to be liquid tight, and more specifically has reference to the combination of a liquid carton with a straw contained within it.

Considerable attention has been given to providing the conventional milk or juice carton with a built-in straw to avoid the necessity of a separate straw or drinking cup in the absence of which the user must place the carton to mouth. The fundamental problem is the useable builtin straw must be longer than the carton. The solution usually suggested for this problem is the use of straws of special construction and connection with the container, such as straws having telescoping portions and straws which can be bent within the carton and straightened when the carton is opened. Probably the most significant impediment to providing such solutions tothe built-in straw problem is the economic factor: the relatively high cost of special straw construction, and the compatibility of incorporating them in milk and juice cartons which are mass produced in the millions by automatic machines as throw-away items. A fraction of a cent added cost can be very significant.

I have invented a carton and built-in straw combination which solves the fundamental problem without requiring a special straw construction and without requiring extensive modifications of or additions to the carton. This is accomplished through recognition of the fact that most cartons have a height which is substantially greater than their width and of the fact that such a carton may be turned on its side when using the builtin straw.

In accordance with my invention, an opening tab extends along a side wall of the carton for a substantial vertical distance and has an exposed free end which may be manually grasped and pulled to open the side wall of the carton. A straw is disposed approximately vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab. The straw has an overall length which substantially exceeds the width of the carton, and is connected at a position intermediate its ends to the opening tab at a position remote from the exposed free end of the tab. Thus, the carton may be turned on its side, and the opening tab may be pulled to open the upper side of the carton and pivot the straw to an upright position, the straw having a sufficient length to protrude from the carton and to span the depth of the liquid in the carton.

In a preferred embodiment of my invention, the free end of the opening tab is disposed adjacent the top wall of the carton and the body of the tab is defined by a pair of scaled vertical tear lines formed in a side wall of the carton and spaced apart in parallel and coextensive relationship a distance in excess of the diameter of the straw. The tear lines terminate at the same elevation which defines ta fixed end for the tab. The straw is a conventional straight straw suitably coated or impregnated to prevent deterioration from exposure to the liquid. The straw has upper and lower end portions of substantial length, these end portions being free from the carton. The lower end portion has a length which is at least approximately equal to the width of the carton, and the upper end portion of the straw has a length which is at most approximately equal to the vertical dis- 3,259,297 Patented July 5, 1966 tance which the tab extends along the side wall. The straw is connected at a position intermediatethese end portions to the opening tab, at a position on the tap which is adjacent the fixed end of the tab.

The present invention will be more clearly understood by referring to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which;

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the carton and straw combination of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional elevation taken along line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but showing the carton on its side with the opening tab in the opened position; and,

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 44 of FIG. 2.

Referring to the drawing, a conventional milk or juice carton is in the form of a rectangular parallelepiped, having a top wall 10, a bottom wall 12, and four side walls 14, 16, 18, 20. The height H of the carton substantially exceeds its width W. In the top wall 10 of the carton adjacent one corner where the side walls 14, 116 intersect, the carton has a conventional tab sealed pouring spout arrangement 22. In other forms of conventional milk or juice cartons the top wall is not fiat and the pouring spout is formed by folded portions of the top wall. This form is not shown, but will be familiar to the general public due to its wide use.

Adjacent a different corner, defined by the intersection of the side walls 16, 18 of the carton, an opening tab 23 extends vertically along the side wall 16 of the carton. The opening tab 23 has an upper exposed free end 24, a body 26 and a lower fixed end 28. A portion of the exposed upper end of the tab and the body of the tab are defined by a pair of sealed vertical tear lines 30, 32 which extend in spaced parallel coextensive relationship from the top of the carton and down the side 16 of the carton, to terminate at a common elevation which defines the fixed end of the tab. The tear lines are par tially perforated lined areas in the side wall 16, sealed by the wax or plastic covering applied in the manufacture of the carton.

A conventional straight straw 33 is disposed vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab 23. The straw is suitably coated or impregnated to be liquid proof. It has an upper end portion 34 and a lower end portion 36, both of substantial length and free of the carton. The upper extremity or end of the straw is disposed adjacent the top of the carton which is adjacent the free end 24 of the tab.

The straw may be connected to the tab by any conventional means which is secure and does not deteriorate in the liquid or contaminate the liquid contained in the carton. As illustrated at 38, the straw is connected to the tab by conventional non-toxic water-proof cement. The point of connection on the straw is substantially intermediate the end portions 34, 36 of the straw. The point of connection on the tab is remote from the free end 24 of the tab, and preferably as shown is adjacent the fixed end 28 of the tab.

As best illustrated in FIG. 3, the carton may be placed on its side 29, and the free end of the opening tab may be grasped and pulled to open the upper side wall 16 of the carton, thereby causing the straw to assume an upright position, ready for use without touching the straw. Obviously, the tear lines 30, 32 are spaced apart a distance in excess of the diameter of the straw so as to permit the upper end portion 34 of the straw to pivot through he opening provided by the tab. The straw pivots to an upright position approximately about the fixed end of the tab and as a result of the reorientation of the connection 38 between the tab and the straw when the tab is pulled.

The upper end portion 34 of the straw, measured between the connection 38 with the tab and the upper extremity of the straw, has a length which preferably is approximately equal to the vertical extent of the tab along the side wall 16. In any event, the length of the upper end portion 34 of the straw, if a straight straw, cannot exceed materially the vertical tab dimension.

The lower end portion 36 of the straw, measured between the connection 38 and the lower extremity of the straw, has a length which is at least approximately equal to the width W of the carton, so that when the carton is on its side the straw spans the then depth of the liquid contained in the carton. Obviously, by extending the tear lines 30, 32 beyond the connection 38, the lower end portion of the straw could be longer and the upper end portion 34 of the straw could be made to protrude farther, all by tearing the tab along the extended tear lines beyond the connection point 38.

By virtue of my invention it will be seen that the conventional carton requires a minimum modification, the straw may be a conventional straight straw, and the connection between the straw and carton is of the simplest nature. As a consequence, the combination may be manufactured with very little modification in existing automatic machinery and at a minimum of added cost.

Location of the tab and straw adjacent a corner remote from the conventional pouring spout serves a two-fold purpose: First, the straw does not interfere with the conventional pouring spout nor does it complicate it since its location is remote. Second, since the straw is located adjacent a corner, the carton when on its side may be tilted toward this corner as the liquid is removed' so as to assure removal of all the liquid.

The location of the tab adjacent the top end of the carton is a convenience, and since cartons are normally stored and transported with the conventional top wall in the upward position, the tendency of liquid leakage is minimized. Also location near an end of the carton further enhances the ability of the straw to remove all of the liquid by means of appropriately tilting the carton.

I claim:

1. A liquid carton having top, bottom and side walls and having a height which is substantially greater than its width; an opening tab extending along a side wall of the carton for a substantial vertical distance, the opening tab having an exposed free end adapted to be manually grasped and pulled to open the side wall of the carton; a straw disposed approximately vertically within the carton adpacent to and in alignment with the opening tab, the straw having an overall length which substantially exceeds the width of the carton; and, means con- .necting the straw at a position intermediate its ends to theopening tab at a position remote from the exposed free end of the tab.

2. A liquid carton having top, bottom and side walls and having a height which is substantially greater than its width; an open-ing tab extending along a side wall of the carton for a substantial vertical distance, the opening tab having a fixed end and having an exposed free end adapted to be manually grasped and pulled to open the side wall of the carton; a straight straw disposed vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab, the upper end of the straw being disposed proximate to the free end of the tab and the straw having a length which substantially exceeds the width of the container; and means connecting the straw to the tab at a position adjacent the fixed end of the tab.

3. A liquid carton having top, bottom and side walls :and having a height which is substantially greater than its width; means including a pair of scaled vertical tear lines formed in a side wall of the carton for defining a vertical opening tab in the side wall, the opening tab having an exposed end adapted to be manually grasped and pulled to tear open the side wall of the carton along said tear lines; a straw disposed approximately vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab, the straw having an overall length which substantially exceeds the width of the carton; and, means connecting the straw at a position intermediate its ends to the opening tab at a position remote from the exposed end of the tab.

4. A liquid carton substantially in the form of a rectangular parallelepiped having top, bottom and side walls and having a conventional sealed pouring spout, the carton having a height which is substantially greater than its width; means defining an opening tab extending vertically along a side wall of the carton at a position remote from the pouring spout and adjacent a corner of the carton; the opening tab having an exposed end adapted to be manually grasped and pulled to open the side wall of the carton; a straw disposed approximately vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab, the straw having an overall length which substantially exceeds the width of the carton; and, means connecting the straw at a'position intermediate its ends to the opening tab at a position remote from the exposed end of the tab.

5. A liquid canton having top, bottom and side walls and having a height which is substantially greater than its width; means defining an opening tab extending from the top and along a side wall of the carton for a substantial vertical distance, the opening tab having an exposed end located adjacent the top of the carton and adapted to be manually grasped and pulled to open the side wall of the carton; a straight straw disposed approximately vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab, the straw having an overall length which substantially exceeds the width of the carton and having an upper end portion and a lower end portion, the upper and lower end portions of the straw being of substantial length and being free from the carton; and means connecting the straw at a position intermediate its end portions to the opening tab at a position remote from the exposed end of the tab.

6. A liquid carton having top, bottom and side walls and having a height which is substantially greater than its width; means defining an opening tab extending from the top and along a side wall of the carton for a substantial vertical distance, the opening tab having an exposed end located adjacent the top of the carton and adapted to be manually grasped and pulled to open the side wall of the carton; a straight straw disposed approximately vertically within the carton adjacent to and in alignment with the opening tab, the straw having an overall length which substantially exceeds the width of the carton and having an upper end portion and a lower end portion, the upper and lower end portions of the straw being of substantial length and being free from the carton, the lower end portion having a length which is at least approximately equal to the width of the carton, and the upper end portion having a length which is at most approximately equal to said vertical distance which the tab extends along said side wall; and, means connecting the straw at a position intermediate its end portions to the opening tab at a position remote from the exposed end of the tab. j l

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,450,244 9/1948 Lynch 2297 2,949,217 8/1960 Pugh. 3,184,134 5/1965 Cohen et al. 2297 3,215,329 11/1965 Pugh 2297 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

D. T. MOORHEAD, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2450244 *Sep 28, 1945Sep 28, 1948Clarence S LynchBeverage container and dispensing device
US2949217 *Oct 7, 1958Aug 16, 1960Pugh Sr William AOne-piece carton and sipper straw holder
US3184134 *Jun 26, 1963May 18, 1965Insco Entpr IncContainer with straw
US3215329 *Nov 29, 1962Nov 2, 1965Pugh Sr William AMilk carton with drinking straw
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3303984 *Apr 12, 1965Feb 14, 1967Jurena Prokop JBeverage carton with straw
US3385501 *Jun 6, 1967May 28, 1968Henry M. ChangBeverage containers
US4292787 *Dec 4, 1979Oct 6, 1981Pneumatic Scale CorporationPaperboard carton
US4300716 *Jan 21, 1980Nov 17, 1981Pneumatic Scale CorporationPaperboard carton
US4301911 *Jul 18, 1979Nov 24, 1981Pneumatic Scale CorporationApparatus for handling a tubular carton blank
US4311476 *Jul 18, 1979Jan 19, 1982Williams Eric AMethod and apparatus for forming a container for liquids
US4331434 *Jul 27, 1979May 25, 1982Pneumatic Scale CorporationMethod and apparatus for forming a container for liquids
US4378080 *Jul 18, 1979Mar 29, 1983Nolex CorporationFluid velocity attenuating nozzle
US4569474 *Mar 30, 1981Feb 11, 1986Pneumatic Scale CorporationContinuous sealing rim for carton
US5547103 *Sep 6, 1994Aug 20, 1996The Popstraw Company, LlcBeverage container with self-contained drinking straw
US6076729 *Jun 22, 1998Jun 20, 2000The Popstraw Company, LlcFluid dispensing spout for beverage containers
US6206278Feb 11, 2000Mar 27, 2001The Popstraw Company, LlcFluid dispensing spout for beverage containers
US7036714 *Oct 5, 2001May 2, 2006Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton blank, carton and method of forming the carton
US7210612Jan 21, 2005May 1, 2007Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton blank, carton and method of forming the carton
US20020011515 *Oct 5, 2001Jan 31, 2002Walsh Joseph C.Carton blank, carton and method of forming the carton
US20050127150 *Jan 21, 2005Jun 16, 2005Walsh Joseph C.Carton blank, carton and method of forming the carton
US20060202003 *Jan 21, 2005Sep 14, 2006Walsh Joseph CCarton blank, carton and method of forming the carton
US20090285941 *May 12, 2009Nov 19, 2009Percival Po ReyesCombination package of liquid and solid foodstuff
EP0039116A1 *Apr 21, 1981Nov 4, 1981Ex-Cell-O CorporationLiquid container with straw opening means
EP1383691B1 *Apr 24, 2001Dec 3, 2008Mario Josť Alegria NevesPackaging for liquids
WO1981002147A1 *Jan 21, 1981Aug 6, 1981Pneumatic Scale CorpPaperboard carton
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/103.1, 215/389
International ClassificationB65D77/28, B65D5/72, B65D77/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/727, B65D77/283
European ClassificationB65D77/28C, B65D5/72F