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Publication numberUS3260358 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1966
Filing dateJan 27, 1964
Priority dateJan 27, 1964
Publication numberUS 3260358 A, US 3260358A, US-A-3260358, US3260358 A, US3260358A
InventorsGottily Arthur L, Thomas John L
Original AssigneeMonsanto Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shrink wrapped textile shipping package
US 3260358 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 12, 1966 A. GOTTILY ET AL 3,260,358

SHRINK WRAPPED TEXTILE SHIPPING PACKAGE Filed Jan. 27, 1964 FIG. 3. BY mwwv z AGENT United States Patent 3,260,358 SHRINK WRAPPED TEXTHLE SHIPPING PACKAGE Arthur L. Gottily and John L. Thomas, Pensacola, Fla.,

assignors to Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MCI-9 a corporation of Delaware Filed Ian. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 340,434 8 Claims. (Cl. 206-46) This invention relates to a textile shipping package and, more particularly relates to a shrink wrapping yarn shipping package.

In textile practice, bobbins, tubes and the like packaged with yarn must be individually wrapped before shipment to other destinations to keep the yarn immaculately clean, fresh and undamaged. Typically, each bobbin includes a disc mounted at one end and additionally a tag containing printed matter identifying the type of yarn wound on the bobbin clamped in the disc. Bobbins prepared for shipment, presently, are completely enveloped or covered by loosely fitting transparent sheaths of film material to protect the yarn. The sheaths are not shrunk on the bobbins. Certain disadvantages are encountered when bobbins are wrapped in the known manner. The loose fit makes the cover sheaths prone to tearing and snagging. Further, the sheaths cover the tags with the printed matter and obscure the printing making it difficult to identify the type of yarn on the bobbin. Also, the sheaths are not readily removable from the bobbins. A still further disadvantage is that a loose covering sheath does not prevent the yarn windings on a bobbin from slipping and sloughing when subjected to vibrations and movement in shipment.

It is a primary object of this invention to provide a novel yarn shipping package comprising a yarn holder or bobbin supplied with yarn and covered with a shrinktype film enveloped designed to protect the yarn on the holder, to permit clear visual observation of printed matter on the holder and to permit facile removal of the envelope therefrom.

Another object of the invention is to provide a shrink wrapped textile shipping package in which the yarn windings are supported in shipment.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the detailed description which follows and the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the yarn shipping package in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the shrink-type film envelope used to protect the yarn on the yarn shipping package embodying the invention; and

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view illustrating the ease of removal of the shrink film envelope from the bobbin.

In accordance with the invention, the novel yarn shipping package comprises a yarn filled bobbin wrapped in an envelope of thermoplastic material heat shrunk upon the bobbin. The envelope prior to shrinkage is, preferably, rectangular and elongated and made larger than the yarn filled bobbin. One end of the envelope is open while the opposite end is closed and the closed end has a centrally arranged aperture. A pair of oppositely arranged lines of perforations or scores extend from the aperture and along the length of the envelope to facilitate tearing of the envelope from the bobbin. Tab means 3,26%,358 Patented July 12, 1966 are provided adjacent the closed end of the envelope and between the pair of oppositely arranged lines of perforations for manually gripping the envelope and applying a tearing force to the perforated lines.

Referring to the drawing, FIGURES 1 to 3, the yarn shipping package 1 embodying the invention comprises a yarn holder or bobbin 2 filled with yarn and a shrink type film envelope 3 tightly heat shrunk upon the bobbin 2. Bobbin 2, preferably, is tubular and elongate and has a disc 4 mounted in the opening at one end thereof. Disc 4 contains a tag with printed matter thereon identifying the yarn on the bobbin. Bobbin 2 is ordinarily headless; that is, no end flanges are provided as in a spool. Windings of filamentary material are disposed about the periphery of the bobbin and along its length except for a short distance from each end thereof exemplary of the conventional winding practice. Provision for the securement of a transfer tail for the packaged yarn may be made at one end of the bobbin 2.

The envelope 3 is made of a supple transparent shrinktype film, preferably, formed from a synthetic polymeric thermoplastic substance such as polyethylene. Other suitable thermoplastic polymers such as polypropylene polyvmylchloride, etc., may be used. Envelope 3 ac cording to the illustrated construction is formed from a rectangular integral blank of predetermined suitable gauge and size. The blank is doubled over to form a folded end 5 and the edges 6 and 7 extending perpendicularly from the folded end are heat-sealed or welded in conventional manner. The end opposite the folded end 5 1s open to accommodate the insertion therein of bobbin 2. A central aperture 8 is provided in the folded end 5 of envelope 3 to permit visual observation of the printed indicia disposed in disc 4.

Envelope 3 has a pair of oppositely arranged lines of perforations, scores or cuts 9, each line of perforations 9 originating at the aperture 8 at the folded end 5 of envelope 3 and extending along the length thereof. Prior to the envelope 3 being shrunk, the scores or cuts 9 are from 7 to of an inch and preferably of an inch in length, and are spaced apart from to of an inch. Preferably, the width of the cuts 9 are not greater than .006 of an inch. If the cuts 9 are too short or the spaces between the cuts 9 are too large, the envelope 3 will not tear effectively. If the cuts 9 are made too wide there is a possibility that dust, moisture or other foreign elements will enter the envelope 3.

Envelope 3 is provided with a pair of oppositely disposed gripping tabs 14) each arranged on a respective edge, 5 and 6, adjacent the folded end 5. The tabs 10 are preferably formed of a non-shrinkable or low shrinkage type material having a rigid or semi-rigid property. Tabs 10 may be formed from a length .of tape material with an adhesive backing for securement to envelope 3. The tabs 10 serve as gripping means as well as a means for preventing shrinkage of a portion of the envelope 3.

When manufactured, envelope 3 should be sized to fit around bobbin 2 loosely and should be longer in length so that the envelope 3 will shrink around the base of the bobbin when subjected to heat. The size of envelope 3 will, therefore, be determined by the dimensions of the yarn packaged bobbin.

After bobbin 2 is packaged with yarn and supplied with a disc 4 containing the yarn identifying information, envelope 3 is spread apart at its open end and drawn over bobbin 2 so that aperture 8 is aligned with disc 4 and positioned in close adjacency therewith.

The covered yarn shipping package is then thermally conditioned such as by placing the package in a heat conditioner. The application of heat shrinks the envelope 3 so that the bobbin 2 and the yarn wound thereon are completely encapsulated with the exception of the area around the disc 4 which is uncovered by the provision of aperture 8 on the envelope 3. The aperture 8 contracts or shrinks tightly around disc 4. The yarn shipping package is then removed from the heat conditioner and placed into a carton for shipment.

At the point of destination, the envelope 3 is easily removed from bobbin 2 by the method shown in FIGURE 3. Holding the novel shipping package in one hand, half of the envelope 3 can be torn away wit-h the other hand by smartly pulling on the tab to apply a tearing effort at the line of perforations 9. Having torn away the upper portion of the envelope 3 the bobbin 2 can then be placed on a rack post of a bobbin carrier while still holding onto the bottom portion, thus permitting minimum of hand contact with the yarn.

The novel shrink wrapped textile yarn package, as provided, is compact, protected, easily identified, and readily unwrapped. The envelope 3 holds or supports the yarn wraps on the bobbin 2 and prevents sloughing of the wraps. It will be understood that the envelope 3 construction may be modified by placing the lines of perforations in parallel close relation rather than in opposed relation if it is desirable to remove the envelope 3 from the bobbin in other than half sections.

Further modifications and variations are contemplated within the spirit of the invention and the invention is intended to be limited only by the scope of the following claims and not by the illustrated form of the invention.

We claim:

1. A shrink wrapped textile package comprising in combination,

(a) an elongated yarn holder having windings of filamentary material thereabout,

(b) indicia means mounted at one end of said holder,

() a thermoplastic shrink film envelope, open at one end and closed at its opposite end thereof, and being of larger dimension than said holder wound with filamentary material,

((1) an aperture formed in the closed end of said envelope,

(e) a plurality of spaced perforate lines formed in said envelope, each line extending from said aperture substantially along the length of said envelope,

(f) tab means for preventing shrink-age of an associated portion of said shrink film envelope to form a grip, said tab means being joined to said envelope adjacent said aperture and between said plurality of perforate lines thereof,

(g) said envelope being drawn over said holder so that said aperture surrounds said indicia means and then being shrunk tightly around said yarn holder to totally encapsulate all but said one end of said holder with said indicia means thereon.

2. A shrink wrapped textile package as in claim 1, wherein the perforations in said perforate lines are of an inch in length.

3. A shrink wrapped textile package as in claim 1, wherein the perforations in said perforate lines are not larger than .006 of an inch in width.

4. A shrink wrapped textile package as in claim 3, wherein said perforations in said perforate lines are Within %2 to of an inch in length and are spaced apart from to W of an inch.

5. A shrink wrapped textile package comprising in combination,

(a) an elongated yarn holder having windings of filamentary material thereabout,

(b) indicia means mounted at one end of said holder,

(c) a thermoplastic shrink film envelope, open at one end and closed at its opposite end thereof, and being of larger dimension than said holder wound with filamentary material,

(d) an aperture formed in the closed end of said envelope,

(e) oppositely disposed perforate lines formed in said envelope, each line extending from said aperture substantially along the length of said envelope,

(f) oppositely disposed tab means adapted to prevent shrinkage of joined portions of said shrink film envelope to form a pair of grips, said oppositely disposed tab means being joined with said envelope adjacent said aperture and between said plurality of perforate lines thereof,

(g) said envelope being drawn over said holder so that said aperture surrounds said indicia means and then being shrunk tightly around said yarn holder to totally encapsulate all but said one end of said holder with said indicia means thereon.

6. A shrink wrapped textile package comprising in combination,

(a) an elongated yarn holder having windings of filamentary material thereabout, one end portion of said holder being headless and clear of filamentary wind- (b) indicia means mounted at said headless end portion of said yarn holder,

(0) a transparent shrink film envelope of thermoplastic material, open at one end and closed at its opposite end thereof, and being of larger dimension than said yarn holder wound with filamentary material,

(d) an aperture formed in the closed end of said envelope,

(e) a pair of oppositely disposed perforate lines formed in said envelope, each line extend-ing from said aperture along the length of said envelope,

(f) a pair of oppositely disposed non-shrinkable tabs, each tab being attached to said envelope adjacent said aperture and between said pair of oppositely disposed perforate lines, and being adapted to prevent shrinkage of joined portions of said envelope,

(g) said envelope being drawn over said yarn holder so that said aperture surrounds said indicia means and then being shrunk tightly around said yarn holder to totally encapsulate all but said one end portion of said holder with said indicia means there- 7. A shrink wrapped textile package comprising in combination,

(a) an elongated yarn holder having windings of filamentary material thereabout, one end portion of said holder being headless and clear of filamentary windings,

( b) indicia means mounted at said headless end portion of said yarn holder,

(c) a transparent shrink film rectangular envelope of thermoplastic material formed from a blank doubled over to form a line of fold across the width of said blank and to form superimposed edges extending from the line of fold, said edges being sealed together,

(d) a central aperture formed in said line of fold of said envelope,

(e) a pair of oppositely disposed perforate lines formed in said envelope, each line extending from said aperture along the length of said envelope,

(f) a pair of oppositely disposed non-shrinkable tabs,

each of said tabs being positively secured to a respective edge of said envelope adjacent said aperture, and being adapted to prevent shrinkage of joined portions of said envelope,

(g) said envelope being drawn over said yarn holder .so that said aperture surrounds said ind icia means and then being shrunk tightly around said yarn holder to totally encapsulate all but said one end portion of said holder with said indicia means thereon.

8. A shrink Wrapped textile package as in claim 7, wherein said rectangular envelope is made of polyethylene.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,997,426 4/1935 Morse 20664 6 2,554,841 5/1951 Rumsey 20645.33 3,047,140 7/ 1962 Robins 20656 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,263,829 5/1961 France.

11,655 of 1906 Great Britain. 323,344 1/ 1930 Great Britain. 871,592 6/1961 Great Britain.

10 LOUIS G. MA'NCENE, Primary Examiner.

GEORGE O. RALSTON, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3321073 *Sep 13, 1965May 23, 1967Bemberg AgCop package
US3353326 *Feb 1, 1965Nov 21, 1967Reynolds Metals CoMethod of making a carrying case for bottles or the like
US3380577 *Apr 10, 1967Apr 30, 1968Du PontFilament package
US3382971 *Oct 16, 1964May 14, 1968Eastman Kodak CoPackaging twine
US3396835 *Dec 20, 1966Aug 13, 1968RhodiacetaYarn packaging and method of making
US3399761 *Jun 19, 1967Sep 3, 1968Asahi Chemical IndYarn package
US3410394 *Oct 16, 1964Nov 12, 1968Phillips Petroleum CoPackaging articles with heat shrinkable tubing
US3424306 *Jan 15, 1968Jan 28, 1969Union Carbide CorpPackage and method of producing same
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US4467916 *Apr 26, 1982Aug 28, 1984Ppg Industries, Inc.Tubular glass fiber package and method
US4480751 *Dec 30, 1983Nov 6, 1984Haemonetics CorporationApparatus for collecting, storing and dispensing frozen blood plasma
US4546880 *Jun 2, 1983Oct 15, 1985Ppg Industries, Inc.Shippable package of glass fiber strands and process for making the package and continuous strand mat
US4690281 *Jan 15, 1987Sep 1, 1987Compagnie Gervais DanoneAssembly for storing, transporting and distributing objects of the bottle, flask or similar types and process for manufacturing same
US4777054 *Nov 6, 1986Oct 11, 1988Perfect Holdings, Ltd.Easy open package
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US5893460 *Oct 19, 1994Apr 13, 1999Halpak Plastics, Inc.Shrinkable tubing with integral tear strip
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US7963413May 23, 2006Jun 21, 2011Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcTamper evident resealable closure
US8114451Dec 27, 2006Feb 14, 2012Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcResealable closure with package integrity feature
US8308363Aug 8, 2006Nov 13, 2012Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcPackage integrity indicator for container closure
US8408792Mar 30, 2007Apr 2, 2013Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcPackage integrity indicating closure
US8722122Nov 5, 2012May 13, 2014Intercontinental Great Brands LlcPackage integrity indicator for container closure
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/410, 206/459.5, 206/497, 383/209, 229/87.5
International ClassificationB65D75/00, B65D75/58, B65D75/52
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/002, B65D75/5827
European ClassificationB65D75/00B, B65D75/58E