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Publication numberUS3263807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1966
Filing dateMar 14, 1963
Priority dateMar 14, 1963
Publication numberUS 3263807 A, US 3263807A, US-A-3263807, US3263807 A, US3263807A
InventorsFingerhut Arthur L
Original AssigneeGen Foods Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 3263807 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 2, 1966 A. L. FINGERHUT PACKAGE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed Jan- 8. 1960 FIG. 1

Aug. 2, 1966 A. L. FINGERHUT 3,263,807

PACKAGE Qriginal Filed Jan. 8, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 2, 1966 A. L. IQ=INGEIRHUT PACKAGE 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Original Filed Jan. 8. 1960 "FIG. 6

Aug. 2, 1966 A. L. FINGERHUT 3,263,807

PACKAGE Original Filed Jan. 8,19% 4 Sheets-$heet 4 United States Patent 3,263,807 PACKAGE Arthur L. Fingerhut, Livingston, N.J., assignor to General Foods Corporation, White Plains, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Continuation of application Ser. No. 1,211, Jan. 8, 1960.

This application Mar. 14, 1963, Ser. No. 267,073 5 Claims. (Cl. 206-65) This application is a continuation of my prior application, Serial No. 1,211, filed January 8, 1960, and now abandoned.

This invention relates to a technique of packaging a plurality of smaller units. More specifically, it relates to a novel package which may be opened to permit marking of the contents while retaining suflicient strength to permit substantial handling in the opened state.

As is well known to those skilled-in-the-art, a large number of materials are handled in packages. Many of the materials which are commonly packaged may be marketed in the form of small packages. Although packaging of these materials in such small units permits ease of handling, especially at the retail level, it does present numerous problems which must be solved. Typical of these problems is the problem of providing appropriate shipping bundles or packages so that a reasonably large number of smaller units may b conveniently handled. Another problem which frequently faces the retailer in handling such packaged commodities is thefact that each of the individual containers must be marked, typically with a price i-ndicia. Although this may be done by the store clerk who removes the individual small cartons from the large container, this is a less than fully satisfactory operation. Aside from the inherent possibility of error, the clerk must perform several functions, each of which is mutually exclusive and which accordingly may occupy a disproportionate amount of time.

Accordingly those skilled-in-the-art have considered the problem of marking packages at a central location before they are moved along to the clerk within the store. This has only conveniently been done by opening the large, more-or-less standard shipping bundles and separately marking the individual containers. This I destroys the integrity of the package and, as the open bundle is passed along to the clerk in the store who is to place the packages on the shelf, there is a high probability of the small packages falling out of the bundle.

It is an object of this invention to provide a shipping bundle or package for containing a large number of small packages. It is another object of this invention to provide a bundle which may be readily opened and when open, retain its rigidity permitting it to be further handled and shipped. Other objects will be apparent to those Skilled? in-the-art on inspection of the following description.

In accordance with certain of its aspects, the shipping bundle of this invention comprises a plurality of packages to be marked arrayed in proximate touching relation to each other and pressing against each other with a normal force great enough to prevent slippage between the packages, and an overwrap securing said packages in said relationship to each other.

According to certain of its aspects, the bundle of this invention may include a sleeve of rectangular cross-section having a first side panel, a top panel, a second side panel, and a bottom panel. One of these panels will preferably be formed by joining together two sealing panels at the ends of a rectangular blank from which the bundle is formed, and it is preferred that this *be the bottom panel which may then be formed from a first sealing panel and a second sealing panel.

According to certain of its more specific embodiments, the bundle of this invention may be formed from a generally rectangular blank which may be separated into the following panel portions by parallel fold lines which extend across the width of the blank: a first sealing panel; a first side panel; a top panel; a second side panel; and a second sealing panel. When the blank is folded along the fold lines in a manner so that the first sealing panel overlaps the second sealing panel, it forms a sleeve having a rectangular cross-section.

In the preferred embodiment, each of the panels may have an end portion separated from the remainder of the panel by an end fold line, and preferably all the end fold lines on each end of the blank will lie in a common line. The first sealing panel may include a gussetting section defined by and enclosed within the fold line between the first sealing panel and the first side panel; a line extending obliquely, and preferably at a 45 angle from the intersection of the said fold line and the end fold line on the first sealing panel; and the edge of the first sealing panel.

The first and second side panels will preferably each have a length equal to the height of the packages to be contained within the bundle. Each end of the side panels will bear an end portion separated from the remainder of the panel by a fold line.

Preferably the end portions, and at least the end portions of the sealing panels, will be at least as wide as 50% of the length of the side panels to efifect the desiderata hereinafter noted.

When the term width is referred to in connection with the unfolded blank or any one of its component parts, it is intended to refer to a direction parallel to the main fold lines on the blank which separate the several panels from each other. The term length will be used to refer to a direction perpendicular to the width.

The top panel will preferably have a width sufficient to contain (in the assembled bundle) the desired number of packages in a row, and a length suflicient to contain the desired number of rows, which in the preferred embodiment may be three. At each of its four corners in the end portions thereof, the top panel will preferably contain a triangular gussetting section each defined and bounded by: the fold line between the top panel and an adjoining side panel; a gussetting line originating at the intersection of said fold line and the fold line between the end portion of said top panel and the remainder of the panel, and extended obliquely (preferably at a 45 angle) toward and terminating in an edge of the blank; and that portion of the edge of said blank between (a) the fold line be.- tween the top panel and the side panel, and (b) the intersection of the gusset line with the edge of the blank.

In the preferred embodiment, the top panel will bear two tear tapes extending across its width, each terminating at an edge. Preferably, the tear tapes will be spaced from each other by a distance equal to or about the length of two of the packages to be contained within the bundle. Where the bundle is adapted to include three rows of packages, the distance between the two tear tapes may be two-thirds of the length of the top panel, whereby when the area between the tear tapes is removed, the center row of packages and portions of each of the outer rows of packages will be exposed. In another embodiment, the top panel may bear one tear tape extending across its width and terminating at an edge. In either embodiment, the tear tapes will preferably be glued to the face of the panel which will be the inside of the finished assembly.

When the blank is folded to form a sleeve having a rectangular cross-section as hereinbefore noted, the ends may be closed by folding each end section of a side panel (along the end fold line) toward the end section on the other side panel; this folding will be simultaneous with a folding of the gussetting sections along their defining oblique bounding edges. The end portion of the bottom panel may then be folded over the so-folded end portions of the side panels; and the end portion of the top panel may then be folded down over the folded end portion of the bottom panel, the two being sealed together as by adhesive.

It is a particular feature of this invention that complete assembly of the bundle including the packages contained therein may readily be effected. Preferably, the rectangular blank may be laid flat on a surface. A plurality of rows, preferably three rows, of packages may be laid on the main portion (not including the end portion) of the top panel to completely cover and fall within the bounds of the panel. The first sealing panel and the second sealing panel are then wrapped around the contents and sealed to each other to form a bottom panel.

Prior to and during sealing the rows of packages are subjected to compression, preferably in directions parallel to the width and preferably also parallel to the length of the blank, which is suflicient to permit firm, rigid contact between the rows and between the packages in the rows and to very slightly deform the packages to a point not exceeding their elastic limit. Preferably the strain to which the packages are subjected may be, for example, 0.04 (i.e., inches per inch) and this may readily be effected by a pressure on the outer faces of the packages. The outward pressure of the boxes on the sealed carton will be less than the strength of the blank. This normal force creates a frictional force between the packages which is sufi'icient to prevent slippage between adjacent packages during shipping and handling.

The complete assembled bundle may readily be handled or shipped, because of the structure and its strength. Opening of the bundle in the two tape embodiment, to mark the packages therein, may be effected by grasping the end portion of the top panel between the slits at the end of the tear tapes; pulling firstly primarily away from the bundle proper, then primarily parallel to the face of the closed end to the top panel; then primarily parallel to the face of the top panel; and then primarily parallel to the face of the closed end away from the top panel.

This action will remove from the top of the bundle that portion of the top panel comprising a tear strip which is between the tear tapes and expose the packages in the bundle.

Opening of the single tear tape embodiment may be effected by grasping the end portion of the single tear tape; and pulling in manner similar to that described for the double tear tape embodiment. When the single tear tape has been removed, the portion of the top may be torn along the lines which join it to its end sections; and each portion may be folded back along the lines which join the top panel to the side panels.

The exposed packages may be readily marked as with price indicia. It is a feature of this invention'that because of the particular technique of packaging, including the prestressing of the packages in the bundle, the opened bundle retains sufficient rigidity and strength so that it may be readily and extensively handled without danger of the packages falling out of the bundle.

Specific embodiments of this invention are shown in the drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a blank from which one embodiment of the bundle of this invention may be made;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of an assembled bundle formed from the blank of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of a bundle of the embodiment of FIGURE 1 in course of assembly;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a portion of the bundle of FIGURE 3 at a period during assembly subsequent to FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the assembled bundle of the embodiment of FIGURE 1 which is in process of being opened;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of a bundle of the embodiment of FIGURE 1 which has been opened;

FIGURE 7 is a plan view of a blank from which a second embodiment of the bundle of this invention may be made;

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of a bundle of this invention formed from the blank of FIGURE 7.

In FIGURE 1, the blank 10, typically made of 141- pound (i.e., per 3000 square feet) kraft paper, includes a first sealing panel 11, a first side panel 12, a top panel 13, a second side panel 14, and a second sealing panel 15. In this embodiment, the panels 11 and 15 will together form a bottom panel. Each of panels 11 through 15 is separated from the others by fold lines 16 through 19. The blank 10 bears at each side thereof and running along its length, end fold lines 20 and 21 which define end portions generally designated as 22 through 26 and 27 through 31 on each end of the several panels 11 through 15. Each of panels 11, 13, and 15 bears at each end gussetting sections 32 through 35 and 36 through 39.

Panel 13 bears tear tapes 40 and 41 which terminate at the edges of the blank 10. At each end of the tear tapes 40 and 41, there are located slits 42 through 45. Preferably sealing panel 15 includes a glued section 46. End portions 24, 29 including gusset sections 33, 34 and 37, 38, respectively, will preferably have glued sections 47.

In the preferred embodiment, each tear tape 40, 41 will be of sufficient strength to tear through the kraft paper. Preferably it may include a piece of flat woven fibre, commonly cotton or linen. It may typically be flat and have a width of 7 C, In another embodiment, it may comprise a plurality of untwisted monofilaments of a nonwicking, strong, heat resistant plastic, typically Dacron having a low denier commonly 60-1000, preferably 220, say -145; having a low number of filaments, commonly 20-40, say 25-30, and having a twist which commonly approaches zero twists per inch. A typical tape which may be employed might be designated 28/ 0.

In the preferred embodiment, the tear tapes will be affixed to (as by gluing) and run along the under side of the top panel. Preferably each tear tape will terminate in an edge at a point immediately adjacent to and pref erably outside of, a triangular gussetting section. Preferably, there will be adjacent to at least one end of each tear tape a slit in the top panel.

The blank 10 may be formed into a bundle by placing thereon packages 48 to cover top panel 13. The side panels 12 and 14 may then be folded up as shown in FIG- URE 3, and first and second sealing panels 11 and 15 brought into contact. The side panels 12 and 14 may be subjected to sufiicient opposed forces, schematically designated 49 which forces the rows of packages 48 against each other, the force being sufficient to permit firm, rigid contact between the rows and to very slightly deform the packages to a point not exceeding their elastic limit. Typically this force may be suflicient to give a resulting strain of 0.012 inch per inch.

Sealing panels 11 and 15 are sealed as the force is applied to glued section 46. Then, as shown in FIGURE 4, end portions 23 and 28- of side panels 12 and end por-' tions 25 and 30 of side panel 14 are folded in. Sealing medium 47 may be applied if not heretofore present, and

the end portion of the bottom panel (formed from sealed end portions 22 and 26 of panels 11 and 15 on one end and correspondingly 27 and 31 of panels 11 and 15 on the other end) are folded down. End portions 24 and 29 are then folded over and sealed to seal the bundle as shown in FIGURE 2. The end panels may be sealed simultaneously with application of pressure of opposed forces schematically designated 50, thus to give a resulting strain of 0.004 inch per inch.

The bundle may be opened by grasping the edge of end portion 24 (or 29) at a point between the tear tapes 40 and 41 and tearing as shown in FIGURE 5, to ultimately provide the opened bundle of FIGURE 6. As is apparent, the faces of the packages 48 in the bundle are now exposed and may readily be price-marked if desired. The opened bundle of FIGURE 6 is strong and can be readily handled without danger of the packages falling out.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 7 and 8, the blank 60 typically made of l4l-pound (i.e., per 3000 square feet) kraft paper, includes a first sealing panel 61, a first side panel 62, a top panel 63, a second side panel 64, and a second sealing panel 65. In this embodiment, the panels 61 and 65 will together form a bottom panel. Each of panels 61 through 65 is separated from the others by fold lines 66 through 69. The blank 60 bears at each side thereof and running along its length, and fold lines 70 and 71 which define end portions generally designated as 72 through 76 and 77 through 81 on each end of the several panels 61 through 65. Each of panels 61, 63 and 65 bears at each end gussetting sections 82 through 85 and 86 through 89.

Panel 63 bears tear tape 90 which terminates at the edges of the blank 60. At each end of the tear tape 90, there are located slits 92 and 93. Preferably, sealing panel 65 includes a glued section 96; and portions 74, 79, including gussetting sections 83, 84 and 87, 88, respectively, will preferably include glued sections 97. The tear tapes, in this embodiment as in that of FIGURES 1-6, will extend beyond glued section 97 and will accordingly not be glued to the package when the end is sealed; this will allow easy access to the end flap and will facilitate opening of the package. It will be apparent that the tear tape may be made of other materials which will suitably tear through the kraft paper, e.g., linen, cotton, or another piece of strengthened kraft paper.

The blank 60 may be formed into a bundle by placing thereon packages 48 to cover top panel 63. The side panels 62 and 64 may then be folded in manner similar to that shown in FIGURE 3, and first and second sealing panels 61 and 65 brought into contact. The side panels 62 and 64 may be subjected to sufficient opposed forces, schematically designated 49 as in FIGURE 3, which forces the rows of packages 48 against each other, the force being sufficient to permit firm, rigid contact between the rows and to very slightly deform the packages to a point not exceeding their elastic limit. Typically this force may be sufiicient to give a resulting strain of 0.012 inch per inch.

Sealing panels 61 and 65 are sealed as the force is applied to glued section 96. Then, in manner similar to that shown in FIGURE 4, end portions 73 and 78 of side panels 62 and end portions 75 and 80 of side panel 64 are folded in. Sealing media 97 may be applied if not heretofore present, and the end portion of the bottom panel (formed from sealed end portions 72 and 76 of panels 61 and 65 on one end and correspondingly 77 and 81 of panels 61 and 65 on the other end) are folded down. End portions 74 and 79 are then folded over and sealed to seal the bundle in manner similar to that shown in FIGURE 2.

The bundle may be opened by grasping tear tape 90 at one end and tearing in manner similar to that shown in FIGURE 5. When the tear tape has been removed, the portions of the top panel may be ripped back to expose the faces of the packages therein. The bundle will retain its rigidity because of the particular construction.

Although this invention has been described in terms of specific embodiments, it will be apparent to those skilledin-the-art that various changes and modifications may be made which fall within the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A rectangular shipping bundle comprising a plurality of rectangular packages arrayed in proximate touching relation one to another and pressing against one another under forces acting along the width axis and length axis of said bundle to firmly compact said packages in the direction of each of said axes, a flexible overwrap having overlapped adhesively joined edges securing said packages in said relationship to one another and sealing the bundle at each end thereof to maintain said packages in said compacted condition under the stress of said forces, the reactive forces between said packages being of a magnitude suflicient for frictionally binding said packages one to another to preserve the integrity of the bundle and resist displacement of a package from said bundle in a direction perpendicular to the axes in which said forces are acting when the portion of said overwrap otherwise obstructing such displacement is removed, and removable tear strip means comprising a plurality of spaced apart tear tapes defining a portion of said overwrap exclusive of said overlapped edges and extending across one face of said overwrap for enabling removal of said portion of said overwrap to expose the faces of said packages lying in a plane parallel to the axes in which said forces are acting.

2. The invention according to claim 1 wherein said packages are contained within said bundle in a plurality of contiguous rows extending along the width of said bundle, said forces providing a compacting stress between the packages of a row and between packages of the respective rows, said tear strip means including a pair of individual tear tapes parallel to each other and spaced apart a distance sufficient to expose at least partially a face of all said packages in said bundle when the portion of said overwrap between said individual tear tapes is removed.

3. The invention according to claim 2 wherein said bundle consists of at least three of said rows of packages, said individual tear tapes being spaced apart a sulficient distance to provide a portion of said overwrap between said tear tapes which when removed by severance of said overwrap along lines exterior of said tear tapes will completely expose at least an entire face of each of the packages in the median row within said bundle.

4. A rectangular shipping bundle comprising a plurality of rectangular packages arrayed in proximate touching relation one to another and pressing against one another under forces acting along the width axis and length axis of said bundle to firmly compact said packages in the direction of both said length and width axes, a flexible overwrap having overlapped edges extending across the bottom panel thereof securing said packages in said relationship to each other, each end section of said overwrap including an end portion of the bottom and top panels of said overwrap completing the seal in cooperation with an end portion of the side panels of said overwrap to maintain said packages in said compacted condition, the reactive forces between said packages being sufficient for maintaining the integrity of said bundle and resisting displacement of packages from said bundle in a direction perpendicular to the said length and width axes, and a pair of spaced apart tear tapes extending across the top panel of said overwrap, said tear tapes defining and comprising the edges of a removable tear strip which includes a major section of said top panel of sufficient width for exposing a face of each package in said bundle, said packages being maintained under the stress of said forces, after the section of said top panel defined by said tear tapes is removed, by the end portions of the bottom panel of said overwrap in cooperation with the'other portions of said overwrap remaining.

5. The invention according to claim 4 wherein each said tear tape comprises a plurality of untwisted monofilaments.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Yount 20665 Nute et a1 22951 Jacobs 20665 Daniels 2295 1 Stone 22951 Fingerhut 53-24 Hassenthaler et a1. 22951 X THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner. 10 M. L. RICE, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/238, 229/240
International ClassificationB65D75/04, B65D75/52, B65D75/62, B65D75/08, B65D75/66
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/08, B65D75/66
European ClassificationB65D75/08, B65D75/66