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Publication numberUS3261033 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1966
Filing dateSep 21, 1964
Priority dateSep 21, 1964
Publication numberUS 3261033 A, US 3261033A, US-A-3261033, US3261033 A, US3261033A
InventorsErnest N Martin
Original AssigneeErnest N Martin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baby crib shakers
US 3261033 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. N. MARTIN BABY CRIB JSHAKERS July 19, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FiledSeDt. 21, 1964 INVENTOR Ernest N. Morfin BY FULWIDER PATTONIRIEBER LEE MTEcHT Attornevs July 19, 1966 -rm 3,261,033

BABY CRIB SHAKERS Filed Sept. 21, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 44- NL M INVENTOR. 92 64 44-\u Ernest N. Martin 1385 FULV I ID ER, PATTON R IEBER 142 42 LEE & UTECHT Attorneys United States Patent 3,261,033 BABY CRIB SHAKERS Ernest N. Martin, 1141 High St., Escondido, Calif. Filed Sept. 21, 1964, Ser. No. 397,962 Claims. (Cl. 5109) The present invention relates to a baby crib, and more particularly to a crib which is caused to vibrate in response to the crying of the child within the crib, such vibrations simulating the rocking or shaking of the crib by a person who is endeavoring to sooth the crying child.

The present invention contemplates the use of an electric motor for creating the vibrations. The electric motor is attached to the crib. A weight is eccentrically disposed with respect to the shaft, and the eccentricity of the weight causes vibrations to be imparted to the crib as the weight is rotated about an axis. Means is provided for progressively deterring increase of speed of rotation of the motor and weight as the motor is progressively overcoming inertness to movement of the weight. In the present embodiment the weight is s pported in such manner by the shaft so that it not only is rotated by the shaft but by centrifugal force is movable outwardly relative to the shaft. Means is provided in the form of a spring for resisting outward movement of the Weight.

A microphone is positioned in sound receiving relationship with the baby in the crib and the motor is controlled by the microphone. The microphone includes a vibrator. A plurality of passages are formed in front of the vibrator.

In the preferred embodiment, the motor, the weight and the microphone comprises a unit which is removably supported by the crib.

Timing mechanism is provided for rendering the motor ineffective after a predetermined length of time provided the baby in the crib is not, for example, crying. Microphone responsive mechanism is provided also for deceleration of amplitude of vibration of the crib when the baby becomes quiet during said predetermined time.

Other features and the advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a baby crib with the vibrator unit attached thereto;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view, in section, of the crib side wall showing the vibrator unit attached thereto, the section being taken along line 22 of FIG. 1, and showing the housing leading to the vibrator of the microphone in section;

FIG. 3 is a front view of the unit, but showing the cover for the right and left sides and the front removed;

FIG. 4 is va right side view of the unit, but showing the cover for right and left sides and the front removed;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary top view of the unit, showing the timing mechanism for actuating a micro switch, and showing the operating arm of the switch in switch closed position, part of the casing being shown in section, the section being taken along line 55 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, but showing the operating arm of the switch in switch open position;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 77 of FIG. 5, but on a larger scale;

FIG. 8 is fragmentary top plan view of the weight in its inactive or motor starting position, the view being taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8, but showing the weight in its fully outwardly extended position, which it assumes when the motor is operating at full speed;

FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic view of the electrical system; and

3,261,933 Patented July 19, 1966 FIG. 11 is a front view of the housing leading to the vibrator of the microphone looking in the direction of arrow 11 in FIG. 2.

Referring generally to the drawings, the crib is shown at 20 having an open top bed section 22 formed by a bottom wall (not shown) and side walls 24 and end walls 26. The bed section is carried by four legs 28. The unit 30 is supported by either of the ends or either of the side walls, it being shown at removable support on one of the side walls 24. The unit 30 includes a casing 32 which is carried by a bracket 34. The bracket is welded to the rear of the casing, the upper portion 36 being of inverted U-shape for hooking over the top edge of the crib wall 24. A screw 38 is threaded into portion 36 and against the wall 24 for locking the unit in position on the crib.

A microphone 40 is carried by the top of the bracket 34. The unit 30 is placed on the crib in such position that the microphone is near the head of the child in the crib. The microphone is connected through suitable electric current amplifying means 42 to close a switch 44 to an electric motor 46.

The vertical shaft 48, which is driven by the motor 46, carries weight means including a horizontally extending arm and a weight 52. Weight 52 is pivotally carried by a pin 54 on the outer end of arm 50, whereby, by centrifugal force, it is moved outwardly of the motor shaft when the motor is rotated. A spring 56 normally resists outward movement of the weight.

The weight 52 being eccentrically mounted with respect to the axis about which it rotates, causes vibrations to be imparted to the crib. The frequency of vibrations simulate the usual movement imparted to the crib manually when it is desirable to sooth the child in the crib.

A timing mechanism 60 can be actuated to manually start the motor and set to render the motor ineffective after a predetermined selected interval of time.

A conductor 62, including a resistance 64 and a switch 66, is connected in parallel circuit relationship with the switch 44, whereby when the child stops crying and the switch 44 is opened, a circuit is maintained to the motor 46 but includes the resistance 64 to decrease the speed of the motor and thereby cause deceleration of amplitude of vibration of the crib. The switch 66 is opened after a predetermined length of time to thereby render the motor inoperative.

Referring more in detail to the drawings, the casing 30 includes a back wall 68 to which the bracket 34 is welded; it also includes a bottom wall 70, a top wall 72 and a removable cover 74 including opposite side walls 76 and a front wall 78. A bracket 80 is attached to the bottom wall by screws 82 and 84, there being a longitudinally extending slot 86 for providing for sliding of the bracket 80 forwardly and rearwardl y. Screw 84 is of the thumb screw type for fixing the bracket 80 in adjusted position. The bent-down end 88 of the bracket is adapted to bear against the outer side of a wall of the crib.

The motor 46 includes a laminated field frame 90 which carries a field winding 92. The motor shaft 48 is fixed to a rotating armature 94. The shaft extends vertically and the weight 52 is disposed below the field frame and armature. Two vertically extending lugs 96 are attached to and extend upwardly from the field frame 90. These lugs are internally threaded for receiving screws 98, see FIG. 1. These screws fasten the motor and the depending weight 52 to the top wall 72 of the casing 30.

The base plate 100 for the timing mechanism is also supported by the top wall 72 of casing 30 through the screws 98. The base plate rests on the top of lugs 96 and is spaced fromthe top wall 72 by hollow spacers 102, which receive the screws 98. By tightening screws 98, the frame and base plate are fixed to the underside of top wall 72.

The motor shaft 48 extends upwardly through an opening in the base plate 100 and carries a toothed pinion 104 above the base plate. This pinion drives a disk 106 through suitably toothed gear speed reducing wheels generally indicated at 108. A clutch spring 110 is interposed between the under side of disk 106 and one of the speed reduction gears 112. Gear 112 is fixed to a shaft 114 which is journaled in a socket type bearing 116, the latter being fixed to base plate 100. The clutch spring 110 is fixed to disk 106, and this assembly is rotatable on and relative to the shaft 114. A sleeve 117 extends through top wall 72 of the casing 30, and the extended end carries a wheel 118 which is held in place by a pin 120 and a screw 122. The disk 106 is provided with a hole 124 for receiving the downwardly extending finger 126 of a detent 128. This detent is fastened in any suitable member to the lower end of the sleeve 117.

A spring 130 is interposed between the bottom of top wall 72 and the disk 106, and normally urges the disk 106 and leaf spring 110 into driven relationship with the gear wheel 112, whereby rotation of the gear wheel 112 will cause rotation of the disk 106.

The disk 106 is provided with a notch 132 in the periphery thereof for receiving the roller 134 on the contact actuating arm 136 of the micro switch 138. This switch includes the contacts 66. When the arm 136 is in the position shown in FIG. 5, the contacts 66 are closed and when the arm is in the position shown in FIG. 6, the contacts are separated. The arm is biased by a spring (not shown) to contact opening position.

Thus it is apparent from the foregoing that when the child begins to cry, a relay coil 138 will be energized through the microphone 40 and amplifier 42 to close a circuit to the motor winding 92, the circuit including a lead line 140, contacts of switch 44, wire 142, coil 92, and lead line 144. The rotation of the motor will cause vibrations to be imparted to the crib due to the eccentric mounting of the weight 52. The motor will continue to operate as long as the child is crying. However, should the child stop crying prior to the time that the notch 132 in the disk is moved to a position in which the switch actuating arm 136 toreceive the roller 134, then in that event the motor is no longer energized through contacts of switch 44, due to the fact that the relay coil 138 is deenergized, but the motor is maintained operative through the circuit including lead line 140, wire 62, contacts 66, resistance 64, field coil 92, and lead line 144. The resistance, being in the circuit, effects desirable slower rotation of the motor and deceleration of the amplitude of vibrations imparted to the crib.

It has been found in actual practice that if an eccentrically mounted weight is rotated about an axis and is not permitted to move outwardly, and sufficient torque is applied to the motor for starting the rotation of the weight, then in that event, after the inertia of starting the rotation of the weight is overcome, then the power supplied to the motor effects too rapid revolutions of the weight, whereby, instead of imparting soothing vibrations to the crib, annoying vibration takes place.

To overcome this defect, I have discovered that by constructing the weight means so that the parts thereof are substantially counter-balanced when the shaft is idle, the inertia of starting is overcome, readily. In the example shown in FIG. 8, the weight means comprising the arm 50 and the weight 52- is such that one part of the weight 50 lies on one side of a straight line intersecting the axis of the shaft 48 and the axis of pivot pin 54 and another part lies on the opposite side of that line, whereby the weight means is substantially counterbalanced when the shaft is idle and ample power can be delivered to the motor for that purpose, and as the centrifugal force tends to increase, the weight 52 moves outwardly, imposing increasing torque to be overcome,

whereby the motor speed is maintained at speeds for imparting the desired vibrations to the crib. I have also discovered that by the use of an outwardly movable weight, the relative speed of the motor is adjusted automatically, depending upon the resistance to vibration offered by the crib. Thus, the same frequency of vibrations is imparted to cribs regardless of the resistances of vibrations which they offer.

The motor and weight can be set into motion manually, as for example, any length of time up to fifteen minutes if the gear train is of the type for completing a cycle of rotation of the disk in fifteen minutes. This is accomplished by turning the disk 106, by wheel 118, in a counter clockwise direction as, for example, moving the disk from the position shown in FIG. 7 to a position shown in FIG. 6. As the roller 134 is being cammed outwardly by the surface of the notch 132, the circuit to the motor will be established through the micro switch 138 and the circuit will be maintained until the roller moves to the substantially extreme inner position in the switch.

Also the wheel 118 may be used for manually stopping the motor by turning the disk 106 in a clockwise direction by wheel 118. Such movement is through the detent 128, i.e., the finger 126 thereof engaging the wall forming the opening 124 in disk 106. That end of the detent which is opposite finger 126 is provided with a notch 146 of such contour that it is prevented from further clockwise movement after it is moved against the roller 134 when the roller is within the notch 132. Thus, when an attempt is made to stop the motor by the wheel 118, the disk 106 cannot be moved manually beyond the stopping position.

It will be observed that the hole 124 in the disk 106 is somewhat larger than the width of finger 126 of detent 28. Thus when the disk 106 is moved in a clockwise direction, i.e., upon starting of the disk by the starting of the motor in response for demand for starting by the microphone 40, the detent cannot prevent this clockwise movement since the disk .can move clockwise underneath the detent. The size of the hole 124 permits rela tive movement of the disk and detent to such extent that the extreme outer end 148, which would prevent clockwise movement of the disk, is not effective since the lost motion connection through the hole 124 allows clockwise movement of the disk underneath the detent as the roller climbs upwardly out of the notch 132.

After a predetermined movement of the disk 106 in a clockwise direction, a leaf spring, not shown, riding on the periphery of the disk, will move inwardly over a shoulder, not shown, on the periphery of the disk. Thereafter the disk cannot be moved in a counter-clockwise direction because if such attempt were made, the shoulder would engage the leaf spring, which latter then functions as a stop. Thus the disk cannot be moved counter-clockwise to a motor stopping position. The motor can be stopped only when there is no demand from the microphone, and, if there is no demand from the microphone, the motor can be stopped only by a clockwise movement of the disk, either by the motor or by turning the wheel 118 clockwise.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 12, the inlet nipple 152 leading to the vibrator (not shown) of the microphone is confronted by a housing 154 having a plurality of passages 156. It has been. found that such construction causes the vibrator of the microphone to concentrate readily to noises created by the child in the crib and to shield the vibrator from extraneous noises about the crib.

While the form of embodiment herein shown and described, constitutes preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms may be adopted falling within the scope of the claims that follow.

I claim:

1. In combination:

(A) A vibratable baby crib having legs, the lower ends,

thereof resting stationarily on a floor;

(B) a rotatable shaft;

(C) an electric motor for rotating the shaft;

(D) means for supporting the electric motor and the shaft by the crib with said shaft on a vertical axis;

(E) a weight extending from one side of the shaft;

(F) means for supporting the Weight for rotatable movement by the shaft and for horizontal outward movement relative to the shaft for imparting vibrator movement to the crib;

(G) and means for maintaining the vibratory movement which is imparted to the crib by the rotation of the weight at a constant frequency, comprising a spring disposed to yieldingly resist outward movement of the weight relative to the shaft.

2. A combination comprising:

(A) A vibratable baby crib having legs, the lower ends of which rest stationarily on a floor;

(B) a rotatable shaft;

(C) an electric motor for rotating the shaft;

(D) means for supporting the electric motor and the shaft by the crib with the shaft on a vertical axis;

(E) weight means on the shaft including:

(1) weight parts disposed for substantially counterbalancing one another about the axis of said vertical shaft when the shaft is idle and becoming progressively eccentric as the speed of rotation of the shaft increases for imparting to the crib an essentially vibratory, horizontal motion at a constant frequency.

3. A combination comprising:

(A) A vibratable baby crib having legs, the lowered ends of which rest stationarily on a floor;

(B) means for imparting to the crib an essentially vibratory, horizontal motion at a constant speed, said means comprising:

(1) a rotatable shaft;

(2) an electric motor for rotating the shaft;

(3) means for supporting the electric motor and the shaft by the crib with the shaft on a vertical axis; (4) weight means on the shaft, said weight means including:

(a) weight parts disposed for substantially counter-balancing one another about the axis of said vertical shaft when the shaft is idle and becoming progressively eccentric as the speed of the rotation of the shaft increases.

4. A combination as defined in claim 3, characterized in that one of the weight parts includes an arm fixed to and extending horizontally of the shaft and another part pivotally carried by the arm and extending to a position to substantially counterbalance the weight means when the shaft is idle;

(5) and means pivotally connecting said other part with this arm. 5. A combination as defined in claim 3, characterized to include:

(5) a spring yieldingly resisting progressive eccentric movement of the weight means.

References Cited by the Examiner FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

R. D. KRAUS, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3529311 *Jul 1, 1968Sep 22, 1970Crawford N BCrib bouncer for tranquilizing infants
US3656195 *Nov 25, 1969Apr 18, 1972Joseph R LeaheyInfant{40 s bed
US3797273 *Jun 1, 1972Mar 19, 1974Interroyal CorpAdjustable bed motor mount
US3952343 *Jul 29, 1974Apr 27, 1976Gim WongAutomatic baby crib rocker
US4193648 *Apr 21, 1978Mar 18, 1980Antonio GargiuloMusic-box casing
US4856130 *Dec 23, 1988Aug 15, 1989Shlomo BerkovichDevice for rocking a baby carriage
US4893366 *Mar 1, 1988Jan 16, 1990Rosen Karl GCrib with vibration attenuating means
US5003651 *Oct 2, 1989Apr 2, 1991Rosen Karl GCrib with vibration attenuating means
US5806113 *May 9, 1997Sep 15, 1998Mcmahan; MichaelMotion controlled cradle
US5947552 *Aug 14, 1997Sep 7, 1999Mattel, Inc.Infant-supporting device
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US6851745Apr 12, 2002Feb 8, 2005Fisher-Price, Inc.Collapsible bassinet/infant seat with canopy
US6966082Nov 4, 2003Nov 22, 2005Bloemer, Meiser & Westerkemp, LlpApparatus and method for reciprocating an infant support
US7395560Oct 25, 2005Jul 8, 2008Bloemer, Meiser & Westerkamp, LlcApparatus and method for reciprocating a person
US7455353Feb 3, 2006Nov 25, 2008Mattel, Inc.Collapsible bassinet/infant seat with canopy
US7537285 *Sep 8, 2005May 26, 2009Stewart Laverne LDevice that automatically rocks a rocking a chair and similar articles
US7958579Oct 23, 2007Jun 14, 2011Bloemer, Meiser & Westerkamp, LlcSystem for providing cyclic motion
US8294308May 13, 2011Oct 23, 2012Bloemer, Meiser & Westerkamp, LlcSystem for providing cyclic motion
DE3590637C2 *Dec 4, 1985Sep 10, 1992Karl RosenVorrichtung zur Beruhigung von Kleinkindern
EP0054423A1 *Dec 14, 1981Jun 23, 1982McGrillen, Arthur RobertDevice for use with a perambulator
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WO1990002505A1 *Sep 6, 1989Mar 22, 1990Gines CanovasDevice for mechanically rocking young children
WO2013087955A1 *Dec 3, 2012Jun 20, 2013Domingue Fernandez Marco AntonioPortable rocker/playback device
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/109, 5/915, 5/904
International ClassificationB06B1/10, A47D9/04
Cooperative ClassificationB06B1/10, Y10S5/904, A47D9/04, Y10S5/915
European ClassificationA47D9/04, B06B1/10