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Publication numberUS3263362 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1966
Filing dateAug 30, 1963
Priority dateAug 30, 1963
Publication numberUS 3263362 A, US 3263362A, US-A-3263362, US3263362 A, US3263362A
InventorsLa Falce Palmerino C
Original AssigneeLa Falce Palmerino C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotatable top and spinner
US 3263362 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug- 2, 1966 P. c. LA FALCE 3,263,362

ROTATABLE TOP AND SPINNER Filed Aug. 30, 1963 INVENTOR. PALMERINO C. LA FALCE United States Patent 3,263,362 RUTATAELE TOP AND SPINNER Palmer-inn tC. La False, Buffalo, NY. Filed Aug. 30, 1963, Ser. No. 305,736

ll Claims. (Cl. id-67) This invention relates to a new game set. More particularly, the invention relates to a game that can be played by a single player or by a group of players, and that is a departure from most of the familiar games, to provide a refreshing, interesting, and entertaining change for the players.

One object of the present invention is to provide a new, challenging, and interesting kind of game.

Another object of the invention is to provide a game that can be enjoyed even by a novice with relatively little skill, yet that permits a relatively great development of skill from the novice stage to that of the expert, so that the game is also very enjoyable for highly skilled, experienced players.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new kind of toy that is well suited to the needs of younger children, and that is sufficiently interesting to attract them to its use and that will hold their interest.

A related object of the invention i to provide a new kind of toy for use by children as well as adults, that will promote the development of muscular coordination in an interesting and amusing way.

A further object of the invention is to provide a game that can be played by a single player or by a group of players, and that provides a mild form of exercise for each player, while also requiring some skill and muscular coordination.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new kind of game that provides amusement and recreation for young and old alike.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims. To these and other ends, the invention resides in certain improvements and combinations of parts, all as will hereinafter be more fully described, the novel features of the invention being pointed out in the claims at the end of this specification.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary part section, part side elevation, showing the lower end of the game stick with the head of the game stick in position adjacent a rotary toy, as if about to strike the toy to rotate it;

FIG. 2 is a section taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevation taken on the line 3-3 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 is a section taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, and

FIG. 5 is a similar section to that shown in FIG. 4, but taken through the head of the game stick that is constructed in accordance with a modified embodiment of this invention.

The drawings show preferred embodiments of this invention for the purpose of illustrating it so that it can be understood. Since this is a new kind of game, the things that are used in the game must be clearly identified. The rotary toy is referred to hereafter as the buck, and the stick that is used to strike the buck is referred to either simply as the stick or as the buck stick. These two parts together form a game set, and can be used by a single player. However, a single player may develop sufficient skill to be able to use a number of bucks with a single stick, or a group of players may wish to use several sticks, one per player, together with one or more bucks. Some of the ways in which the game can be enjoyed will be referred to after the individual parts themselves have been described.

Referring now in detail to the drawings by numerals of reference, the numeral 16 denotes the buck generally. It comprises a generally cylindrical body 11 that has an upper end and a lower end, and that is formed at its lower end with a broad, generally semi-spherical curved surface 12 on which the buck is supported in a generally upright position as it rotates. The buck body 11 preferably is made from aluminum or some other easily machined, light weight metal. It is formed with a solid core 14 at its lower end, that may be integral with a relatively .thin but sturdy generally tubular shank or wall 15, that extends upwardly from the solid lower end. A hard steel peg 16 is inserted in the lower end of the buck, and is formed to conform to the curved surface of the buck at its lower end, to provide a relatively hard insert for resisting wear.

The buck is formed at its upper end with an enlarged diameter head 18 that is substantially symmetrical about the axis of rotation of the buck. The external surfaces of the cylindrical shank 15 and of the head 18 are made irregular by substantially vertical knurl lines 29 and 21 respectively. A plastic or metal cap 22 is mounted across the upper end of the head 18, to close it off.

The stick is indicated generally by the numeral 25. It comprises a long rod 26 of wood or other suitable material. A striking head is mounted. on the lower end of the rod 26 and is formed from a rigid metal backing member 23 that is secured in place on the stick by a strap 39 or by some other convenient fastening means. The backing member 28 is generally channel-shaped, as is best shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, and it, as well as the other parts of the head, is preferably formed with a compound curvature such as is shown in the drawings, so that it is generally concave in the direction of the axis of the rod, and is also generally concave in a direction toward the upper end of the rod. In other words, in planes parallel to the plane in which the section of FIG. 2 was taken, the head is formed with a center of curvature that is located far on the other side of the rod from that on which the head itself is mounted; and in planes perpendicular to the plane on which the section of FIG. 2 was taken, and parallel to the plane in which the section of FIG. 3 was taken, the head is curved about a center of curvature that is located far above the head. Preferably, this last center of curvature may be located so that it is approximately located where the natural pivot point of the stick would be during use by an average player; that is, at the elbow or shoulder level of the player, or between these two points.

A foam rubber or plastic pad 32 is secured to the face of the backing member 28, and may be clinched between its opposite arms, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4. A facing strip 34, of a soft, rubber-like material, is secured over the outer face of the foam rubber pad 32. This strip 34 is formed with an irregular surface that comprises a plurality of outwardly projecting, soft, flexible and resilient fingers 35.

In the modified embodiment of the invent-ion that is illustrated in FIG. 5, the head consists only of the backing member 28 and the foam rubber pad 32', which is used itself for contact with the buck, Without a protective facing. However, a facing may be used and preferably has an irregular surface. Instead of the kind of facing that is shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, however, other types of rough surfaced facing may be used such as, for example, sandpaper, abrasive coated cloth, and the like.

A single player uses the buck and the buck stick in the following way. The buck is placed on the ground, pavement, or in a building, on the floor. The player grasps the upper end of the stick and strikes the knurl- 2 ing 20, on the cylindrical shank 15 of the buck, with the face part of the head of the stick. To do this, the stick is held with the head facing toward the buck and the ground or floor. With a little practice, one stroke with the stick will be sufficient to make the buck rotate at a sutficiently high speed so that it becomes self-supporting, and assumes the position in which it is shown in FIG. 1. The stick is then rotated through 180 in the hands of the player, so that the head faces in the opposite direction, away from the player and toward the buck. The stick is then used repeatedly, by striking the face of the stick head against the knurling 20 on the shank 15 of the buck, to cause the buck to continue to rotate and to retain its upright position.

Very little skill is required to make the buck rotate sufficiently to be self supporting, because of the large size of its curved lower surface 12, and also because it is constructed so that its center of gravity preferably is located on its axis of rotation and in close proximity to the center of curvature of its lower surface 12. As a player becomes more skillful in keeping the buck rotating for longer and longer periods, it can be caused to execute more complicated maneuvers by proper manipulation of the stick. For example, it can be caused to travel in particular directions, or even to execute complicated maneuvers, by proper manipulation of the stick and the way in which it is brought to bear against the buck.

Two players, each having a stick, can .play several different types of games with a single buck. For example, one simple game is analogous to the game of catch with a baseball, where the buck is passed repeatedly back and forth between the two players. This simple game develops skill in causing the buck to move as it is rotated.

When two players each have a stick and a buck, exciting contests are easily arranged between the players, to see which player can keep his buck longest in rotation, or which player is the more skillful in causing his buck to execute preselected maneuvers.

For a large group of players, games similar to polo and hockey are challenging and amusing. Such games require a high degree of skill among all of the participants, yet even young children should be capable of playing.

While it is preferred that the buck be constructed in the manner shown, with the diameter of its curved lower surface 12 substantially the same as the diameter of its cylindrical shank 15, the diameter of the curved lower surface may be either smaller or larger than the diameter of the shank. However, for proper support during rotation of the buck, and for a more pleasing appearance and greater sturdiness, it is preferred that the buck be constructed with its lower surface at least as large as is shown in FIG. 1, and if it is constructed to have a smaller diameter than that of the cylindrical shank, it is preferred that the diameter of the curved lower surface be no less than one-half of the diameter of the shank, to facilitate balance and the other desirable characteristics already mentioned. For lightness and greatest durability, it is preferred that the buck be made of aluminum, or some similar light metal. However, it may also be fashioned from wood, synthetic plastic material, and the like.

The construction of the stick may also be changed. For example, the manner in which the backing member is secured to the rod can differ from that shown.

While the invention has been disclosed herein by reference to the details of preferred embodiments thereof, it is to be understood that such disclosure is intended in an illustrative rather than in a limiting sense, and it is contemplated that various modifications in the construction and arrangement of the parts will readily occur to those skilled in the art, within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A game set comprising a rotary toy that has a generally cylindrical body that has an upper end and a lower end, and that is formed at its lower end with a broad,

1 generally semi-spherical curved surface for supporting said toy in a generally upright position during rotation thereof, the diameter of the curved surface being sufficiently large to permit stable support of the toy thereon at relatively low rates of rotation, said toy being solid at its lower end and hollow at its upper end to locate the center of gravity thereof low in the body of the toy and close to the center of curvature of said curved surface, and a stick for striking the toy to rotate it, said stick comprising an elongate rod and a head that is mounted near one end of the rod to extend transversely thereof, said head comprising an elongate backing member and a resilient pad that is mounted on said backing member remote from said rod, whereby the stick can be grasped at the end of the rod remote from said head for swinging the stick at said toy.

2. A toy in accordance with claim 1 wherein the body of said toy is formed with an inserted steel peg that projects generally axially of the toy upwardly from its curved lower surface, and wherein the lower surface of the peg conforms with and forms a part of the generally semispherical curved lower surface of the toy.

3. A toy in accordance with claim 1 wherein the body of the toy is formed primarily from aluminum.

4. A toy in accordance with claim 1 wherein the generally cylindrical body of the toy is roughened with substantially vertical knurling lines.

5. A game set in accordance with claim 1 wherein said head is curved about a center of curvature that is located on the other side of the rod from said head.

6. A game set in accordance with claim 1 wherein said head is curved about a center of curvature that is located axially of the rod from the end on which the head is mounted.

7. A game set in accordance with claim 1 wherein said head extends transversely of the rod on both sides of the rod, in generally symmetrical fashion relative to the rod.

8. A game set in accordance with claim 1 wherein said rotary toy has its generally semi-spherical curved lower surface formed with substantially the same diameter as the diameter of its generally cylindrical body, and wherein said toy is formed with an enlarged diameter, hollow head that is substantially cylindrical about the axis of rotation of said toy.

9. A game set in accordance with claim 8 wherein said game stick includes a member having an irregular surface that is mounted on a facing on said pad for engagement with the toy.

10. A game set in accordance with claim 9 wherein said member is formed from a soft, yielding, rubber-like material and the irregular surface thereof comprises a plurality of projecting fingers that are disposed in a pattern in spaced relation to each other.

11. A game set comprising a rotary toy and a game stick for striking the toy to rotate it, said toy having a generally cylindrical body that has an upper end and a lower end, and that is formed at its lower end with a broad, generally semi-spherical curved surface for supporting said toy in a generally upright position during rotation thereof, the diameter of the curved surface be-,

ing substantially the same as the diameter of said generally cylindrical body to permit stable support of the toy thereon at relatively low rates of rotation, said toy being solid at its lower end and hollow at its upper end to locate the center of gravity low in the body of the toy and close to the center of curvature of said curved surface, said toy being formed with an enlarged diameter, hollow head at its upper end that is generally symmetrical about the axis of rotation of said toy, the external up right surfaces of said toy being knurled, and said game stick comprising an elongate rod and a head that is mounted at one end of the rod to extend laterally thereof in both directions therefrom, said head comprising an elongate backing member and a resilient, cellular rubber-like pad that is mounted on said backing member remote from said rod, said head being curved in compound fashion to be generally concave toward the length of the rod and to be generally concave toward the end of the rod that is remote from the end on which the head is mounted, whereby the game stickmay be g-rasped at the end thereof remote from the rod for swinging the game stick at the toy, to engage the head of the game stick against a knurled surface of the toy to rotate the toy.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 615,930 12/1898 Warren 46-69 755,446 3/1904 Butcher 46-67 X Grattan 46-67 Harrington 46-70 Pearson 273-58 Tintore 46-64 Houlihan 46-64 Palmoero 46-67 Roseen a, 46-67 Lancaster 46-67 Examiners.

R. F. CUTTING, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US615930 *Apr 14, 1898Dec 13, 1898 Top-spinner
US755446 *Feb 12, 1903Mar 22, 1904World S Fair Novelty CompanySpinning-top.
US808918 *Apr 1, 1905Jan 2, 1906John W GrattanTop.
US1366535 *Jan 2, 1920Jan 25, 1921Harrington Eugene BTop-spinner
US1779187 *Apr 1, 1929Oct 21, 1930Pearson Henry CPush ball
US2112182 *Mar 22, 1937Mar 22, 1938Tintore Ignacio MSpinning top
US2282314 *Nov 20, 1940May 12, 1942James Houlihan WilliamSpinning top
US2309475 *Jun 25, 1942Jan 26, 1943John PalmieriSpinning ball toy
US2464994 *Dec 29, 1945Mar 22, 1949Roseen Joseph FTop
US3044212 *Nov 24, 1958Jul 17, 1962Lancaster John TWhipping top
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5024625 *Aug 9, 1988Jun 18, 1991Maccarthy PatrickTop and propelling element
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/259, D21/462, 473/569, 473/558
International ClassificationA63H1/00, A63H1/12
Cooperative ClassificationA63H1/12
European ClassificationA63H1/12