Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3260082 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1966
Filing dateNov 22, 1963
Priority dateNov 22, 1963
Publication numberUS 3260082 A, US 3260082A, US-A-3260082, US3260082 A, US3260082A
InventorsDi Flavis Bennie A, Ralph Bodek
Original AssigneeBodek Entpr Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pick-proof lock
US 3260082 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 12, 1966 R. BoDl-:K ETAL 3,260,082

PICK-PROOF LOCK Filed Nov. 22, 196s Fig. 2

met

. f /A SSW Ralph Bode/r Bennie A. DIF lavis l N VEN T0125 Y WWW 3%1 United States Patent O 3,260,082 PICK-PROOF LOCK Ralph Botlek and Bennie A. Di Flavis, Philadelphia, Pa., assignors to Bodek Enterprises, Inc., Upper Darby, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Nov. 22, 1963, Ser. No. 325,548 s Claims. (01.70-421) The present invention generally relates to a lock which is of unique construction which renders the lock completely pick-proof and in addition informs the owner or others than 'an attempt has been made to pick the lock or the lock has been otherwise tampered with.

The lock of the present invention may be employed with various types of locks for any Iuse for which a lock is normally intended. For example, the pick-proof lock construction of the present invention may be employed in tumbler type locks having any number of pins. It may also be employed in wafer-type locks or any other type of lock requiring the use of a key for operating the locking mechanism.

Basically, the structure of .the present invention enables a lock to be constructed so that it cannot be opened by any known methods of utilizing skeleton keys or lock picking .tools in use at the present .time and also, the lock, if tampered with such as by using a skeleton key or any locking picking tool in an attempt to open it, the owner will know immediately that some effort has been made to open the lock.

Another object of the present invention is .to provide a pick-proof lock construction which will, in effect, destroy itself upon insertion of an improper key or upon insertion of a lock picking tool thereby locking the movable components of the lock Ito preclude movement in any direction even though .the proper key may be subsequently placed in the lock thereby serving to prevent the lock from being picked and at the same time indicating to the owner of the lock or to a person having a proper key .that the lock has been .tampered with.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a pick-proof lock that is relatively simple in construction, capable of being incorporated into existing lock structures with very little modification thereof, dependable -and long-lasting in operation, fool-proof insofar as preventing picking thereof is concerned and relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in .the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, 4reference being had to .the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a sectional view of the lock construction of the present invention illustrating the pick-proof construction incorporated therein with a proper key inserted;

FIGURE 2 is a transverse, sectional View taken substantially upon a plane passing along section line 2-2 of FIGURE 1 illustrating the orientation of the floating cylinder pin and corresponding frictionally retained tumbler pin illustrating the juncture coincident with the shear line between the barrel and cylinder;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view similar to FIGURE l but illustrating an improper key inserted into the lock and illustrating the position of the floating cylinder pin and .the frictionally retained tumbler pin which precludes rotation of the barrel;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse, sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing along section line 4 4 of FIGURE 3 illustrating further relationships between the pick-proof construction of the present invention when an improper key is inserted;

FIGURE 5 is an exploded group perspective view illustrating the construction of the frictionally retained tumbler pin and the structure for frictionally retaining it in place.

Referring now specifically to the drawings, the numeral 10 generally designates a lock incorporating lthe present invention therein. The lock 10 includes a cylinder or body 12 of conventional construction together with a rotatable barrel 14 received within a longitudinal bore 16 within the cylinder 12. This much of the structure is conventional in nature and .the present invention may be incorporated into any type of lock such as a pin-type lock, a wafer lock or any other mechanical .type lock. The structure has been illustrated in a pin-type lock for the purpose of describing the purposes and functions thereof.

The cylinder 12 is provided with a plurality of radial passages or bores '18 which may vary in number. Normally, each of the passages 18 includes a cylinder pin 20 that is spring biased inwardly by light coil springs 22.

The barrel 14 includes a plurality of passages 24 .therein which communicate with a longitudinal bore or passageway 26 for receiving the blade or shank 28 of .a key 30 which has an irregular surface 32 thereon for registry with sliding tumbler pins 34 so that the outer ends of the pins 34 will engage the ends of the pins 20 and due to the irregularity of the surface 32 and the variable length of the pins 34, all of the pins 34 Iand 20 will have their juncture coincident with the shear line 36 between the -body and the barrel so that the barrel may then be rotated in a conventional manne-r. Up to this point in the description, the structure has been conventional and itis the intent of the present invention to be incorporated into a rather conventional pin lock of the :type illustrated with very little modification thereof.

Essentially, the present invention involves the use of a floating cylinder pin 38 in one of the passages 18 and, as illustrated, it is preferable that the floating pin 38 be disposed adjacent the innermost spring-biased pin 20. However, the particular orientation of the lfloating pin 38 is not restricted insofar as it being used in lieu of any one of the spring-biased pins 20, or, if desired, two or more floating pins may be employed. In any event, the floating pin 38 is freely movable within the passageway 18 and no spring is employed.

In alignment with the floating pin 38, the barrel is provided with an accurately dimensioned tumbler pin 40 which is secured in place within the passage 24 by a piston 42 disposed substantially perpendicular thereto and slidably received within a sleeve 44. A calibrated coil spring 46 engaged the end of the piston 42 opposite from the pin 40 for urging the piston in frictional engagement with the pin 40. Preferably, the sleeve 44 is externally threaded as at 48 and is correspondingly threaded into an internally threaded bore 50 formed in the barrel 14. It is pointed out that the sleeve 44 may be secured in place by other means than threading and the spring may be secured in the sleeve in any suitable manner with the spring 46 being of suilicient strength to cause the piston 42 to frictionally engage the pin 40 to prevent the movement of the pin during normal vibrations and the like encountered by the lock. However, upon application of longitudinal force on the bottom rounded end of the pin 40, it will be forced upwardly thus c-ausing the upper end thereof to move upwardly beyond the shear line 36 into the passageway 18 which receives the floating pin 38 thus serving to prevent rotation of the barrel and also serving to prevent longitudinal extraction of the barrel in relation to the body.

The frictionally retained pin 40 is also provided with lan undercut portion or notch 52 that is normally disposed inwardly of the point of engagement between the piston 42 n.3 and the pin 40. However, when the pin 40 is moved outwardly, the piston 42 will be forced into the notch 52 thereby locking the pin 40 outwardly beyond the shear line to prevent the pin 40 from being retracted without completely destroying the lock. Thus, regardless of how the pin 40 is moved outwardly, either by an improper key or by a lock picking tool, it will be retained in its outward position Ythus serving to prevent operation of the lock even though the proper key is subsequently used thereby indicating to the owner or possesser of the proper key that the lock has been tampered with.

Any one of the tumbler pins can be used as a master pin but it is recommended that the next to last pin in the tumbler barrel be chosen as the master pin to exert pressure thereon. The correct key for this lock will be cut so that it clears the master pin by at least one fifteen thousandsof an inch. Therefore, when the correct key is inserted to open the lock, it will not activate the master tumbler pin 40 and cannot trigger the piston 42 in the cylinder or sleeve 44. As illustrated in the drawings, the master tumbler pin 40 is held in place precisely at the shear line of the lock by the pressure exerted on it by the piston 42. The floating cylinder pin also comes to rest precisely at the shear line of the lock by gravity and is held there by the support of the rnaster tumbler pin 40 beneath it. As the correct key is inserted, it clears the master tumbler pin 40 and as it turns, the master cylinder pin 40 does not interfere with operation of the lock. However, when any key but the correct key is inserted or when any picking device is inserted in the keyway and does not clear the master cylinder pin 40, the master cylinder pin 40 is raised. This action enables the piston 42 to enter the notch and the pin 40 then will be retained in elevated position. Thus the master tumbler pin is locked with part of the pin protruding above the shear line of the lock and in this position the barrel cannot be turned nor retracted and, Vof course, the lock cannot be opened. Even if a correct key is inserted after this, the lock still cannot be operated thus indicating to the person with the correct key that the lock has been tampered with.

The master cylinder pin 3S above the master tumbler or barrel pin 40 is constructed of a length that will not permit the master tumbler pin 40 to be raised completely above the shear line. Thus, with the master cylinder pin 38 preventing the master tumbler pin 40 from raising above the shear line, and the side piston 42 preventing the master tumbler pin 40 from dropping below the shear line, the master tumbler pin 40 remains with a portion of its length above the shear line, and a portion of its length below the shear line, effectively preventing the lock from being opened under any condition except by destroying the lock.

The pin 40 has a longitudinal groove 5ft therein of less radial dimension than notch 52 for receiving the rounded end 56 of the piston 42 as illustrated in FIGURE 5. This construction enables the pin 4f) to move outwardly beyond the shear line 36 and the piston 4Z will still drop into notch 52. The other end of the groove 54 will prevent the barrel pin 40 from dropping into the keyway since the inward movement of the pin 40 is limited by the inner end 56 of piston 42 engaging the upper closed end of the groove.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A pick-proof lock comprising a lock cylinder body having a longitudinal bore therein, a barrel rotatably journalled in said bore, said body having a plurality of radial passages communicating with the bore, a pin slidably disposed in each of said passages, and at least one of said pins floating within its Ipassage and the other of the pins being spring-biased towards the bore for projecting into the bore, said barrel having a peripheral surface defining a shear line with said bore, said barrel including a plurality of passages therein alignable with the passages in the body for receiving the inner ends of the pins mounted in the passages in the body when the lock barrel is in locked condition, each of the bores in the barrel having a slidable pin therein, said barrel having a longitudinal passage therein communicating with the passages having the pins therein for receiving a key having a particular irregular surface thereon for engaging the inner ends of the pins in the barrels for urging them outwardly so that the outer ends of the pins align with the shear line for enabling rotation of the barrel when the proper key is inserted, means releasably securing the pin in the barrel alignable with the fioating pin in the body immovable for retaining the floating pin in the body aligned with the shear line whereby the fioating pin will normally not serve to prevent rotation of the barrel, said pin in the barrel alignable with saidfloating pin being movable upwardly and away from. the key receiving passage in the barrel when an improper key or lock pickv ing tool is inserted in the key receiving passage whereby the means retaining the pin alignable with the floating pin will retain the pin above the shear line thereby preventing rotation of the lock barrel and at the same time indicating to a subsequent user of a proper key that the lock has been tampered with inasmuch as the means for retaining the pin alignable with the floating pin will retain the pin within the passage in the body receiving the fioating pin.

2. The structure as defined in claim. 1 wherein said means for retaining the pin alignable with the iioating pin in place includes a piston member disposed generally in perpendicular relation to the longitudinal axis of the pin, and spring means urging said piston member into engagement with the side surface of the pin alignable with the floating pin for retaining the pin frictionally in place.

3. The structure as defined in claim 2 wherein said pin alignable with the floating pin includes a recess therein normally misaligned with the piston but being aligned with the piston when the pin alignablerwith the iioating pin is moved by an improper key or by a lock picking tool whereby the piston will engage the recess for securely retaining the pin outwardly of the shear line for locking the barrel to the body thereby preventing rotation of the barrel and also preventing extraction of the barrel from the body without destruction of the lock.

4. The structure as defined in claim 3 wherein said floating pin and said pin alignable with the floating pin are disposed adjacent the innermost set of pins in the body and barrel.

5. The structure as defined in claim 4 wherein said barrel is provided with a laterally extending bore communicating with the passage receiving the pin alignable with the floating pin, a sleeve screw-threaded into said bore and slidably receiving said piston, said spring means including a spring disposed within the sleeve for urging the piston outwardly thereof into frictional engagement with the pin alignable with the fioating pin.

6. In a lock including a stationary part and a movable part, first lock means interrelated to the parts for lockingl the parts in relation to each other until the first lock means is correctly manipulated for rendering the first lock means ineffective, and wholly independent second lock means interrelated to the parts and normally ineffective to render the parts locked in relation to each other and rendered effective to lock the parts together when the first lock means is incorrectly manipulated and being continuously effective to lock the parts together even when the first lock means is subsequently correctly manipulated.

7. The lock as dened in claim 6 together with means for retaining the second lock means in its ineffective and effective conditions whereby the parts will be retained in locked relation to each other when the second lock means is rendered effective.

8. The lock as dened in claim 7 wherein said second lock means includes a pair of pins normally having a juncture line coincident with the shear line between the movable and stationary parts, said juncture lines between the pins being misaligned with the shear line upon incorrect manipulation of the rst lock means, said means retaining the second lock means in effective condition including a spring biased piston movably mounted in said movable part and engaged with one of said pins for retaining it in position bridging the shear line thereby preventing movement of the movable part in any direction.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 758,024 4/ 1904 Taylor 70-421 5 1,707,922 4/1929 Pepper 70-421 2,137,504 11/1938 OkC-onnell 70-364 2,836,973 6/1958 Schillizzi 70-421 3,099,151 7/1963 Schlage 70-383 3,195,330 7/1965 Bauer 70-421 10 PATRICK A. CLIFFORD, Primary Examiner.

ALBERT H. KAMPE, Examiner.

P, TEITELBAUM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US758024 *Jul 22, 1903Apr 19, 1904Yale & Towne Mfg CoPin-tumbler lock.
US1707922 *Jan 12, 1928Apr 2, 1929Leonard PepperLock
US2137504 *Jun 12, 1937Nov 22, 1938John J O'connellPickproof lock
US2836973 *Oct 25, 1954Jun 3, 1958Salvatore S SchillizziAnti-pick cylinder lock
US3099151 *Jan 16, 1961Jul 30, 1963Schlage Lock CoPin tumbler cylinder key system
US3195330 *May 20, 1963Jul 20, 1965Sargent & CoPick-resistant lock
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3541822 *Jun 28, 1968Nov 24, 1970Fred A MurphyPickproof locks
US4580425 *Nov 7, 1983Apr 8, 1986Smith Jerry RHigh security lock
US5060494 *Jul 13, 1990Oct 29, 1991Moorhouse John HCylindrical lock structure
US6499660Jan 24, 2002Dec 31, 2002John H. MoorhouseOptical security system
US6764007Oct 9, 2002Jul 20, 2004John H. MoorhouseOptical security system
US7073708Mar 1, 2005Jul 11, 2006John H. MoorhouseOptical security system
US7108182Feb 6, 2004Sep 19, 2006John H. MoorhouseOptical security system
US20030136838 *Oct 9, 2002Jul 24, 2003John H. MoorhouseOptical security system
US20040256461 *Feb 6, 2004Dec 23, 2004Moorhouse John H.Optical security system
US20060237522 *May 19, 2006Oct 26, 2006John MoorhouseOptical security system
US20100212383 *Oct 23, 2007Aug 26, 2010Craig Robert StuartBump-Resistant Pin Tumbler Lock
DE2949643A1 *Dec 10, 1979Jun 19, 1980Chicago Lock CoZylinderschloss
DE3829790A1 *Sep 2, 1988Mar 15, 1990Harald KaiserCylinder lock
WO2008075334A2 *Dec 4, 2007Jun 26, 2008Mul-T-Lock Technologies Ltd.Deburring tumbler pin
WO2008075334A3 *Dec 4, 2007Jul 31, 2008Mul T Lock Technologies LtdDeburring tumbler pin
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/421
International ClassificationE05B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05B27/0067
European ClassificationE05B27/00P3