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Publication numberUS3261493 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1966
Filing dateApr 18, 1963
Priority dateApr 18, 1963
Publication numberUS 3261493 A, US 3261493A, US-A-3261493, US3261493 A, US3261493A
InventorsSmith Donald G
Original AssigneeLockheed Aircraft Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Structural joint for a cargo container
US 3261493 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 19, 1966 D. G. SMITH 3,

STRUCTURAL JOINT FOR A CARGO CONTAINER Filed April 18, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ammy 5 INVENTOR.

DONALD G. SMITH Agent July 19, 1966 D. G. SMITH STRUCTURAL JOINT FOR A CARGO CONTAINER Filed April 18. less 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. DONALD G. SMITH Agent July 19, 1966 D. G. SMITH 3,261,493

STRUCTURAL JOINT FOR A CARGO CONTAINER Filed April 18, 1963 s Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG- IO 35 am 35a 34 INVENTOR. DONALD 6. SMITH United States Patent 3,251,493 STRUCTURAL JGINT F012 A CARGG CGNTAINER Donald G. Smith, Marietta, Ga, assignor to Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, Burbank, Calif. Filed Apr. 18, 1963, Ser. No. 273,985 3 (Ilaims. (Cl. 217-65) This invention relates to a knockdown container, and more particularly to a rigid knockdown container wherein the side walls are capable of being locked together in fluid tight sealing engagement in their assembled relation.

In the transportation of cargo, it is desirable to provide a rugged, re-useable cargo container forming a complete enclosure which may be easily assembled and disassembled after use for storage and transport to a place of re-use with a minimum of lost space. Such container should further be capable of being opened from any side, being made watertight, and include provisions for transferring load forces between the panels. Also, to minimize manufacturing costs, a plurality of sizes of containers should be capable of being built up from standard panels of simple construction. This invention provides a container meeting these criteria.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a knockdown container capable of providing a complete enclosure by a plurality of container panels assembled together by locking angles.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a knockdown container capable of providing a complete watertight enclosure by a plurality of panels assembled together in sealing relation by locking angles.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container constructed of container panels having extruded metal mitered edgings around their peripheral edges.

A further object of this invention is to provide a container wherein the container panels each have an edging around their peripheral edges and have resilient seals retained therein which, upon assembly of the panels, engage the seal of an adjacent panel and seal the edges of the container.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an extruded container edging having a mitered side surface, a continuous gasket extending from the side surface, and spaced-apart flanges for permitting connection of the edging to a container panel peripheral edge.

Yet a further object of this invention is to provide a container wherein the container panels have mitered interior edges provided with bearing surfaces therealong for transmitting load forces between the panels.

Another object of this invention is to provide a slide-on connecting angle capable of locking together all perpen-dicularly related panels of the enclosing container.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a slide-on locking angle for locking together two panels in end-to-end relation.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become more apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one assembled container embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the interior side of a panel for the container of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional View taken along line 33 of FIGURE 1 showing in detail the connection of two mating panels of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary perspective view looking from the outside at a corner of two connected panels for the FIGURE 1 container;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the inner surfaces of the connected panels shown in FIG- URE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary pictorial view of an alternate exterior corner construction embodiment for the FIGURE 1 container panels permitting installation of the locking angles;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of two containers, exclusive of end panels, connected together by connector angles to form a double length container;

FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 88 of FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 9 is a cross-sectional view of an alternate corner mitered edging embodiment for the FIGURE 1 container; and

FIGURE 10 is a cross-sectional view of a further alternate mitered edging embodiment for the FIGURE 1 container.

Generally stated, this invention comprises a rigid enclosing container formed of panels having mitered side edges which fit together with the mating mitered edges held in snug mating engagement by locking angles. To make the container watertight, seals are provided along the mitered mating surfaces. In one form of the invention, provisions are made for transmitting load forces directly between the panels. Also, to permit increasing of the length of the container, a connecting angle is provided for locking at least two panels in end-to-end relation.

More specifically, there is shown in FIGURE 1 a container 4 comprising six panels 5 which are secured together along their side edges by corner angles 6.

The body So of each panel 5, best seen in FIGURE 2, is formed of a single sheet of plyboard or other suitable container material and has edgings 8, Which may be formed of extruded aluminum for example, secured to its peripheral edges. Edgings 8 are mitered at an angle of 45 degrees along the surface 8a, on the interior side of panel 5, and are mitered in a like manner at their junctures 3b so that they fit together to form a continuous mitered edging about the periphery of the panel.

The edgings 8, best seen in FIGURES 3, 4 and 5, of each panel have a planar surface 9 normal to the surface 8a and a tongue or protuberance 10 extending outwardly from surface 9, which is provided with an undercut channel or groove 10a. Substantially centrally of its width, surface 311 is provided with a concave groove 11 and retains therein a continuous one-piece resilient preferably cylindrical gasket or seal 12. Approximately one-third f the perimeter surface area of seal 12 extends from the groove while in excess of one-half, and preferably approximately two-thirds, of the seal 12 is confined within the groove 11 to prevent the seal from falling out when the panels are separated. Edgings 8 include spaced-apart flanges 13 which project from the main body portion of the edging and define a groove 14 for receipt of the terminal end wall 55 of the panel body 5a. The terminal end wall 5b is secured within the groove 14, such as by gluing along the confronting surfaces of the panel body and flanges 13, or by any other appropriate means or manner. With each panel 5 provided with edgings 8 about its periphery, which edgings are mitered at an angle of 45 degrees on the interior side of the panel, the six panels 5 are readily assembled together such that the seal 12 of one panel is in sealing engagement with the seal 12 of an adjacent panel 5, as best seen in FIG- URES 4 and 5.

For locking the panels 5 together in their assembled position to form the container 4, the before-mentioned locking angles 6 are provided. Each locking angle 6 is triangular in cross-section and has an undercut channel or groove 6a formed centrally of its base 612 so as to provide opposed tongues 6c at the juncture of the opposite sides of groove 6a and base 6b which slide into mating and locking engagement with the grooves 10a formed in tongues 10 of the edgings 8. It will be appreciated that upon sliding the locking angle 6 into place, adjacent confronting edgings 8 are drawn together and accordingly any seals 12 contained in grooves 11 will be resiliently deformed against one another so as to provide a fluidtight seal. It will of course be further appreciated that the seals 12, being resilient, maintain the grooves 10a of the edgings 8 biased into frictional engagement with the tongues 60 of the locking angle 6 to retain the locking angle in place.

As best seen in FIGURE 4, the exterior tip ends of the edgings 8 are mitered so as to provide a surface 80 having a relationship of substantially 45 degrees relative to the plane of each of the three sides forming a container corner. The tip ends of the edgings 8 are cut off to give free access to the grooves 10a in the tongues 10 of the mating edgings 8 by the tongues 6c of a locking angle 6, but not far enough to intersect the grooves 11 which retain seals 12 so as to maintain the seal of the container at the corners. The cutting off of the exterior tip ends of the panel edgings 8, it will be appreciated, is necessary to prevent the confronting tongues 10 of one pair of mating edgings 8 from interfering with and preventing the locking engagement of locking angle 6 with the pair of mating tongues of the perpendicularly related edgings 8 at the corner of the container. The third panel which matingly fits with the two panels shown in FIGURES 4 and to form a container corner is not shown; however, it will be understood that the tip end of its edging is mitered to form a surface which is an extension of the surface 80 when the three panels are fitted together.

An alternate approach to making provisions for sliding on the locking angle 6 is shown in FIGURE 6. As shown therein, the tongues of edgings 8 are each provided with transverse slots 100 in alignment with the perpendicularly related groove 10a of an adjacent edging. It will be seen that this construction permits the passage of the locking angle 6 through the transverse slot 160 and into engagement with the grooves 10a whereby the container panels may be locked together by the slide-on locking angle 6. It will of course be appreciated that if a locking mechanism of the clamp type were used, for example, no cutting of the container corners would be needed.

In some applications it may be desirable to extend the length, or width, of the container 4, and toward this end there is shown in FIGURE 7 a container 18 comprising two containers 4, each exclusive of one end panel, connected together at their open ends in end-to-end relation by the connecting angles 19. A slide-on connecting angle 19, shown in detail in FIGURE 8, is provided for interconnecting two confronting panels 5 of the containers 4 in end-to-end relation. Each connecting angle 19 is X- shaped and has a top portion 20 and two legs 21 extending or projecting outwardly from the center of the top portion 20 so as to form 45-degree angles with the free ends of the top portion. The terminal ends 20a of the top portion 20 are tapered along .a plane normal to the adjacent leg 21 and are provided with grooves 2% on their under sides which form tongues or protuberances of the terminal ends 20a.

It will be seen therefore that the tongues 20a and grooves 20b of the angle 19 interfit with the grooves 10a and tongues 10 of an adjacent edging 8 to maintain the exterior surfaces 21a of the angle 19 in snug engagement with the surface 8a of the adjacent fitting 8 to lock the panels 5 together in end-to-end relation. The seals 12, being in biasing engagement with the exterior surfaces 21a of the legs 21, provide a watertight seal and also take up any slack in the connection.

It will be appreciated that to form a container of double panel length, the panels 5 must be secured together in end-to-end relation by the connecting angles 19 before the panels are connected together to close the container 18. Also, although the connecting angles 19 sealingly interconnect the panels along their center portion, they do not provide a seal at the corners. Accordingly, to seal the corners, a suitable insert and/or sealing compound should be provided at these corners if a completely fluid-tight container is desired,

Referring now to FIGURE 9, there is shown an alternate form of the mitered edging of FIGURES 1 to 6. The corner 30 shown in FIGURE 9 comprises a pair of complementary edgings 31 and 32 which have resilient seals 33 and 34 fitted in grooves formed in their mating mitered surfaces 31a and 32a. The edgings 31 and 32 also include tongues or protuberances 35 and 36 provided with grooves 35a and 36a for mating engagement with the tongues 6a of a locking angle 6 and flanges 37 and 38 extending from the edging bodies for connection of the edgings to panels 5. It will be seen that the edgings 31 and 32 are identical to edgings 8 with one exception; namely, the provision of a rectangular inset or seat 31b in surface 31a of edging 31 and a complementary mating rectangular perpendicularly related step 32b in surface 32a of edging 32. This step and seat construction provides for the transmission of load forces directly between the panels 5 removing some of the strain from the locking angle 6. The step and seat arrangement thus provided prevents any tendency of one panel to slide relative to its adjoining panel although such relative movement is eifectively precluded by the locking angle 6. The complementary edgings 31 and 32, it will be seen, can provide a watertight seal and may be used in any application where the edgings 8 may be used, when confronting container panels are provided therewith.

There is shown in FIGURE 10 a corner 40 which, be-

ing identical to corner 30 with one exception, will only.

be described in detail as to how it differs from corner 30. Also, the major features of corner 40 will be given the prime reference numerals corresponding to the identical features of corner 30 and reference should be made to the description of corner 30 for a detailed description of such features. The corner 40 differs from corner 30 only in that the surface 31a is provided with a tongue 41a and a groove 41b for cooperating engagement with a perpendicularly related groove 42a and tongue 42b formed in surface 32'a rather than a step and seat arrangement. The tongue and groove arrangement provides a positive interengagement between the adjacent edgings and transmits load forces between the panels 5.

It can be seen from the foregoing that this invention provides a knockdown cargo container capable of providing complete enclosure formed of container panels having interfitting mitered edgings, which panels are locked together preferably by slide-on locking angles. In one form of the invention the mitered edgings of each panel are identical, and thus all panels are interchangeable; while in alternate forms of the invention, complementary mitered edgings are provided with perpendicularly related bearing surfaces for direct transmission of load forces between the panels. The mitered surfaces of the edgings can mount continuous resilient seals which upon assembly of the panels are in sealing engagement with the seals of an adjacent panel, thereby making the container watertight. Also, the invention provides a connecting angle for connecting tw-o containers, each exclusive of one end panel, together in end-to-end relation to form a container of increased size.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the invention, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications and equivalents as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A structural joint for connecting panels in angular relation comprising in combination:

a pair of adjacent edgings having confronting edge mitered mating surfaces;

a first groove formed in each of said edges, said first groove located in and extending longitudinally the length of said mitered surface;

a resilient seal mounted in the first groove of each panel and extending the distance of said first groove, a portion of said seal extending out of said first groove and above the mitered surface;

the cross-sectional shapes and area relationships of said first groove and said seal are interrelated for retention of said seal in said first groove against free removal;

a second groove formed in each of said edges, said second groove located in .the edging side opposite the mitered surface and extending the length of said mitered surface;

said edgings assembled together with said mitered surfaces of adjacent .panels in mating juxtaposition;

and, a lock means slidably mounted over the assembled edgings, said lock means slidably engageable in both said second grooves for locking the panels together with said seals in the first grooves in cooperating contact to effect a fluid-tight seal.

2. A structural joint for connecting panels in angular relation comprising in combination:

a pair of adjacent edgings having confronting edge mitered mating surfaces;

a first groove formed in each of said edges, said first groove located in and extending longitudinally the length o-f said mitered surface;

a resilient seal mounted in the first groove of each panel and extending the distance of said first groove, a portion of said seal extending out of said first groove and above the mitered surface;

a seat in one of said mitered mating surfaces;

a perpendicularly related step in the other of said mitered mating surfaces complementary to said seat;

a second groove formed in each of said edges, said second groove located in the edging side opposite the mitered surface and extending the length of said mitered surface;

said edgings assembled together with said mitered surfaces of adjacent panels in mating juxtaposition with said step interfit-ting said seat;

and, a lock means slidably mounted over the assembled edgings, said lock means slidably engageable in both said second grooves for locking the panels together Wit-h said seals in the first grooves in cooperating contact to effect a fluid-tight seal.

3. A structural joint for connecting panels in angular relation comprising in combination:

a pair of adjacent edgings having confronting edge mitered mating surfaces;

a first groove formed in each of said edges, said first groove located in and extending longitudinally the length of said mitered surface;

a resilient seal mounted in the first groove of each panel and extending the distance of said first groove, a portion of said seal extending out of said first groove and above the mitered surface;

a tongue and groove in one of said mitered mating surfaces;

a perpendicularly related groove and tongue in the other of said mitered mating surfaces complementary to said tongue and groove in said one of said mitered mating surfaces;

a second groove formed in each of said edges, said second groove located in the edging side opposite the mitered surface and extending the length of said mitered surface;

said edgings assembled together with said mitered surfaces of adjacent panels in mating juxtaposition and said tongue and groove of one mitered mating surface interfitting said groove and tongue of said other mitered mating surface;

and, a lock means slidably mounted over the assembled edgings, said lock means slidably engage-able in both said second grooves for locking the panels together with said seals in the first grooves in cooperating contact -to effect a fluid-tight seal.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 968,850 8/1910 Hunter 312-140 1,486,515 3/ 1924 Cuthertson 220- 1,824,900 9/ 1931 Kaufman 20-92 1,846,485 2/ 1932 Hart 312- 1,870,534 8/ 1932 Skoogh 312-140 2,023,260 12/1935 Beers et a1. 312-140 2,182,201 12/ 1939 Harris 220-80 2,476,501 7/ 1949 Manisoalco 217-65 2,485,644 10/1949 Norquist 217-12 2,551,775 5/1951 Von Canon 217-65 2,717,093 9/1955 Mautner 217-65 2,907,492 10/ 1949 Robertson 220-81 3,073,476 1/ 1963 Heacock 220-4 LOUIS G. MANCENE, Primary Examiner.

THERON E. CONDON, Examiner.

R. H. SCHWARTZ, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification217/65, 220/668, 220/684, 220/681, 52/282.1, 220/4.33
International ClassificationB65D6/00, B65D6/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65D9/12, B65D9/38, B65D9/34, B65D9/24
European ClassificationB65D9/34, B65D9/12, B65D9/24, B65D9/38