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Publication numberUS3263999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1966
Filing dateAug 26, 1963
Priority dateAug 26, 1963
Publication numberUS 3263999 A, US 3263999A, US-A-3263999, US3263999 A, US3263999A
InventorsMccoy Howard M
Original AssigneeMccoy Howard M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cards with selected window patterns and pack distinguishing indicia
US 3263999 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

am 3,263,999 OW PATTERNS AND PACK was Aug. 2, 1966 H. M: M CARDS WITH SELECTED WIND DISTINGUISHING lNDICIA Filed Aug.

FIG. l2

INVENTOR HOWARD M. MCCOY ATTORNEY United States Patent 3 263,999 CARDS WITH SELETED WINDOW PATTERNS AND PACK DISTINGUISHING INDICIA Howard M. McCoy, 3 Evergreen Trail, Severna Park, Md. Filed Aug. 26, 1963, Ser. No. 304,404 Claims. (Cl. 273--152.1)

This invention relates to a game utilizing a plurality of packs of :cards containing light transmitting windows based upon a master pattern.

It has been quite common in the past to produce cards containing light transmitting windows for use in filing, identification, selection, games and various other purposes, but heretofore there has never been proposed an arrangement of window containing cards lending themselves to the purposes contemplated by the present invention. Typical examples of perforated cards, or window containing cards, capable of being arranged in packs for various purposes, but lacking the structure and potentialities of the present invention have been noted in the patents to Taylor, 1,165,465, dated December 28, 1915 and Brand, 1,360,617, dated November 30, 1920.

It is among the objects of the present invention to provide a game comprising a plurality of packs of cards, each card containing a relatively large number of light transmitting windows differing from a master pattern by the absence of a relatively small number of such windows, each card of each pack containing a pattern of windows different from each other card in that pack but identical with one card in each of the other packs, whereby superimposition of all cards of one pack will reduce the transmission of light throughout the pattern, each cards in each pack bearing indicia distinguishing it [from each other card in the same pack. The number of distinguishing indicia borne by the cards exceeds the number of cards in each pack so that cards containing identical patterns of windows in different packs will bear different indicia. The cards of each pack bear similar indicia so as to distinguish them from the cards of each other pack. The arrangement of windows of the master pattern preferably form intelligible designs, including legible indicia such as numerals or letters. The windows are preferably arranged in parallel rows and columns.

The game may include a master card containing light transmitting windows conforming to the master pattern and in such event, the master card may be colored differently from the other cards.

A more complete understanding of the invention will follow from a description of the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a master card master pattern of windows;

FIG. 2 to 10 inclusive are plan views of playing cards constituting a pack wherein the patterns of windows differ from the master pattern by the absence of a relatively small number of windows, and differ from one another;

FIG. 11 is a plan view depicting the effect of superimposing the master card of FIG. 1 over the playing cards of both FIGS. 2 and 3;

FIG. 12 is a plan view depicting the master card of FIG. 1 superimposed over all of the playing cards depicted in FIGS. 2 to 10 inclusive;

FIG. 13 is a plan view of a playing :card illustrating a modification; and

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a playing card illustrating another modification.

On the master card depicted in FIG. 1 are imprinted indicia 22 and 24, separated by a dash, to designate respectively the series of the card by the numeral 300 and that it is a master card by the symbol 0.

containing a This card contains windows defined by perforations 26 arranged in vertical columns 28 as well as in horizontal rows 30. The pattern of windows or perforations 26 is such that the form produced is legible to define the letters B, A and T.

The playing cards depicted in FIGS. 2 to 10 inclusive are identified by the reference characters 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46 and 48 respectively. Each of these playing cards bears indicia 50 and 52, separated by a dash, to designate respectively the pack in which these cards belong and an arbitrary number to identify the card of that pack. It will be understood that another pack of cards in the same game will bear a designation other than 318, for example 319 to identify the cards as belonging to a pack other than that designated 318. The numerals following the dashes on these cards assume values higher than the number of cards constituting a pack. For purposes of this description, a pack composed of nine cards has been selected. Yet it will be observed that the numbers following the dashes on these cards are as high as 45 as depicted in FIG. 4. In another pack of cards forming a part of the same game, there will be cards identical with those of the pack illustrated in so far as the arrangements of windows are concerned, but the numerals following the clashes will be different for two cards containing identical patterns of windows. For example, a card in another pack, say pack 319, containing a pattern of dindows identical with that of the card 32 of FIG. 2, might have a designation following the dash of 43. Under these conditions, the indicia of such a card would read 319-43.

To play the game, a plurality of players will each receive a pack of cards, each pack being distinguished from one another by the number of the pack, and accordingly, the numbers lfollowing the dashes on cards having identical patterns of windows will differ. A person, or a suitable device, will announce numbers, corresponding to those following the dashes on the cards, in a random fashion, whereupon the players will superimpose cards bearing those numbers until such time as the light transmitted through the windows of the superimposed cards is obscured or modified over that portion of the pattern agreed upon in advance.

FIG. 11 illustrates the master card of FIG. 1 superimposed over the playing cards 32 and 34 of FIGS. 2 and 3 respectively from which it will appear that the first two columns of windows have their light transmitting properties modified so that the first two columns of B are obscured. It will follow that if the playing cards 32, 34 and 36 of FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 were superimposed, then the entire B would be obscured. This could be the objective of the game, whereupon the successful player would announce the condition which could then be checked by way of confirmation. With respect to the pack of cards illustrated, in order to achieve superimposition of the cards 32, 34 and 36 it would be necessary that the numbers 12, 27 and 45 had been announced. Another player using another pack of cards, would have different designations following the dashes on his cards perforated similarly to those of FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 so that there would be no liklihood that there would be two winners simultaneously. However, if the numbers of packs of cards become so great that duplication occurs in the numbering of any cards following the dashes, then of course there could be a duplication of winners.

It may be that the objective of the game would be to modify the light transmitted throughout the entire pattern of windows. This result has been depicted in FIG. 12 showing the master card 20 of FIG. 1 superimposed over all of the playing cards of FIGS. 2 to 10 inclusive.

3 In this event, it would have been necessary that the numbers 12, 27, 45, 7, 19, 6, 25, 36 and 3 had been announced.

It is unnecessary, of course, that the pattern of windows contained by the cards in each pack, differ from one another by the elimination of an entire column of windows as in the case of the cards depicted in FIGS. 2 to 10 inclusive. In FIG. 13, for example, only one window of the entire pattern has been omitted, namely the window occurring at the uppermost row of the left hand column of the master pattern. The card 54 thus depicted bears indicia 50 and 52, as in the case of the other cards previously described, to design-ate a pack number and card number in that pack, respectively.

The card 56 depicted in FIG. 14 contains windows or apertures 26 differing from those of the master pattern by the omission of the window from the uppermost row of the left hand column and that occurring in the uppermost row of the letter A. By such variations, as indicated for purposes of example in FIGS. 13 and 14, it will be understood that a pack can be composed of many more cards than those constituting the pack represented by FIGS. 2 to 10. The indicia carried by the card 56' of FIG. 14 identifies the pack by the numeral 432 and the number of the card of that pack as 9.

It is not at all necessary to utilize a master card in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12, since by merely superimposing the playing cards themselves, the portion of the pattern having its light transmission characteristics modified will be immediately evident.

Where the openings defining the windows of the cards illustrated have been omitted, if the cards themselves are opaque, no light will be transmitted through such areas. In the event that the card material transmits light of a certain color, then of course the transmission of light theret-hrough will be modified so as to transmit 3 only light of the selected color. The effect is also pOssible where all of the playing cards are provided initially with identical patterns of windows or perforations, following which the pattern differences can be achieved by applying a light modifying material, such as a colored translucent adhesive strip, over the windows of the various cards to produce differences in the patterns of the cards constituting a pack. Such light modifying material may be opaque, translucent, or of a distinctive color.

Instead of using nine cards in a pack, any desired number my be employed. For example, it is contemplated that a pack be composed of twenty-five cards and that the numbers used to identify the cards range from one to seventy-five. In other words, the game is adaptable to any desired number of players.

In order to identify each pattern of windows, the playing cards are marked with suitable similar indicia 56 in their upper right hand corners as depicted in FIGS. 2 to 10, in accordance with some convenient system. In the case illustrated in FIGS. 2 to 10, the numeral appearing for this purpose on each card denotes the column of windows which has been omitted. Thus, in FIG. 2 the first column of windows has been omitted, and the numeral designating this pattern is 1.

The designation 1-1 on the card of FIG. 13 indicates that the window has been omitted from the first column of the first row. The designation 1-1, 5-1 on the card of FIG. 14 indicates that the windows have been omitted from the first column, first row, and from the fifth column, first row,

In the event that it is desired to select a particular card from its pack without turning through all of them, the cards can be notched or perforated in addition, according to well known systems of segregation such as those illustrated by the patents to Tallmadge, 1,150,793, dated August 17, 1915, Brand, 1,360,617, dated Novvember 30, 1920 and Rembold, 2,198,127, dated April 23, 1940. In such event, the numbers used for purposes of such segregation would preferably correspond with those numbers following the dashes on the cards illustrated by the drawings of this application.

Whereas the present invention has been described with respect to specific illustrations, the true scope includes such variations as will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art and within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A game comprising a plurality of packs of cards, each card containing a relatively large number of light transmitting windows differing from a master pattern by the absence of a relatively small number of windows, each card of each pack containing a pattern of windows different from each other card in said pack but identical with one card in each of the other packs, whereby superimposition of all cards of one of said packs will reduce the transmission of light throughout said pattern, each card in each pack bearing indicia distinguishing it from each other card in the same pack, cards containing similar patterns ofwindows bearing dissimilar indicia, and the cards of each pack bearing similar indicia distinguishing them from the cards of each other pack.

2. A game according to claim v1 wherein the distinguishing indicia borne by certain of said cards numerically exceeds the number of cards in each pack.

3. A game according to claim 1 wherein said windows of the master pattern form intelligible designs.

4. A game according to claim 1 wherein said windows are disposed in parallel rows.

5. A game according to claim :1 wherein said windows are disposed in parallel columns.

6. A game according to claim 1 wherein said windows of the master pattern form legible indicia.

7. A game according to claim 1 including a master card containing light transmitting windows conforming to said master pattern.

8. A game according to claim 7 wherein said master card is colored differently from the others of said cards.

9. A game according to claim 1 wherein cards containing similar patterns of windows 'bear similar indicia in addition to the dissimilar indicia.

10. A game according to claim 1 wherein the windows are disposed in columns and rows, with individual cards differing from the master pattern by the absence of windows in at least a selected one of said columns or rows.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,526,717 2/1925 Nunez. 1,527,059 2/1925 Morgan et al. 273-152.l X 1,766,465 6/1930 Snelling 273-152 X 3,186,111 6/1965 Lawlor 129--16.1 X

DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1526717 *Jul 13, 1922Feb 17, 1925Jimenez Nunez EnriqueHomeopathic sheet repertory
US1527059 *Jun 16, 1923Feb 17, 1925George MaddoxApparatus for playing games
US1766465 *Dec 8, 1928Jun 24, 1930Snelling Walter OPlaying cards
US3186111 *Dec 6, 1961Jun 1, 1965Lawlor Reed C"peek-a-boo" retrieval system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3480763 *Nov 8, 1965Nov 25, 1969Gantner George E JrOptical coincidence data analysis system
US3594004 *Mar 15, 1968Jul 20, 1971David J WaltzerGame having quick prize indication
US3688088 *Sep 18, 1970Aug 29, 1972Texaco IncCredit card validation system using an opaque card having translucent coded areas
US3895798 *Sep 17, 1973Jul 22, 1975Clifford J CollinsGame device including game board and punch cards for simulating athletic games such as football
US4140320 *Sep 26, 1977Feb 20, 1979Cortimilia Richard ACard game
US4468037 *Sep 30, 1982Aug 28, 1984Kuhn A KennethCard game using transparent playing cards with opaque indicia
US4671515 *Oct 21, 1985Jun 9, 1987Burgess Step LCard game device
US4941668 *Aug 4, 1989Jul 17, 1990Mobrem Matthew MWord puzzle card game
US5110134 *Mar 1, 1991May 5, 1992No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5219172 *Oct 9, 1991Jun 15, 1993No Peek 21Playing card marks and card mark sensor for blackjack
US5224712 *Apr 10, 1992Jul 6, 1993No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5364106 *Nov 4, 1992Nov 15, 1994No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US6260849 *Jul 28, 1997Jul 17, 2001Chris VanheeGame and apparatus for playing a game
US6808172Nov 1, 2002Oct 26, 2004Mattel, Inc.Board game
US6874785 *Dec 4, 2002Apr 5, 2005Dare Action LimitedGame cards
DE29510979U1 *Jul 12, 1995Nov 14, 1996Kids Promotion GmbhPuzzle
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/293, 235/489, 273/157.00A
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02
European ClassificationA63F1/02