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Publication numberUS3260193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1966
Filing dateAug 31, 1964
Priority dateAug 31, 1964
Publication numberUS 3260193 A, US 3260193A, US-A-3260193, US3260193 A, US3260193A
InventorsMax Mann
Original AssigneeMax Mann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marking device
US 3260193 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 12, 1966 M. MANN 3,260,193

MARKING DEVICE Filed Aug. 31, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VENTOR MA X MA NN www A ORNEY M. MANN MARKING DEVICE July 12, 1966 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 51, 1964 IN VENTOR MAX MANN BY M 65 (4/ %NEY July 12, 1966 M. MANN 3,260,193

MARKING DEVICE Filed Aug. 31, 1964 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR MAX MANN A ORNEY United States Patent 3,260,193 MARKING DEVICE Max Mann, 232 Palisade Ave. Garfield, NJ. Filed Aug. 31, 1964, Ser. No. 393,223 7 Claims. (Cl. 101-35) This invention relates to marking devices and particularly to a marking device adapted for mounting beside a conveyor, the marker being actuated by intermittent contact with articles moving by on the conveyor.

A primary object is to provide a machine having indicia mounted upon a marking roller aligned for printing upon a package passing by on a conveyor, the marking roller being combined with means for realigning it for marking another package after each print.

A further object is to provide a combined realigning and ink-transfer roller intermittently operative to realign a printing roller for the next printing application while transferring ink to marking indicia thereon with each print.

A further object is to provide a marking roller operative at any rate by frictional rolling contact upon packages to be marked variable with the number and spacing between packages or the rate of movement of a conveyor carrying such packages and presenting their surfaces to the marking roller for marking thereof. These and other objects of the invention will be inherent in the description and drawings illustrating the invention in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the device illustrating the passage of packages in contact with the marking wheel or the device for print thereon;

FIG. 2 is an end view in the direction of the movement of packages toward the machine;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view; and

FIG. 4 is a detail illustrating the arcuately cut-away portion of the printing wheel in plan.

The printing, marking and auxiliary alignment and ink supply elements are supported upon a bed plate (FIGS. land 3) which terminates at its inner element mounting end in a vertical supporting plate 12 to which it is integrally attached. The outer ends 14 and 16 are forked into a yoke which fits slidingly about a vertical supporting sleeve or boss 18 in adjusted horizontal position fixed by vertical set screws 19 therein, the boss 18 in turn being adjustable vertically to selected position on a vertical standard 20 fixed by set screws 22. The standard 20 may be mounted by bolts 24 to any supporting bracket (not shown) for support beside a conveyor belt 26. However, with the vertical 'and horizontal adjustments upon the support standard 20 and yoke arms 14 and 16, the device may be positioned by any conveyor belt 26 carrying packages 28, printing such packages as rapidly as they pass the marking roller.

The bed plate 10 has mounted thereon a fractional horsepower gear head motor 30 which drives a shaft 32 at a preselected constant speed. A cylindrically shaped inking and realignment roller 34 is mounted through an anti-friction bearing (not shown) on the outer end of shaft 32, secured thereon by a collar 35 fixed to shaft 32 by a set screw 37, further secured by a flange nut on the end of shaft 32 to prevent axial movement, the roller 34 being free for rotation through its bearing independently of the shaft 32. A compression spring 36 fits loosely around the shaft 32 and presses against the roller 34 at its inner face. A collar 38, adjustable axially on shaft 32, is fixed by set screw 40 to the shaft 32 for rotation therewith and spaced to bear in compression against the spring 36 frictionally, thus to provide a frictional clutch drive to the roller 34 adjustable with the axial compression of the spring 36 supplied by the spacing of the collar 38 on shaft 32. ends of cylindrical roller 34 are roughened or knurled as ice a pair of rims for the benefit of supplying tangential frictional rolling contact in realignment of a printing roller, as will appear. The center portion 44 of the roller 34 is smooth, cylindrical surface, usually of metal, adapted to accept a film of ink continuously supplied thereto by an inking felt and transfer the same to printing indicia on a printing wheel, both in rolling contact therewith.

The plate 12 has an upwardly extending shoulder 46 slotted at 48 inward from one side, as shown in FIG. 1, to receive and adjustably support therein, the shaft 50 of an inking roller 62. Shaft 50 is positioned by an adjusting bolt 52 and a knurled nut 54 bolt threaded on opposite sides of the plate 46 to shaft 50 for secure positioning support of the inking roller felt thereon. The opposite end of the shaft carries a bushing 56 freely rotatable about the shaft 50 and secured thereon to allow free rotation by a collar 58 held by a set screw 60. The bushing 56 rotatably carries an inking roller 62 upon the center of which is a replacable felt 64 maintained filled with ink and positioned for tangential rolling contact for ink transfer to the center portion 44 of the realignment and inking roller 34. Thus, as described, the realignment and ink transfer roller 34 is in continuous rolling contact with the felt 64 of the inking wheel 62 for supply of ink thereto driven through a frictional clutch through spring 36 upon shaft 32 of the motor 30.

A print or marking roller 66 is mounted through an anti-friction bearing, not shown, on a shaft 68. The shaft 68 is adjustably fitted upon supporting plate 12 mounted in a vertical slot 70, and fastened in adjusted vertical position therein by nuts 72 fastened on opposite sides of the plate 12. The outer end of the shaft 68 has a small spring 74 secured under slight compression by a collar 76 bearing in adjusted position fixed by a set screw 78 against spring 74 whereby very light spring pressure is exerted against the print wheel 66 to reduce a tendency to rapid spin, but insuflicient to inhibit free rotation on its bearing. The print wheel has a pair of flexible rims 80, usually of rubber, which co-act both with the knurled rims 42 of the realignment wheel, rolling tangentially thereagainst in most positions, and with a surface 28 of the package to be marked as it moves 'by the printing wheel 66 on a conveyor 26, engaging the rims 88 at an opposite tangential portion. The center portion 80 of the printing wheel 66 has several flexible ribs 82 which support indicia frictionally inserted letters or numbers 85 as fric 'tionally held between the ribs 82. Such indicia 85 impart the print in rolling contact with the package surface.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, an arcuate portion 84 of the printing wheel 66 is cut away forming a discontinuous portion which provides a gap between the rims 42 and ink-transfer surface 44 of the alignment wheel 34 and the printing wheel 66. In that position as shown in FIG. 1 there is no driving contact between the realignment wheel and the printing wheel.

A stop 86 protrudes axially from the outer surface of the printing wheel 66, the stop 86 being spaced radially inward from the circumference of the printing roller. A stop triggering mechanism comprising a shaft 90 is journaled in the plate 12 through a rotatable sleeve 92 thereon. A stop arm 88 is carried by a collar 96 radially fixed to the sleeve 92 by a set screw 94 which positions the arm 88 in line with the stop 86. The stop arm 88 is threaded for longitudinal adjusting of the radial distance between the stop 86 and stop arm for accurate positioning. A stop trigger arm 98 is carried by a second collar 100 on the opposite inner side of the sleeve. A stop abutment 102 for the trigger arm 98 is carried by the plate 12, allowing pivotal movement of the arm 98, the stop arm 88 and sleeve 92 all interconnected for rotation on the shaft 90 in the direction of the arrows by pivotal movement to The outer tangential ends 42 of the upper and lower disengage stop 86 and thus free the print wheel 66 for rotation. A tension spring 104 has one end fastened to a pin 106 in the plate extension 46 and the other end to the outer tangential surface of the collar 96 at the point 108, biasing the trigger 98 against the stop 102, in which position the stop arm 88 is also pivotally aligned to engage the stop 86 of the print wheel 66. In that position the print wheel 66 is stopped from rotation by the arm 88 cooperating with stop 86. In that stop position the arcuate cut-away portion 84 of the print wheel is aligned with the alignment wheel 34 so that there is no driving contact therebetween.

In operation, the motor continuously rotates the realignment and inking wheel 34, through its easily slipping clutch engagement. However, the print wheel is held stationary by stop 86 engaging arm 88. The packages 28 to be marked are disposed at any irregular intervals upon a conveyor 26 aligned only with respect to the printing device to pass in contact with rims 80 and the printing surface 85 of the printing wheel 66 and receive print in rolling contact with indicia 85 therein. Each time the package strikes the stop lever 98 it carries it pivotally a-rcuately forward and upward, rota-ting the sleeve 92 and stop arm 88 arcuately up and away from stop 86 to the dotted line position of FIG. 1 and the forward end of the package 28 frictionally engages the printing wheel 66 for printing rotation therewith. After the package passes, the print roller 66 terminates driving contact therewith, the lever 98 and stop 88 are biased by spring 104 to return to normal position against stops 102 and 86, the full line position of FIG. 1. However, after the printing wheel 66 has begun to rotate in contact with the surface of the package 28, the frictional rims 80 have moved into frictional contact with the rims 42 of the ink transfer and realignment wheel 34 and the print roller 34 consequently continues to be rotated by the frictional drive provided by .the shaft -32 and spring 36. That rotation of printing roller will be continued until the stop 86 engages the stop arm 88 and arcuate cut-away portion 84 is positioned below the realigning and inking wheel 34; that is, out of direct contact therewith as shown .in FIG. 1. In this manner the printing roller is continuously repositioned by the realignment wheel 34 for printing the next package after each printing. The print is thus applied on the same position of each package however irregularly the packages may be spaced upon the conveyor belt. Each package actuates the completely realigned printing wheel by engagment of the trigger arm 98 releasing stop 86 and then rotating print roller in frictional rolling contact with its surface.

It is thus possible to print very rapidly and very accurately with packages moving at quite high speeds along the conveyor belt such as 200 or 500 prints being available per minute. The single rotation of the printing wheel 66, moreover, always brings the indicia or printing elements 85 in inking contact with the ink transfer surface 44 of the wheel 34, whereby a fresh film of ink is supplied thereto with each rotation. No parts of the device, therefore, are under mechanical strain. The power for rotating the print wheel is in the package Whose surface engages it frictionally as it passes by. The rotation of the print wheel for realignment is merely lightly frictional tangential contact between the rims 42 and 80, but since the drive of the alignment wheel allows easy frictional slipping through spring 36 hearing against collar 38, anyone near the machine can stop it from rotating by gripping the alignment wheel with the fingers.

The device is readily adjustably mounted beside a conveyor and may print against horizontal surfaces or vertical surfaces depending upon the direction in which the printing device is mounted i.e. the direction of movement of the packages presenting a side or top surface to the marker. Moreover, since it is a rolling contact print the shape of the package is not critical. Even though the aligning motor drives at a constant moderate speed and the drive connection with the aligning wheel is easily interrupted, nevertheless the print wheel in contact therewith will be realigned for each print, however fast the packages move by on the conveyor.

Certain modifications will occur to those skilled in the art and, accordingly, it is intended that the description given herein be regarded as exemplary and not limiting except as defined in the claims appended hereto.

I claim:

1. A package marking device comprising a cylindrical rotary marking roller mounted for free rotation and having marking indicia on its cylindrical surface and adapted to rotate in frictional tangentially applied driving contact to impart print to the surface of a package in rolling contact therewith, an aligning roller mounted tangentially for frictional rolling contact with said marking roller said aligning roller being mounted out of the path of movement of said package to be marked, a cut-away portion on said marking roller and adapted to interrupt tangential continuity between said roller surfaces and interrupt frictional driving contact therebetween, means for rotating said aligning roller and thereby rotating said marking roller in frictional rolling contact therewith until alignment with the cut-away portion is reached, thereby aligning the print on said marking roller in marking position for a package brought into rolling contact therewith.

2. The marking device as defined in claim 1 wherein said marking roller has stop means fixed to interrupt and stop rotary movement thereof when its cut-away portion coincides with the tangential driving portion of said aligning roller interrupting tangential drive continuity.

3. The marking device as defined in claim 1 wherein said marking roller has stop means fixed to intercept and stop rotary movement thereof when its cut-away portion coincides with the tangential driving portion of said aligning roller and a stop means disengaging arm extending outward into the path of packages to be marked, whereby an approaching package to be marked in rolling contact with said marking roller first engages said stop means disengaging arm, freeing said marking roller for rotary marking contact with the package to be marked.

4. The marking device as defined in claim 1 wherein the center portion of said aligning roller comprises a smooth ink receiving and transfer surface adapted to transfer a film of ink to the marking indicia on said marking roller in rolling tangential contact therewith.

5. The marking device as defined in claim 1 wherein the center portion of said aligning roller comprises a smooth ink receiving and transfer surface adapted to transfer a film of ink therefrom in tangential rolling contact with the indicia on said marking roller, and a rotary mounted cylindrical inking roller having an inking felt about its cylindrical surface, said inking felt being positioned in ink transferring rolling contact with the center portion of said aligning roller.

6. A package marking device comprising a cylindrical rotary marking roller mounted for free rotation and having marking indicia on its cylindrical surface and adapted to rotate in frictional tangentially applied driving contact to impart print to the surface of a pack-age in rolling contact therewith, an aligning roller mounted tangentially for frictional rolling contact with said marking roller said aligning roller being mounted out of the path of movement of said package to be marked, a cut-away portion on said marking roller adapted to interrupt tangential continuity between said roller surfaces and interrupt frictional driving contact therebetween, means for rotating said aligning roller and thereby rotating said marking roller in continuous rolling contact to aligned stop position with the said cut-away portion, thereby aligning the print on said marking roller in marking position for a package brought into rolling contact therewith, stop means on said marking roller, means cooperative with said stop means to intercept and stop rotary movement of said marking roller when its cut-away portion coincides with the tangential driving portion of said aligning roller and a stop means disengaging arm extending outward from the cylindrical surface of said marking roller into thepath of packages to be marked, whereby an approaching package to be marked in rolling contact with said marking roller first engages said stop means disengaging arm, freeing said marking roller for rotary marking contact with the package to be marked.

7. A package marking device comprising a cylindrical rotary marking roller mounted for free rotation and having marking indicia on its cylindrical surface and adapted to rotate in frictional tangentially applied driving contact to impart print to the surface of a package in rolling contact therewith, an aligning roller mounted tangentially for frictional rolling contact with said marking roller said aligning roller being mounted out of the path of movement of said package to be marked, a cut-away portion on said marking roller adapted to interrupt tangential continuity between said roller surfaces and interrupt frictional driving contact therebetween, said aligning roller having a smooth center portion in ink receiving and transferring contact with the indicia on the cylindrical surface of said marking roller, a rotary mounted cylindrical inking roller having a cylindrical inking felt mounted about its cylindrical surface, said inking felt being positioned in rolling contact with the center portion of said aligning roller to impart a film of ink thereto, means for rotating said aligning roller and thereby rotating both said inking felt in ink imparting contact therewith and said marking roller to impart a film of ink to the marking indicia on said marking roller and to align said marking roller in continuous rolling contact to aligned stop position with the said cut-away portion, thereby aligning the print on said marking roller in marking position for a package brought into rolling contact therewith, stop means on said marking roller, means cooperative with said stop means to intercept and stop rotary movement of said marking roller when its cut-away portion coincides with the tangential driving portion of said aligning roller and a stop means disengaging arm extending outward from the cylindrical surf-ace of said marking roller into the path of packages to be marked, whereby an approaching package to be marked in rolling contact with said marking roller first engages said step means disengaging arm, freeing said marking roller for rotary marking contact with the package to be marked.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,130,682 3/1915 Augensen 101-35 1,244,524 10/ 1917 Marshall 101245 X 1,597,100 8/1926 Moore 10135 2,195,135 3/1940 Ser-ai 101-35 2,746,380 5/1956 Gottscho 101-35 2,889,767 6/ 1959 Hir-schey et a1 10135 ROBERT E. PULFREY, Primary Examiner.

WILLIAM F. MCCARTHY, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1130682 *Jun 20, 1912Mar 2, 1915Sanitary Can CompanyCombined counting and stamping mechanism.
US1244524 *May 3, 1916Oct 30, 1917William E MarshallCheck-indorsing machine.
US1597100 *May 11, 1925Aug 24, 1926Lechtman Printing CoBook-edge-printing machine
US2195135 *Sep 19, 1939Mar 26, 1940Hawaiian Pineapple Co LtdRotary stamping machine
US2746380 *Oct 16, 1952May 22, 1956Gottscho Inc AdolphMarking devices
US2889767 *Dec 22, 1955Jun 9, 1959Gottscho Inc AdolphMarking apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4111624 *Oct 28, 1976Sep 5, 1978Hanson Douglas RDough piece imprinter and controls therefore
US4142465 *May 5, 1977Mar 6, 1979Lawtons Of Liverpool LimitedRotary wheel printing machine
US4444108 *Aug 4, 1982Apr 24, 1984Markem CorporationPrinting apparatus and process
US4580495 *May 20, 1985Apr 8, 1986Finest Marking Supplies, Inc.Printing device with disposable cartridge
US4627342 *Sep 27, 1984Dec 9, 1986E.D.M. CorporationHeated sleeve printing roll couple with clutch-brake unit control
US4893952 *Oct 16, 1987Jan 16, 1990Bell & Howell CompanyDot matrix printing system including improved ink transfer mechanism
US5224422 *Mar 17, 1992Jul 6, 1993John MarozziFlexographic printing system
US5341737 *Apr 8, 1993Aug 30, 1994John MarozziFlexographic printing system
US5355798 *Nov 12, 1993Oct 18, 1994Yoder Jr Donald EIntermittent motion rotary printing press
US5421258 *Dec 10, 1993Jun 6, 1995John MarozziFlexographic printing system
US5429049 *Oct 13, 1994Jul 4, 1995John MarozziFlexographic printing system
US5558020 *May 12, 1995Sep 24, 1996John MarozziFlexographic printing system
US6644185Nov 6, 2000Nov 11, 2003Greydon Inc.Flexographic rotary platen printing press
US6834588Sep 15, 2003Dec 28, 2004Greydon Inc.Flexographic rotary platen printing press
US7100507Dec 27, 2004Sep 5, 2006Greydon, Inc.Flexographic rotary platen printing press
US20040060468 *Sep 15, 2003Apr 1, 2004Rochon Gregory P.Flexographic rotary platen printing press
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/35, 101/329, 101/235
International ClassificationB41F17/26, B41F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41F17/26
European ClassificationB41F17/26