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Publication numberUS3265032 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1966
Filing dateOct 23, 1965
Priority dateOct 23, 1965
Publication numberUS 3265032 A, US 3265032A, US-A-3265032, US3265032 A, US3265032A
InventorsHume Patrick H
Original AssigneeHume Patrick H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cam cleat
US 3265032 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 9, 1966 P. H. HUME CAM CLEAT Original Filed June 15, 1960 United States Patent 3,265,032 CAM CLEAT Patrick H. Hume, 210 E. Pearson St., Chicago, Ill. Continuation of application Ser. No. 35,723, June 13, 1960. This application Oct. 23, 1965, Ser. No. 507,632

Claims. (Cl. 114-218) This is a continuation of application Serial No. 35,723, filed June 13, 1960.

This invention pertains to cam cleats; more especially, to a new design for cam cleats, or alternatively, to an attachment or accessory for existing cam cleats incorporating the new design, which is aimed at facilitating the entry of a line between the line-holding elements.

conventionally, cam cleats comprise a pair of springbiased cam elements, or a single spring-biased cam element and an abutment, that cooperate with each other to define a line-receiving nip between them, The coaction is such that a line, e.g., a sheet, a halliard, or other component of running rigging of a sailboat, when forced into the nip of the cam cleat against the bias of the spring means, may be moved axially in one direction of the line,

but is securely held against retrogessive movement in'the opposite axial direction.

Under certain conditions, such as those encountered when sailing single-handedly in relatively strong winds, it is extremely difficult to force entry of aline into the ordinary types of cam cleat without effecting a substantially axial traverse of line'across the nip of the cam elements while bearing down hard on the' lead end of the line. For small boat handling, a helmsman he quently has but one hand with which to trim sails by adjusting the sheets, and in strong winds a sheet frequently cannot be moved axially the amount necessary to reengage the cam elements of a cleat.

The prime object of this invention is to provide cam cleats with means for facilitating the entry of a line between the cam elements upon movement of the line sideways radially of the line toward the nip of the cleat, thereby displacing the cam elements and enlarging the nip to receive and hold the line without necessitating its axial movement therein.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevational view of a dual cam element cam cleat embodying a preferred form of the invention, shown with parts broken away to illustrate the actuating spring common to both cam elements.

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the cam cleat shown in FIGURE 1.,

FIGURE 3 is an exploded perspective view of a conventional cam cleat shown with parts broken away and having an attachment or accessory that incorporates the present invention associated therewith.

FIGURE 4 is a bottom plan view of the accessory illustrated in FIGURE 3 shown without the associated cam cleat.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, the arrangement illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2 comprises a base 10 having a pair of cam elements 12 and 14 pivoted upon the base on pins 16 and 18, respectively, for pivotal movement toward and away from each other about axes normal to the base. Both of the cam elements 12 and 14 may be pivoted in this manner and urged toward each other by spring means 15, or only one need be pivoted while the other can be stationary as an abutment erected on the base 10 for coaction with the movable cam. In either event, the cam elements cooperate to form a line-receiving nip 20 between them, which, by the relative displacement of the cam elements, can be enlarged to accommodate lines of different diameters.

In accordance with the present invention, the cam elements 12 and 14 have line-engaging faces 22 and 24 in confronting relation to define the nip. These faces, to prevent accidental dislodgment of the line, should be substantially parallel, and should have serrations 26, or other friction means, to increase resistance to slippage.

line, since a'lesser space of entry into the nip will still be effective 'to insure the introduction of a line therein that is somewhat larger.

The cam-horns 28 and 30 are preferablyfaired into the line-engaging faces 22 and 24, and the serrations 26 of the latter preferably extend onto the confronting faces of the cam-horns. Since it is intended that a line be slid into the V-shaped entry and moved downwardly into the nip 20 against the bias of the springs controlling the cam elements 12 and 14, the serrations preferably are oriented'in parallel relation essentially normal to the base 10, so as to afford minimum'frictional resistance to the introduction of a line moving sideways in the intended manner.

a As illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2, a line "is illus trated in phantom lines L, in repose in the V-shaped entry of the cam cleat embodying the present improvement'. Movement of the line L radially toward the nip 20 in direction of arrow A, FIGURE 1, displaces the cam elements apart progressively until the clearance between the line-engaging faces 22 and 24 of the cam elements is substantially that of the diameter of the line, which then movesinto line-holding position. This is represented in FIGURE 2 by the dotted lines 12' and 14' indicating that the cams 12 and 14 are in positions of ultimate displacement as regards the particular line L shown.

When positioned in the cam cleat as shown in FIGURE 2, the line L may be moved in the direction of its axis as indicated by the -arrow B, but is held against retrogressive movement in the opposite axial direction by virtue of the binding action of the cams being forced to bear upon the line by spring pressure.

In the modification of FIGURES 3 and 4, the invention is embodied in an attachment or accessory for use with conventional cam cleats. As illustrated, a molded or die-cast hollow member 30 is shaped to conform snugly and frictionally adhere to one or more of the conventional cam elements 32 of a commercial type of cam cleat. The member 30, in the embodiment shown, is made without a bottom closure for insertion upon the cam cleat, as suggested by FIGURE 3. interior 34 may communicate openly with a cam-horn 36, as shown in FIGURE 4, or the cam-horn may be an integral molded or cast solid attachment on top of the hollow member 30, serrated and faired into the line-engaging face of the latter, as has already been described in connection with FIGURES 1 and 2. The accessory or attachment will adapt conventional cleats for the uses and purposes of the present invention. An opening 38 may be optionally provided to accommodate the head of the pivot pin of the cam element.

The invention is applicable to any types of cam cleats now on the market, whether these be of the dual movable cam type (as illustrated), or the type having one movable cam and a fixed abutment for coacting therewith for the purposes stated. The precise forms shown herein for purposes of illustration are to be regarded as examples without limitation. The invention is realized by the utilization of any means in association with a cam cleat to facilitate the admission of a line therein with- Its hollowed out necessitating (although not precluding) a concomitant axial movement of such line toward and through the cleat, as is set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A cam cleat comprising a base, a cam element pivoted to said base about an axis normal to the latter, means confronting said cam element on said base coacting therewith to form a line-receiving nip, said cam element being relatively displaceable around its pivotal axis to vary the size of said nip for the accommodation of lines of different diameters, spring means biasing said cam element toward said confronting means and additional cam means upon said cam element and faired into said nip constituting a V-shaped entry on the latter in cooperation with said confronting means, so that a line moved toward said nip in a direction radially of the line effects relative displacement between said cam element and said confronting means to the dimension necessary to receive such line within said nip.

2. A cam cleat comprising a base,,a pair of cam elements pivoted upon said base about spaced axes normal to the latter, said cam elements having confronting faces that coact to define a line-gripping nip, spring means biasing said cam elements toward each other normally to maintain said nip in closed position, said cam elements being displaceable about said axes against the bias of said spring means to permit a line to enter said nip and to pass therethrough in one, direction only axially of the line and to hold, the line against retrogressive movement in the opposite axial direction, additional cam means supported by said cam elements cooperating to define a V-entry into said nip, said cam means being effective upon the radialmovement of a line toward said nip to displace said cam elements an amount sufficient to receive the line within the nip without necessitating an axial movement of the line therethrough.

3. An attachment for cam cleats comprising a hollow body open on at least one side for engagement in snug frictional relation over and upon a cam element of a cam cleat, said body having a cam face upon its exterior for engaging a line and for permitting movement of such line in one axial direction therepast only, said cam face flaring outwardly to define additional cam entry means for guiding a line into engagement with said cam face upon movement of such line in a radial direction therepast.

4. A cam cleat comprising a pair of complementary cams spring-biased toward each other to permit the entry and movement of a line in one direction only axially of such line when positioned between them, a pair of complementary attachments for association With said cams, respectively, said attachments comprising additional cam means responsive to the movement of a line in a radial direction toward said cams for separating them against the spring-bias to a dimension substantially equal to the diameter of the line, whereby the latter may enter between said cams.

5. A cam cleat comprising a base, a cam element pivoted to said base about an axis normal to the latter, means confronting said cam element on said base coacting therewith to form a line-receiving nip, said cam element being relatively displaceable on its pivotal axis to vary the size of said nip for the accommodation of lines of different diameters, spring means biasing said cam element and said confronting means toward each other and additional cam means upon said cam element and faired into said nip diverging-at an angle therefrom consitituting a V- shaped entry on the latter in cooperation with said confronting means, .so that a line moved toward said nip in a direction radially of the line effects relative displacement between said cam element and said confronting means to the dimension necessary to receive such line within said nip.

No references cited.

MILTON BUCHLER, Primary Examiner.

B. BELKIN, Assistant Examiner.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3507243 *May 29, 1968Apr 21, 1970Seal Basin Marine CoMarine cleat and rope guide
US3730129 *Jan 25, 1971May 1, 1973Seahorse Spars And Equipment LExtruded cam cleat
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Classifications
U.S. Classification114/218, 24/134.00R, 114/99
International ClassificationB63B21/08, B63B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B21/08
European ClassificationB63B21/08