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Publication numberUS3260091 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1966
Filing dateMay 24, 1963
Priority dateMay 24, 1963
Publication numberUS 3260091 A, US 3260091A, US-A-3260091, US3260091 A, US3260091A
InventorsShaw Jr Ralph M
Original AssigneePedrick Tool And Machine Compa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bending machine
US 3260091 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 12, 1966 R. M. SHAW, JR 3,260,091

BENDING MACHINE Filed May 24, 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

July 12, 1966 R. M. SHAW, JR 3,260,091

BENDING MACHINE Filed May 24, 1965 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

R. M. SHAW, JR

BENDING MACHINE July 12, 1966 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 24, 1963 Q R Q Q INVENTOR. fiayfi/H 5176b, BY

J2 wigz y 1966 R. M. SHAW, JR 3, 60,091

BENDING MACHINE Filed May 24, 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG: 4

IN VEN TOR.

July 12, 1966 R. M. SHAW, JR

BENDING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 24, 1965 INVENTOR. Ali/p]; MSM JI: BY

United States, Patent 3,260,091 BENDING MACHINE Ralph M. Shaw, Jr., Edgewater Parlc, N.J., assignor to Pedrick Tool and Machine Company, Inc., Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed May 24, 1963, Ser. No. 283,021 13 Claims. (Cl. 72152) This invention relates to bending machines and, in particular, it is concerned with machines and improvements thereto for angularly bending rods, bars, tubes and the like of metal or other flexible materials.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide a simple, inexpensive and reliable bending machine for making profile bends of variable radii or multiple radii in stock with the bending occurring in either a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction in a single operation or pass of the machine. Although an existing machine known as a Stretch Bender can do this type of bending, all of the bends produced by that machine can only be made in the same direction and the machine itself, as distinguished from the machine of this invention, is extremely expensive.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a bending machine having the capacity to implant bends in structural members which have been traditionally shaped by drop forging through use of a punch press while the members are hot, thus providing substantial savings in time and costs.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a bending machine having, in addition to the above outlined advantages, the feature wherein relatively large floor space heretofore necessary to accommodate move ment of the bending stock and bending apparatus is no longer required. It is also my object to provide a superior bending apparatus which can be assembled and used with the standard bending machines now in existence, such as the mechanism described in US. Patent No. 2,884,987, issued to R. M. Shaw, Jr., on May 5, 1959.

Other objects and attendant advantages of this invention will more readily appear from the following detailed description and the attached drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in top plan of the bending machine conveniently embodying one form of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a view in side elevation of the mechanism shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view in partial side elevation and in vertical section taken as indicated by the lines and arrows III-III in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a view in top plan illustrating the movement of certain parts of the apparatus from the positions shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary detail plan view of one modification of the bending apparatus of this invention;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary detail plan view similar to FIG. 5 wherein a succeeding operative step is shown;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary detail plan view showing the third step of the bending operation wherein a chain link is formed;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary detail plan view showing the fourth step of the bending operation otherwise disclosed in the preceding three figures;

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view taken along the lines and arrows IX-IX of FIG. 5;

FIG. 10 is a vertical sectional view taken along the lines and arrows XX of FIG. 5;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged perspective view of the bent stock having a U-shape; and,

FIG. 12 is an enlarged perspective view of the finished bent stock forming a closed chain link.

Although this description makes use of the technical words of the art, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the apparatus described thereby and that equivalent structure and substitutions may be made where such are practical and advantageous.

It should be understood that the mechanism of this invention and the method of operation thereof constitutes an appreciable improvement to the basic bending machines well known in the art whereby said inexpensive machines gain capacity to create shapes heretofore unattainable. For example, the machine disclosed in my United States Patent No. 2,884,987, dated May 5, 1959, is representative of a suitable bending machine to which the improvements of this invention can be effectively applied and incorporated. The description of the bending machine set forth in that patent is included herein by reference and certain mechanical apparatus fully disclosed in that patent are only generally described in this application.

Referring, preliminarily, to FIG. 2, of the drawings, a typical bending machine is shown comprising a table like work base 10 supported at a working height from the fioor brace 14 by a plurality of legs 12, The legs and table define an interior area 13 wherein the drive apparatus, generally designated by the numeral 15, of the machine is located. The drive apparatus 15 comprises a reversible electric motor 16 connected to a drive shaft 30 by a pair of meshing beveled gears 19 and 20. Shaft 30 has a spur gear 34 fixedly mounted thereon, gear 34 being engaged with a second spur gear 36 fixedly mounted on a spindle sleeve 40a. The meshing spur gears 34 and 36 are of such relative size that spindle sleeve 40a is driven at approximately one half the speed of shaft 30. It should be understood that the drive mechanism disclosed herein is but one form of various types of drive apparatus which can be used to rotate shaft 30 and spindle sleeve 40a at pre-determined rates of speed, in both directions, according to the manipulation of control switches (not shown) by an operator. A speed reducer can be included in the drive mechanism if necessary.

Positioned immediately on top of base 10 and rotating freely thereabove, is a flat, circular shaped supporting member or plate 60. Plate has the same axis as does spindle sleeve 4011 even though the members rotate separately. Fixedly mounted on member 60 is a single, wiper arm assembly, generally designated by the numeral 64. Spindle 40, a continuation of spindle sleeve 40a, extends above plate 60 and rotates separately from base member of the stationary wiper arm assembly 72 shown in FIG. 1. A piece of rod stock S is shown in position against an interchangeable die 74 which is held in position by a threaded nut 75.

Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawings, it is seen that circular table 10 is larger in diameter than moveable plate 60, and that the rnoveable wiper arm assembly 64 is fixedly attached to the plate 60 by bolts 65, only one being shown in FIG. 1. In distinction, stationary wiper arm assembly 72 is fixably attached to table 10 by two bolts 72a.

The moveable wiper arm assembly 64 comprises a wiper arm 62 having a center slot '63 in which a slide 61 (shown in FIG. 3) moves. A tapered-end swaging block 66 is mounted on slide 61 by a pair of threaded bolts 68. A threaded stem 67, attached to slide 61 and threaded through block 67a in arm 62 allows the swaging block 66 to be adjusted closer or at a greater distance from the tube or bar stock S.

The stationary wiper arm assembly 72 is similar in construction to assembly 64 and consists of an arm 75 having a base 70 extending around spindle 40, a central groove 76, a swaging block 78 mounted on a slide (not shown) by a pair of bolts 80, the slide controlled by a stem 73 operating through a block 7311. 1

An interchangeable, work piece clamp assembly 84 is attached to the spindle 40 by a member 86 which extends around spindle 40 and holds the assembly 84 tightly thereagainst. Base member 85 of the clamp 84 has an upstanding stud 87 with a threaded bore 88 extending through the center. A bearing block 90 presses against the stock S and is held by a threaded shaft 92 extending through bore 88 and a knurled thumb adjusting surface 94. The bearing block 90 can be adjusted by threading the shaft 92 so as to move the block at a greater or'less distance from the die 74 held opposite at the top of the spindle 40.

Referring now to FIG. 3 of the drawings, it is seen that most of the structure shown and described in connection with FIGS. 1 and 2 is shown in this figure in vertical sectional view. Spindle sleeve 40a extends upward through a hole 11 in the table 10 where it joins spindle 40. Gear 36, keyed at point 35, delivers torque from the spur gear 34 and shaft 30 to spindle 40 which, in turn, is keyed at point 4-2 to a center plug 44. Positioned on top of plug 44 is an interchangeable die 74 which is selected according to the shape of the stock and the desired angle or bend to be implanted. A pair of locking pins 45 maintain die 74 rigid with plug 44 and bolt 75 is threaded into plug 44 to complete the engagement. Clamp base 86, mounted around plug 44, is held tightly against that element by a plurality of threaded plugs 86a one of which is shown in FIG. 3. Within a recessed area 102 in table 10, a spur gear 81 is mounted on shaft 30, this gear engages a second spur gear 82 which rotates freely around the base of spindle 40. A plurality of threaded bolts 83, two of which are shown in FIG. 3, fixedly connect gear 82 to the moveable plate 60. It should be understood that the torque supplied by motor 16 through shafts 24 and 30 is delivered to spindle 40 by gears 34 and 36, and, at the same time, torque is also delivered to moveable support plate 60 by means of gears 81 and 82.

The operation of this form of my invention is sub stantially as follows. The selected bar or tube stock S is placed against a selected die 74 and the bearing block 90 of the clamp assembly 84 is threaded tight pressing the stock S firmly against the die. Wiper arm assemblies 64 and 72 are placed in the initial position, that is, adjacent one another, as in FIG. 1 and the swaging blocks 66 and 78 are positioned in contact with the stock When motor 16 is started and torque delivered through the gears, the wiper arm assembly 64, attached to moveable plate 60, begins to rotate in a clockwise direction as seen in FIG. 1, while wiper assembly 72 remains stationary. Accordingly, spindle 40, die 74 and clamp assembly 84 begin to rotate in the same direction as torque is delivered to gear 36. Referring now to FIG. 4, it will be observed that moveable wiper assembly 64 has rotated approximately 180 degrees while the spindle has rotated approximately 90 degrees, and, as a consequence, the stock S and, particularly, its ends S-1, 5-2 have been bent around die 74 into a U-shape. Stock S is held tightly against the die member at all times by the clamping assembly 84 so that no movement of the stock separate from the die is permitted. During normal operations, power is continually applied until wiper arm 64 rotates beyond the 180 degree position so that the ends S1, 5-2

almost touch. At this point, the motor is reversed by a limit switch (not shown) and the wiper apparatus 64 and plate 60 rotate back to the position shown in FIG. 1. The clamp 84 and the swaging blocks 66, 78 are then loosened so that the stock S can be removed, It has been found that when the stock 5 is composed of a flexible material it is often advisable to bend the stock beyond the U-shape position so that when it is removed from the bending machine, the bent stock will spring only to a U-sha-pe. It should be understood that this apparatus can be supplemented with a series of switches and electrical circuits as disclosed in Patent No. 2,884,- 987, referred to above, whereby the machine operation is partially automatic. Automatic switches can be placed on table 10 so that forward direction of the wiper apparatus 64 is stopped before the ends S1, S2 of the stock come into contact.

A modification of the bending machine of this invention is illustrated in FIGS. 5 through 8. Referring first to FIG. 5, a stationary wiper arm 91 is fixedly mounted to the table 10 and moveable armb 93 is mounted to moveable support plate 60. In describing these figures, parts having the same construction and operation as in the preceding figures will be identified by the same numbers. Mounted for movement around upstanding studs 95 and 99 of arms 91 and 93 are swaging blocks 96 and 98, respectively, each having an indentation 96a and 98a at the inner end. The spindle 40 and plug 44, driven in a manner similar to that disclosed in FIG. 3, is equipped with an elliptical cross-piece member 102 which is attached to plug 44 by a bolt. 112, member 102 forming the base for the clamp assembly 84. A pair of round dies 104 have cylindrical bases 104a extending through a pair of bearing members 106, 108. These members, at the end, have raised elongated portions 106a and 108a which bear against the stock S as described below.

Referring now to FIG. 9, spindle 40 is shown having a plug 44 with a key 42 connecting the two, and a bolt 112 holding the clamping base 102 to the plug 44. It should be understood that when spindle 40 rotates the dies 104 together with hearing members 106, 108, rotate holding the stock S in the position shown.

As shown in FIG. 10, swaging stud 95 extends upward from wiper arm 91 through the swaging block 96 and allows said member to rotate therearound.

The operation of this modification of this invention, designed primarily to form chain links out of tubular stock, is described below. In FIG. 5, the stock S is positioned between the two dies 104 and the clamp apparatus 84. The stock S is also held between the hearing members 106, 108 and the two dies 104, and the members 106, 108 fitting within recesses 96a and 98a of the swaging blocks. After the clamp 84 is threaded tightly against the stock S, the motor is started thereby moving plate 60 and wiper arm 93 in a clockwise direction until, as shown in FIG. 6, the swaging blocks 96 and 98 have bent the stock S into substantially a U-shape. As shown in FIG. 7, the motor is then reversed and the moveable wiper arm 93 is returned almost to the initial position. Then swaging blocks 96 and 98 are rotated around plugs 95 and 99, as shown by the dot and dash lines so that the raised portions 106a and 108a of hearing members 106, 108 can be positioned outside of the swaging blocks 96 and 98 as shown in FIG. 7, after which blocks 96 and 98 are returned to the full line portions shown. With the bearing members 106a and 108a now pressed against the ends S-1 and S-2, and the swaging blocks 96 and 98 pressed against the bearing members, the motor is activated in the forward direction causing the bearing members 106, 108 to close the ends of the stock so as to form a complete link as shown in FIG. 8. In FIGS. 11 and 12, the tubular stock S is shown having a U-shape and then as a closed link.

It should be understood that although the apparatus of this invention has been described as bending simple bar stock into U-bolts and closed links, the same apparatus with suitable stationary and moveable dies can be used to bend in one operation unusual shapes, such as the roof truss of a railroad car. The roof truss of a bus customarily has a long sweep in the middle and a straight bend on each end. These structural members are normally made on a punch press and are bent while hot by what is known as drop forging. The same bending can be achieved by the machine of this invention saving the very considerable costs of a heating furnace, a drop forge, the punch press and the dies together with the necessary labor. In addition, my bending machine is adaptable to forming in one operation the side frames of a glider having multiple bends of close radii while comparative machines require two or more passes to implant similar bends in such stock.

Although this invention has been described with reference to specific forms and embodiments thereof, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes other than those referred to above may be made in the form of the apparatus, that equivalent elements may be substituted for those illustrated in the drawings, that parts may be reversed, and that certain features of the invention may be used to advantage independently of the use of other features, or within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having described my invention; I claim:

1. In a bending machine, the combination comprising a spindle mounted for rotation, a die mounted on the spindle for movement therewith, an adjustable clamp fixedly attached to the spindle and positioned to hold the work against the die as the spindle rotates, a moveable support plate mounted coaxially with the spindle but arranged to rotate freely therefrom, a moveable bending arm fixedly mounted on said support means proximate to the spindle so that upon rotation of the support means the bearing surface of the bending arm describes an arc around the spindle, a stationary bending arm fixedly mounted adjacent the spindle and positioned so that when the spindle rotates the bearing surface ofthe stationary bending arm describes an are around the spindle identical to that of the moveable bearing arm, a power source and a gear train connecting the source to both the spindle and the support means, said gear train being arranged so that the spindle and support means rotate in the same direction with the support means rotating at twice the velocity of the spindle.

2. The bending machine as defined in claim 1 wherein the clamp comprises a clamp base mounted on the spindle, a threaded bearing arm having a bearing block at the end proximate to the die and a threaded bore stud mounted on the clamp base through which the bearing arm is adjusted so as to press the bearing block against the stock.

3. The bending machine as defined in claim 2 wherein the support plate rotates around the spindle, the plate being attached to a :spur gear therebeneath which rotates around the spindle, said spur gear being dniven by a second gear mounted on a driving shaft.

4. In a bending machine, the combination comprising a flat support table, a spindle positioned on the table and mounted for rotation, a die fixedly mounted on the spindle for rotation therewith, an adjustable clamp fixedly attached to the spindle and positioned to hold the work to be bent against the die as the spindle rotates, a moveable support plate mounted coaxially with the spindle and in the same plane as the table soas to rotate freely thereon, a moveable wiper assembly fixedly mounted on said support plate proximate to the spindle so that upon rotation of the support plate the bearing surface of the wiper assembly describes an are around the spindle, a stationary wiper assembly fixedly mounted on the table adjacent the spindle and positioned relative to the spindle so that when the spindle rotates the leading edge of the stationary rwiper arm describes an arc identical with that of the moveable wiper arm, both of said wiper arms being positioned adjacent one another at the initial step of the bending operation, a power source and a gear train connecting the source to the spindle and the support means, said gear train arranged to rotate the spindle and support plate in the same direction while the support plate rotates at twice the velocity of the spindle.

5. The bending machine .as defined in claim 4 wherein a pair of bearing members are mounted on the spindle and rotate therewith, said members being shaped to hold the work and being positioned so that the wiper arms press against the members and cause the work to be bent completely around the spindle.

6. In a machine of the character described, for bending rods, bars, tubes and the like, the combination comprising revolva-ble die means, a stationary main bending member, a movable main bending member, said bending members being disposed for engaging one side of the work respectively at longitudinally spaced points along the length thereof, said die means being disposed for engaging the opposite side of the work at a point intermediate the points engaged by said bending members, means mounting said movable bending member for descnibing an are about said die means, a power source, gear means operatively interposed between said power source and both said die means and movable bending member and operable for actuating said die means and simultaneously moving said movable bending member at a substantially greater angular rate than that at which said die means is turned.

7. The bending machine according to claim 6 wherein a clamp operable for securing the work to the die means is mounted for rotary movement with the die means.

8. The bending machine according to claim 6 wherein the angular rate of movement of the movable bending member is twice as great as that of the die means.

9. The bending machine according to claim 6 wherein auxiliary bending members are operable for bending the opposite end portions of the work respectively about said die means, and said main bending members are operable independently of said auxiliary bending members for bending the opposite end portions of the 'work approximately ninety degrees respectively about said die means, and for then actuating said auxiliary bending members whereby to bend the opposite end portions of the work approximately another ninety degrees respectively about said die members.

10. The bending machine according to claim 9 where in the die means is provided with oppositely facing rounded surface areas about which, respectively, the opposite end portions of the work are bent, and the auxil'ia-ry bending members are mounted for pivotal movement respectively about the centers of curvature of said surface areas.

11. The bending machine according to claim 9 wherein the die means includes a pair of members round in transverse section disposed on opposite sides of, and equidistantly from, the central axis of the machine and mounted for orbital movement about said axis, and the auxiliary bending members are mounted for pivotal movement respectively about said pair of members.

'12. The bending machine according to claim 9 wherein the main bend-ing members respectively include pivotally mounted work engaging parts, and the auxiliary bending members and said work engaging parts are selectively operatively positionable with said auxiliary bending members between said work engaging parts or with said work engaging parts between said auxiliary bending members.

13. In a machine of the character described, for bending rods, bars, tubes and the like, the combination comprising a rotatable support, a spindle extending through said support and rotatable independently thereof, a die, clamping means for holding the work against the die during the bending operation, said die and clamping means being mounted on said spindle for'rotating therewith, a stationary bending member mounted adjacent the die, a movable bending member mounted upon said rotatable support adjacent the stationary bending member for describing an are around the die, each of said bending members including an arm having a central lengthwise groove, a slide adjustably positioned within the groove, and a swaging block mounted upon said slide, a power source, and connecting means arranged between the power source and both the die and the movable bending member independently whereby in the bending operation both the die and the movable bending member rotate in the same direction, the bending member rotating faster than the die.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 670,0'19 3/1901 Gillies 72--400 2,501,241 3/1950 Shaw 72155 2,884,987 5/1959 Shaw 72-383 0 CHARLES W. LANHAM, Primary Examiner.

R. D. GREFE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US670019 *Apr 4, 1900Mar 19, 1901Henry Lawrence GullineMetal-forming machine.
US2501241 *Oct 10, 1946Mar 21, 1950Pedrick Tool & Machine CompanyBending machine
US2884987 *Mar 30, 1956May 5, 1959Pedrick Tool And Machine CompaBending machines with reversible motor drive
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3680347 *Jan 13, 1971Aug 1, 1972Schenck CorpBending machine
US3956916 *Feb 24, 1975May 18, 1976Herkner Edward CMethod and apparatus for making fishing lures
US4173884 *Feb 15, 1978Nov 13, 1979Dobinson Reginald PForming machine for bending metal bars
US4532787 *Mar 9, 1982Aug 6, 1985C.M.L. Costruzioni Meccaniche Liri S.R.L.Portable electromechanically-controlled pipe-bending apparatus
US4607517 *Mar 16, 1984Aug 26, 1986Heinz Finzer KgStamping and bending tool assembly
US5598736 *May 19, 1995Feb 4, 1997N.A. Taylor Co. Inc.Traction bending
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/152, 72/156, 72/388, 72/400, 72/310, 72/449, 72/157, 72/217
International ClassificationB21D7/00, B21D7/06, B21D11/00, B21D11/10
Cooperative ClassificationB21D7/066, B21D11/10
European ClassificationB21D7/06C, B21D11/10