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Publication numberUS3263444 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1966
Filing dateJul 18, 1963
Priority dateJul 18, 1963
Publication numberUS 3263444 A, US 3263444A, US-A-3263444, US3263444 A, US3263444A
InventorsCroce Robert N Di
Original AssigneeCroce Robert N Di
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety finger ring having separable parts
US 3263444 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 2, 1966 R. N. Dl CROCE 3,263,444

I SAFETY FINGER RING HAVING SEPARABLE PARTS Filed July 18, 1953 FIG. I

INVENTOR. ROBERT N. Di CROCE ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,263,444 SAFETY FINGER RING HAVING SEPARABLE PARTS Robert N. Di Croce, 25 Spruce St., Brockton, Mass. Filed July 18, 1963, Ser. No. 296,067 4 Claims. Il. 63-15.7)

This invention relates to an improved finger ring, and more particularly to a finger ring of a plurality of circumferential segments readily separable from one another to release the ring from about the finger.

Known finger rings generally are of two styles; continuous unitary rings of a fixed size and adjustable rings having overlapping end portions adjustable relative to one another to vary the size of the ring. The unitary style of finger ring generally is preferred, especially for a high fashion ring, since with an adjustable ring the overlapping end portions tend to protrude from the body of the ring and scratch, tear or hook materials and other members. Also, the overlapping end portions ofan adjustable ring tend to separate from one another over a period of time, to enlarge the ring size and loosen the ring on the finger. Since these disadvantages are not present with a unitary ring, it generally is preferred. Unitary rings must be large enough to slip over the knuckle of a finger to the fleshy base of the finger, which often is smaller than the knuckle itself. Thus, a unitary ring large enough to slip over the knuckle will be too large for the base of the finger, and will readily rotate about the base of the finger. Also, there will be a space between the unitary ring and the base of the finger, which enhances the tendency of such unitary rings to catch on an obstruction such as a piece of machinery, a branch, or the like and yank the ring and finger into the path of the machinery, or with the branch, possibly severely injuring the finger and hand. Accordingly, while unitary rings commonly are preferred, there is an inherent danger present when these rings are worn.

An object of the present invention is to provide a safety finger ring having the appearance of a unitary ring, which if caught on an obstruction will readily separate from the finger. A further object is to provide a finger ring which is slightly adjustable in size so that it will both slip over the knuckle and grip the base of the finger. Another object is to provide a finger ring comprising a plurality of circumferential segments so attached to one another as to be readily separable to free the ring from the finger. These and other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following description of preferred embodiments of the finger ring.

In general, the finger ring of the present invention comprises a plurality of circumferential segments, the end portions of which abut, and means at the end portions of the segments to releasably attach the segments togeher. In the various embodiments of the invention set forth herein, the abutting end portions of the ring segments are releasably attached by resilient compressible members received in recesses in the ring segments by cooperating magnetized elements, by an adhesive, or by a combination of these means. Preferably the abutting end portions interlock with one another to prevent lateral movement of the segments relative to one another, and the means releasably attaching the abutting end portions permits a slight longitudinal movement of the segments relative to one another to allow the segments to separate somewhat and slightly enlarge the ring size while not releasing the segments from one another.

The invention will be further described in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational View of the finger ring;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a por tion of the finger ring showing one form of the means releasably attaching abutting end portions of the circumferential segments of the finger ring; and

FIGS. 3 and 4 are views similar to FIG. 2 of other forms of the means releasably attaching abutting end portions of the ring segments.

As shown in FIG. 1, the finger ring 1 of the invention comprises three releasably attached circumferential segments; a top circumferential segment 2, and two side circumferential segments 3 and 4. Commonly, such finger rings are made from a precious meta-l alloy, such as gold or silver. While three circumferential segments are illustrated, and are preferred, it is to be understood that two, or any greater number of segments may be employed.

The abutting end portions of the circumferential segments of the finger ring may be releasably attached to one another by a snap fastener arrangement 5 as shown in FIG. 2, or by an arrangement of magnets 6 as shown in FIG. 3, or by an adhesive 7 as shown in FIG. 4.

The snap fastener arrangement 5 includes a necked recess 11 formed in the end portion of one of the abutting segments, and a stud 12 with a compressible head 13 secured to the end portion of the other of the abutting segments with the head 13 projecting beyond the end of the segment. The head of the stud is received within the necked recess of the adjacent circumferential segment, and releasably attaches the circumferential segments together. Preferably the head of the stud also is resilient and somewhat elongated, as shown, so that the ends of adjacent segments may be separated slightly as shown in FIG. 2 without releasing the attachment of the segments to one another, the base of the head of the stud being compressed by the neck of the recess. A suitable resilient and compressible material from which the stud may be formed is polyethylene, which also has the advantage of low frictional resistance against the metal sides of the recess for ease in assembly and disassembly of the segments. However, other compressible materials, in cluding other polymers, may be employed.

A finger ring formed of such releasably attached circumferential segments appears as a continuous unitary ring, although if caught by a piece of machinery, a branch, or the like, the circumferential segments will readily separate from one another, the head projecting from the end portion of one segment slipping from the necked recess of the abutting segment. In this manner, the improved finger ring comprises a safety ring in that it includes segments which will readily separate from one another to release the ring from about the finger.

In normal use, the finger ring may he slipped over the knuckle of a finger to the smaller fleshy base of the finger. As the ring is passed over the knuckle, the segments will separate somewhat, each head 13 being compressed and partially slipping through its encompassing necked recess 11. After passing over the knuckle, each head will spring back into its recess, reducing the size of the ring, and the ring will fit snugly on the fleshy base of the finger to hold the ring in desired position. Alternatively, the segments may be assembled about the base of the finger itself. Because of this snug fit, the danger of the ring catching on an obstruction is minimized. However, if the ring should be so caught, the segments will readily separate as previously noted, freeing the ring from the finger.

In the magnet arrangement 6 for releasably attaching the circumferential segments as shown in FIG. 3, the end portions of each segment include a magnet pin 14. The pins of abutting ends of the segments are oppositely magnetized so that opposing poles of the magnet pin face outwardly, attracting one another, and by this magnetic attraction hold the segments together while permitting a slight separation and axial expansion of the ring segments. Preferably the head of each pin covers the end of each segment, thereby maximizing the magnetic force of attraction between abutting segments. The head surfaces of the magnets preferably are formed with complementary recesses and protrusions, as shown, to prevent the ends of the segments from slipping laterally relative to one another.

As shown in FIG. 4, the ends of adjacent segments may be secured to one another by an adhesive 7. Preferably the end surfaces of abutting segments have complementary corrugations, as shown, to increase the surface area of the adhesive attachment and to prevent lateral dis placement of the ends of the segments. An adhesive with some resiliency, such as a latex base adhesive, may be used to permit some axial expansion of the ring, or alternatively a solid adhesive, such as a polyvinyl acetate emulsion, may be used. While a solid adhesive will not permit separation of the segments and expansion of the ring without breaking the adhesive bond and releasing the segments, the adhesive easily may be reapplied by the wearer to reattach the segments and form a unitary ring.

Since the ring segments may be detached from one another, and reattached to one another, various top segments 2 may be utilized with a single set of side segments 3 and 4. For example, in a costume jewelry ring, various ornamental and jewel mounted top segments of a standard single size may be supplied for attachment to a single set of side segments 3 and 4 in the wearers size. The standardsize top segments will reduce the inventory expense of the rings. Since the wearer would only have to purchase a top segment once the side segments of his correct size had been purchased, his expense also will be reduced. Also, the assembled ring with the desired top segment will appear to be a more expensive unitary ring, and will have the safety and adjustability advantages described previously.

Thus, the finger ring of the present invention includes a plurality of circumferential segments, the end portions of which abut and are releasably attached to one another. Preferably the abutting end portions are both resilient and releasably attached to one another.

Since various modifications may be made in the details of construction of the finger ring, it is to be understood that the invention is defined solely by the scope of the following claims.

4 I claim: 1. A ring of such size as to be worn upon the finger comprising a plurality of rigid circumferential segments,

the end portions of the segments abutting one another the mutually abutting ones of said end portions being of uniform cross-section and forming a smooth continuous external surface in the assembled ring, the abutting end faces of the segments extending transversely thereof and having complementary interfitting corrugations, means connecting said segments in such a way that they are separable by pulling circumferentially of the ring, said means including mutually-adherent surfaces such that said segments are separable and re-connectable.

2. A finger ring as set forth in claim 1 in which said mutually-adherent surfaces are provided by a coating of an adhesive between said abutting ends and securing the segments to one another.

3. A finger ring as set forth in claim 1 in which the end portions of abutting segments comprise magnetic elements having opposite poles facing outwardly to magnetically attract one another.

4. A finger ring as set forth in claim 3 in which said magnetic elements are magnet pins; the head of each magnet pin substantially completely covering the end of the segment to which it is attached, the heads of abutting magnet pins including said corrugations for preventing lateral movement of the segments relative to one another.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 839,047 12/ 1906 Sylvester. 2,072,440 3/1937 Bauer et al 63-15] 2,146,272 2/1939 Skoog 6315.65 2,461,201 2/ 1949 Ellis 63-29 2,523,351 9/1950 Armstrong. 2,615,227 10/1952 Hornik 6329 2,983,975 5/1961 Hubbell. 3,127,757 4/1964 Weiss 63-157 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,138,464 1/1957 France.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

F. BARRY SHAY, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US839047 *Apr 19, 1906Dec 18, 1906Parks Brothers And RogersFastener.
US2072440 *Mar 26, 1936Mar 2, 1937John BauerRing
US2146272 *Apr 12, 1938Feb 7, 1939Skoog Joseph EAdjustable finger ring
US2461201 *Jul 4, 1945Feb 8, 1949Robert P EllisFlexible and/or elastic self-locking band
US2523351 *Feb 18, 1946Sep 26, 1950Gunnar O BedoarPlumb bob with magnetic point
US2615227 *Nov 18, 1949Oct 28, 1952Hornik FrederickMagnetic clasp coupling for jewelry
US2983975 *Jan 24, 1958May 16, 1961Hubbell Inc HarveyOverlay for buttons
US3127757 *Jun 28, 1960Apr 7, 1964Benjamin WeissFinger ring of arcuate members snapfitted together prior to soldering
FR1138464A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3335520 *Mar 30, 1965Aug 15, 1967Yeager Edward HMiniature automobile racing game utilizing adhesive connection
US3890800 *Oct 9, 1973Jun 24, 1975Montague Donald JSafety resilient slip coupling for pierced earrings
US4084692 *Feb 18, 1976Apr 18, 1978Ethicon, Inc.Dispenser for surgical threads
US4174620 *Jul 5, 1977Nov 20, 1979Russell David EJewelry with adhesive insert for lifting objects
US4417410 *Oct 23, 1981Nov 29, 1983John FreedomIndicia means for keys
US5311647 *Jun 21, 1993May 17, 1994Davida LevyJewelry closure having both magnetic and mechanical clasps
US5349725 *Nov 13, 1992Sep 27, 1994Davida Enterprises, Inc.Jewelry closure having a magnetic clasp with safety features
US5353608 *Jan 8, 1993Oct 11, 1994Dufonte Industries, LtdMulti-use jewelry piece
US5518056 *Aug 8, 1994May 21, 1996Newell Operating CompanySafety tassel for pull cords of window coverings
US5651273 *Oct 11, 1996Jul 29, 1997Davida Enterprises, Inc.Hinged finger ring
US5806346 *Feb 15, 1997Sep 15, 1998Schlinger; Robin E.Magnetic pendant necklace set and manufacture
US6112552 *Jan 12, 1999Sep 5, 2000Michael Anthony Jewelers, Inc.Gemstone setting and method of using
US6427486 *Jul 24, 2000Aug 6, 2002Benjamin B. YellenPinless articulated band
US7013674 *Apr 10, 2003Mar 21, 2006Steven KretchmerMagnetically attractable components for self-sizing jewelry articles
US7086218 *Aug 18, 2005Aug 8, 2006M & J - R & R Grosbard, Inc.Linked ring structures
US7216508 *Oct 7, 2005May 15, 2007Steven KretchmerMagnetically attractable components for jewelry articles
US7571623Apr 9, 2004Aug 11, 2009Claudia KretchmerMagnetically attractable components for self-sizing jewelry articles
US7735336Oct 13, 2005Jun 15, 2010Clara Belle Collections, LlcLocking mechanism for magnetic connector assembly used with an ornamental accessory
US20110186325 *Jun 4, 2010Aug 4, 2011Apple Inc.Cosmetic co-removal of material for electronic device surfaces
DE102007020416A1 *Apr 27, 2007Oct 30, 2008Stefan SchauzRing used as jewelry comprises a ring segment with a cutout in which an enclosed section of another corresponding ring segment lies to form the ring
WO1993021791A1 *May 4, 1993Nov 11, 1993Mitsugi IshidaA method of providing an article of jewelry of selected size and resulting article of jewelry
WO1994010871A1 *Nov 12, 1993May 26, 1994Davida LevyJewelry closure for a hinged ring
WO2004091334A2 *Apr 9, 2004Oct 28, 2004Steven KretchmerMagnetically attractable components for jewelry articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification63/15.7, 281/27.3, 428/900, 63/29.2, 24/303, 63/15.45
International ClassificationA44C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/90, A44C9/0038
European ClassificationA44C9/00C