Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3262612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1966
Filing dateAug 20, 1964
Priority dateAug 20, 1964
Publication numberUS 3262612 A, US 3262612A, US-A-3262612, US3262612 A, US3262612A
InventorsTabor Carl J
Original AssigneeTabor Carl J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle closures
US 3262612 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 26, 1966 c. J. TABOR 3,262,612

REGEPIAGLE OLOSUBES Filed Aug. 20, 1964 a Shuts-Sheet 1 INVENTQR GARE J= TABGR ATTQRNEY July 26, 1966 c. J. TABOR RECEPTACLE CLOSURES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 20, 1964 FIG.4

FIG.5

FIG.7

INVENTOR CARL TABOR W ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,262,612 RECEPTACLE CLOSURES Carl J. Tabor, 9845 Reavis Road, Alfton, Mo. Filed Aug. 20, 1964. Ser. No. 390,966 10 Claims. (Cl. 222484) This invention relates in general to certain new and useful improvements in receptacle closures and, more particularly, to a closure having a pouring spout and being adapted for manual insertion into a can-top of the quickopening type.

Recently a receptacle has been developed which has a top provided with a quickly and readily removable element. Such receptacles, in the form of a cylindrical metal can, are currently being used for beer, soft drinks, and a wide variety of other liquids, and are usually referred to as pop-top or tab-opened cans. These cans have a section of the top enclosed in a continuous somewhat annular line of weakness and the enclosed section is provided with a riveted or spot-welded tab that can be grasped manually and, when pulled, will exert a proper amount of leverage on the section so that it is broken away from the remainder of the top or popped out, so to speak, leaving a relatively large somewhat elongated opening. Although the shape of these openings may vary somewhat, all such openings are elongated and are wider at one end than the other, having more or less the configuration of a triangle with rounded corners. Receptacles of this type have become very popular because of the ease of opening and are highly satisfactory when used for products that are entirely consumed immediately after the receptacle is opened. Thus far, however, it has been highly impractical and virtually impossible to use such receptacles or containers for liquids such as brake fluid, hydraulic transmission fluid, inks, syrups, and similar materials which are used in successive small quantities over an-extended period of time after the container has been opened, because, once opened, the container cannot be reclosed. Moreover, many of these liquids, being quite viscous, cannot be effectively poured from an opening which is wholly within the plane of the can-top.

It is the primary object of the present invention to provide a manually insertable accessory closure for quickopening containers and receptacles.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a closure of the type stated which has an integrally formed pouring spout.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a closure of the type stated which is compact and economical in cost.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a closure of the type stated which will stay securely in operative position as long as any contents remain in the container and can be manually removed whenever removal may be required.

In the accompanying drawings FIG. 1 is a fragmentary exploded perspective view of a container and a closure constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of a container with a closure partially in place to illustrate the manner of installation thereof;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a closure constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a top plan View of the closure;

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are fragmentary sectional views taken along lines 66 and 77, respectively, of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the closure.

Referring now in more detail and by reference char- 3,262,612 Patented July 26, 1966 ice acters to the drawings, which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the present invention, A designates a closure which is molded as a unitary one-piece structure from a semi-rigid,. somewhat resilient or rubber-like synthetic resin such as polyethylene, polypropylene or the like, and integrally includes a base 1 having an annular or continuous peripheral margin 2, the contour of which is geometrically similar to, but slightly larger than, the shape of the opening 0 in the top wall 2 of a container or can 0 for which such closure A is designed. It will, of course, be understood that different can manufacturers may vary the shape of the aperture 0 and obviously the shape of the base 1 must conform thereto.

The peripheral margin 2 is provided with a groove 3 which has a V-shaped cross-section along the major portion of the elongated sides and around the narrow end of the base 1, thereby forming an upper lip 4 and a lower lip 5. Around the broad end of the base 1, the groove 3 is also somewhat V-shaped, but the lower lip 5 is rounded off in the provision of an arcuate camming'surface 6, the outermost portion of which is located inwardly a short distance from the outermost edge of the upper lip 4. This camming surface 6 is faired smoothly into the sharper portions of the lower lip 5 in the regions of juncture as indicated at x.

Formed integrally upon, and extending upwardly from, the broad end of the base 1 is a tubular pouring spout 7 which opens at its lower end upon the under face of the base 1 and is also open at its upper end to provide a pouring mouth 8. The spout 7 may be of any selected diameter and height, but should have sufficient wall-thickness so as to be substantially rigid, strong and self-supporting. Similarly formed integrally upon, and extending upward y from, the narrow end of the base 1 is a small-diameter tubular vent-pipe 9 which opens at its lower end upon the under face of the base 1 and is also open at its upper end to provide an air induction aperture 10. The vent-pipe 9 is parallel to, and preferably of the same height as, the spout 7 and should also have sufiicient wall-thickness so as to be substantially self-supporting. The vent-pipe 9, however, need only be large enough in cross-sectional dimension and spaced laterally from the spout 7 by a suflicient distance so as to allow a free flow of air into the container 0 to prevent the formation of a partial vacuum within the container c during pouring.

Formed integrally upon the top face of the base 1 and projecting longitudinally outwardly therefrom above the level of the upper lip 4 is a narrow, elongated, relatively flexible ribbon 11 which is integrally provided at suitably spaced regions with upwardly opening shallow cap-forming elements 12, 13, sized to fit snugly, but removably, upon the upper ends of the spout 7 and vent-pipe 9, respectively, when the ribbon 11 is bent back upon itself, as best seen in FIG. 2. At its outer extremity, the ribbon 11 is provided with a tab 14 for manipulative convenience.

When a receptacle such as the container 0 has been opened by removal of a section of the top, thereby creating the aperture 0, the closure A may be flexed slightly along its longitudinal axis, as shown in FIG. 7, and the narrow end shoved down into, and along the aperture 0, so that the sharp-edged portion of the lower lip 5 will fit snugly against the under surface of the can-top t and the corresponding portion of the upper lip 4 will similarly fit down upon the upper surface of the can-top t. The closure A is pushed inwardly until the narrow end of the base 1 is firmly seated in the narrow end of the aperture 0 and then the broad end of the base 1 ispushed downwardly in a more or less vertical direction, forcing the camming surface 6 of the lower lip 5 across the edge of the aperture 0 and causing sufiicient deformation of the adjacent portions of the lower lip: 5, so that it will snap retentively into place. 'Ilhus, the entire edge of the 3 aperture 0 will be seated snugly within the bottom of the groove 3 and will be securely embraced between the upper lip 4 and lower lip 5 around its entire periphery so as to form a tight, closure-retentive, substantially leak-proof seal. It will, of course, be obvious that the cap-forming elements 1-2, 13, can be removed from, or returned to, capping position, as desired, by manually snapping them ofi or onto the upper ends of the spout 7 and vent-pipe 9, respectively.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement, and combination of the several parts of the receptacle closures may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A manually insertable closure adapted for cooperation with an aperture in a receptacle wall; said closure comprising a base lips integrally formed on said base and projecting outwardly to form the margin thereof, said lips having inwardly inclined substantially planar intersecting surfaces defining an inwardly indented lateral groove which is sized and shaped to snugly engage the marginal edge of the .aperture whereby to form a tight seal therewith, a portion of one of said lips being rounded in the provision of an arcuate camming surface, and an upstanding tubular pouring spout formed integrally with the base.

2. A manually insertable closure adapted for cooperation with an aperture in a receptacle wall; said closure comprising a substantially disk-like base continuous upper and lower lips integrally formed on said base and projecting outwardly to form the margin thereof, said lips having inwardly inclined substantially planar intersecting surfaces defining an inwardly indented lateral groove which is sized and shaped to snugly engage the marginal edge of the aperture whereby to form a tight seal therewith, a portion of said lower lip being rounded off in the provision of an arcuate camming surface, and an upstanding tubular pouring spout formed integrally with the base.

3. A manually insertable closure according to claim 2 and further characterized by an upstanding tubular vent means formed integrally with the base.

4. A manually insertable closure adapted for cooperation with an aperture in a receptacle wall said aperture being delineated by and including an elongated end portion which opens into a broad end portion; said closure comprising a base formed from a resilient material and having a thickness somewhat greater than the thickness of the receptacle wall, said base including an elongated end portion which is geometrically similar to but slightly larger than the elongated portion of said aperture and is integrally joined to a broad end portion which is geometirically similar to but slightly larger than the broad end portion of said aperture, continuous upper and lower lips integrally formed on said base and projecting outwardly to form the margin of said base, said lips having inwardly inclined surfaces which intersect in the formation of a peripheral groove, said groove being sized and shaped to snugly engage the margins of said aperture in such a manner that said upper and lower lips are presented respectively above and below the receptacle wall beyond the margins of the aperture, the portion of the lower lip projecting from the broad end of said base being rounded in the provision of an arcuate camming surface whereby said base can be inserted in said aperture by sliding the narrow end portion of the base into the narrow end portion of the aperture through the broad end portion of the aperture and when fully inserted pressing down on the broad end portion of the base thereby camming the arcuate camming surface over the margin of the broad end of the aperture until said groove engages the margin, and an upstanding tubular pouring spout formed integrally with the base.

5. A manually insertable closure adapted for cooperation with an elongated aperture which is enlarged at one end and is located in a receptacle wall; said closure comprising a base having a thickness greater than the thickness of the receptacle wall and sized to conform to the shape of the aperture, continuous upper and lower lips having inwardly inclined surfaces which intersect in the formation of an inwardly indented lateral groove sized and shaped to snugly engage the margins of said aperture so that said lips extend beyond the margins whereby to form a tight seal therewith, the portion of said lower lip in juxtaposition to the margin of the enlarged end of the aperture when the closure is operatively inserted being rounded in the provision of an arcuate camming surface so that the lower lip can be cammed into position upon insertion of the .closure, and an upstanding tubular pouring spout formed integrally with the base.

6. A manually insertable closure adapted for cooperation with an aperture in a receptacle wall, which aperture is elongated and is substantially broader in the transverse direction at one end than the other; said closure comprising a base which is formed from resilient material and is geometrically similar to but somewhat larger than the aperture in the receptacle wall, said base having a thickness somewhat greater than the thickness of said receptacle wall, upper and lower lips integrally formed on said base and projecting outwardly to form the margins thereof, said lips having inwardly inclined substantially planar intersecting surfaces which define a peripheral groove, said groove being sized and shaped to snugly engage the margins of said aperture whereby to form a tight seal therewith, the portion of the lower lip projecting outwardly from the broad end of said base being rounded in the provision of an arcuate camming surface whereby the narrow end of the closure can be fitted into the narrow end of the aperture through the broad end and the rounded portion of the lower lip can be cammed into position thereby firmly seating the closure in the aperture, and an upstanding tubular pouring spout formed integrally with the base.

7. A manually insertable closure adapted for cooperation with an aperture in a receptacle wall, which aperture is elongated and is substantially broader in the transverse direction at one end than the other; said closure comprising a base which is formed from resilient material and is geometrically similar to but somewhat larger than the aperture in the receptacle wall, said base having a thickness somewhat greater than the thickness of said receptacle wall, upper and lower lips integrally formed on said base and projecting outwardly to form the margins thereof, said lips having inwardly inclined substantially planar intersecting surfaces which define a peripheral groove, said groove being sized and shaped to snugly engage the margins of said aperture whereby to form a tight seal therewith, the portion of the lower lip projecting outwardly from the broad end of said base being rounded in the provision of anarcuate camming surface whereby the narrow end of the closure can be fitted into the narrow end of the aperture through the broad end and the rounded portion of the lower lip can be cammed into position thereby firmly seating the closure in the aperture, an upstanding tubular pouring spout formed integrally with the base, and an upstanding tubular vent means formed integrally with the base.

8. A manually insertable closure according to claim 7 and further characterized by closure means adapted to snugly engage said spout and vent for preventing the flow of fluid substances therethrough.

9. A manually insertable closure according to claim 7 and further characterized by cap-forming elements adapted for snug fitting engagement with said spout and vent for preventing the flow of fluid substances therethrough.

10. A manually insertable closure according to claim 5 6 6 in which the base is formed from a resilient synthetic 3,101,878 8/1963 Bee 222543 X resin material such as polyethylene. 1 3,140,019 7/1964 Barr 222556 X 3,160,327 12/1964 Porcelli 222543 X References Cited by the Examiner 3,204,829 9/1965 Song 222-484 X UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 FQREIGN PATENTS 2,361,958 11/ 1944 Nyden 16,303 of 1894 Great ,Britain. 2,777,616 1/1957 DeShazor 222-480 X 2,954,148 9/1960 Corrinet et a1. 222-548 X M. HENSON WOOD, JR., Primary Examiner. 3,016,168 1/1962 Larson 222-545 X 3 059 816 10/1962 G01 dstein 222 545 X 10 CHARLES R. CARTER, LOUIS I. DEMBO, Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2361958 *Aug 21, 1941Nov 7, 1944American Can CoContainer
US2777616 *Apr 18, 1955Jan 15, 1957Columbia Basin Plastics CompanShaker top
US2954148 *Apr 28, 1958Sep 27, 1960American Can CoDispensing container
US3016168 *Dec 29, 1958Jan 9, 1962Donald W LarsonShaker and pouring dispenser
US3059816 *Feb 19, 1957Oct 23, 1962Schenley Ind IncCombination container closure and pouring device
US3101878 *Feb 28, 1961Aug 27, 1963American Flange & MfgClosure assembly for containers and parts thereof
US3140019 *Feb 26, 1962Jul 7, 1964Nibot CorpDispenser top
US3160327 *Jan 23, 1961Dec 8, 1964Polymold Plastics IncDispensing spout with rupturable breathing diaphragm and closure therefor
US3204829 *Sep 6, 1963Sep 7, 1965Continental Can CoSelf-venting plastic nozzle and spout
GB189416303A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3372832 *Jun 17, 1966Mar 12, 1968Doris J. SmithRemovable cover for containers
US3596813 *Jun 21, 1968Aug 3, 1971Munn Elvin RPaint bucket lid with pouring spout
US4023728 *Jan 22, 1976May 17, 1977William GambergCoin slot for flip top can
US4057168 *Jul 7, 1975Nov 8, 1977Bosshold Barry LVented test tube top
US4576306 *Feb 7, 1985Mar 18, 1986Metal Box PlcClosure for a container having vent and tethered means
US4693410 *Dec 12, 1985Sep 15, 1987Surculus AgDrinking cup with closure for open bottles and/or cans
US4705186 *Nov 19, 1986Nov 10, 1987The Coca-Cola CompanyCan end assembly
US4893723 *Jun 28, 1988Jan 16, 1990Seabolt John KPaint can attachment
US4915252 *Mar 28, 1989Apr 10, 1990Schaffer Joel LBeverage can stopper
US5201140 *Dec 12, 1990Apr 13, 1993Voorhis Donald PRemote Christmas tree watering apparatus
US5791082 *Nov 13, 1996Aug 11, 1998Finello; KeithUniversal christmas tree water delivery system using gravity regulated flow
US6352166 *Feb 10, 2000Mar 5, 2002William Industries, Inc.Self-closing lid apparatus
US6644490Aug 6, 2001Nov 11, 2003Solo Cup CompanyLid
US6669048 *Mar 12, 2002Dec 30, 2003Basf CorporationNeck apparatus and closure system for a multi-compartment bottle
US6679397Aug 6, 2001Jan 20, 2004Solo Cup CompanyContainer lid with closure member
US6732875Aug 6, 2001May 11, 2004Solo Cup CompanyReclosable container lid
US6874649Jun 7, 2002Apr 5, 2005Solo Cup CompanyLid
US7021481 *Jun 1, 2001Apr 4, 2006The Coca-Cola CompanyContainer lid with multiple openings
US7051896 *Jan 23, 2002May 30, 2006William David SteadmanOpening assembly
US7063224Mar 15, 2005Jun 20, 2006Solo Cup Operating CorporationLid with drink opening
US7131551Apr 15, 2004Nov 7, 2006Solo Cup CompanyContainer lid with closure member
US7134566Aug 15, 2003Nov 14, 2006Solo Cup CompanyContainer lid with closure member
US7156251May 28, 2003Jan 2, 2007Solo Cup Operating CorporationReclosable container lid
US7159732Aug 21, 2003Jan 9, 2007Solo Cup Operating CorporationReclosable container lid
US7244161 *Jan 31, 2005Jul 17, 2007Arko Development LimitedNon-spill container
US7246715Jul 18, 2003Jul 24, 2007Solo Cup Operating CorporationReclosable container lid
US7513382 *May 31, 2006Apr 7, 2009Solo Cup Operating CorporationLid with drink opening
US7731047Sep 30, 2004Jun 8, 2010Solo Cup Operating CorporationReclosable container lid with sliding element
US7891517Jan 12, 2007Feb 22, 2011Samantha SimmonsApparatus for sealing a beverage can
US7918359May 10, 2007Apr 5, 2011Crown, Packaging Technology, Inc.Opening device
US7950542Mar 29, 2006May 31, 2011William David SteadmanRecessed opening assembly apparatus
US8240498Oct 31, 2006Aug 14, 2012Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Resealable closure
US8336725Aug 14, 2006Dec 25, 2012Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Sealing device for a container
US8336726Nov 7, 2008Dec 25, 2012Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Resealable beverage can end and methods relating to same
US8631957Jan 9, 2008Jan 21, 2014Dart Container CorporationRecloseable lid with closure plug
US8833585May 22, 2009Sep 16, 2014Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Resealable beverage can ends
CN101910010BNov 7, 2008Jan 2, 2013皇冠包装技术有限公司Resealable beverage can end and methods relating to same
EP0153068A2 *Feb 1, 1985Aug 28, 1985MB GROUP plcClosure for a container
WO2009062004A1 *Nov 7, 2008May 14, 2009Crown Packaging Technology IncResealable beverage can end and methods relating to same
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/484, 222/543, 222/570, 222/545, 220/801, 220/254.3, 220/254.2
International ClassificationB65D47/14, B65D51/00, B67B7/00, B65D47/12, B67B7/48
Cooperative ClassificationB65D51/007, B65D47/14
European ClassificationB65D51/00F, B65D47/14