Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3265084 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1966
Filing dateOct 14, 1964
Priority dateOct 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3265084 A, US 3265084A, US-A-3265084, US3265084 A, US3265084A
InventorsWagner Harold H
Original AssigneeCaterpillar Tractor Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine crankcase breather valve
US 3265084 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1966 H. H. WAGNER 3,265,084

ENGINE CRANKCASE BREATHER VALVE Filed 0012. 14, 1964 ELE INVENTOR. HAROLD H. WAGNER BY MW/ United States Patent "ice 3,265,084 ENGINE CRANKCASE BREATHER VALVE Harold H. Wagner, Peoria, 111., assignor to Caterpillar Tractor Co., Peoria, 111., a corporation of California Filed Oct. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 403,821 3 Claims. (Cl. 137-508) This invention relates to internal combustion engines and particularly to engines having means to communicate vapors or gases under pressure in an engine crankcase to the intake manifold or other part of the air induction system of the engine.

The commonly known engine crankcase vent to relieve pressure from an engine crankcase which results from blow by or leakage of pressure from the combustion chambers past the piston rings, as well as from other causes, has been recognized as a contributing factor in the pollution of air in cities and other densely populated areas. One means that has been employed to prevent air contamination by internal combustion engines includes a conduit connecting the crankcase with the intake manifold so that pressure in the crankcase forces gases therein, which are usually of a combustible nature, into the engine intake where they are consumed with the engine fuel. It is recognized that occasional pressure at the intake side of the engine, as may be caused by back firing at the carburetor, is communicated to the crankcase through such a conduit and can cause a dangerous explosion. It is also known that excessive vacuum at the intake side of the engine can cause withdrawal of lubricating oil from a crankcase.

Various check valves and the like have been devised in attempts to overcome the above mentioned disadvantages but moving metal parts of such devices are subject to becoming gummed and inoperative in the environment of heavy oil vapors to which they are subjected.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a valve for the purpose described which is simple, trouble free, positive in operation and economical to manufacture and which will open under pressure from the engine crankcase but will be closed by pressure from the opposite side and will also be closed by excessive low pressure or suction from the opposite side.

Further and more specific objects and advantages of the invention are made apparent in the following specification wherein the invention is described in detail by reference to the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view in front elevation of an internal combustion engine showing a conduit connecting the crankcase to the engine air intake and a valve enibodying the present invention in said conduit; and

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view through a valve embodying a preferred form of the present invention.

In FIG. 1, an engine 1% is illustrated as having a conduit 11 communicating between its crankcase and a conduit 12 which leads to the engine intake manifold. A valve, generally indicated at 14- and shown in detail in FIG. 2, serves to admit gaseous fluid under pressure from the crankcase to the intake manifold while at the same time preventing reverse flow in the event of a pressure condition existing in the intake manifold and also preventing fiow in the normal direction, that is between the crankcase and the manifold, which might be induced by suction in the manifold.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the valve is shown as having a body member formed of two parts 15 and 16 joined in any suitable manner, here illustrated as a sliding connection secured by a snap ring 17. The part 15 has an inlet opening 13 which is connected with the engine crankcase in use and the part 16 has an outlet opening 19 to be connected with the intake side of the engine.

3,255fi8d Patented August 9, 1966 The interior of the valve body is divided by a diaphragm 20 of flexible rubber-like material which is resistant to the destructive effect of hydrocarbons. This diaphragm has a central opening, the margin of which seats against a valve seat 21 in the valve part 15 and has a central tube-like extension embracing an inwardly extending nipple 22 which communicates with the outlet 19. The diaphragm may be held in place by any suitable means but is here shown as clamped at its outer marginal edge by an annular projection 23 on the valve part 16 and as elastically embracing the nipple 22. The generally tubular part of the diaphragm which extends between the inner margin engaging the valve seat 21 and the nipple 2 is formed as a bellows having at least one outwardly extending fold illustrated at 24.

In operation pressure to be relieved in the crankcase is exerted against the fiat portion of the diaphragm 20 collapsing the bellows-like part so that it moves away from the seal 21 and permits the gas to flow past the seat and outwardly through the outlet 19. In the event of unusually high vacuum or suction in the inlet side of the engine which might effect withdrawal of oil in liquid form from the crankcase, the valve is tightly closed because it tends to collapse the bellows or fold 24 inwardly which also tends to lengthen it in an axial direction and cause pressure against the seat 21. The same construction acts to prevent pressure as from back firing at the suction side of the engine from blowing back into the crankcase with an attendant hazard of explosion and fire. Any such pressure entering the valve through the outlet 19 acts against the inner surface of fold 24 in that area closest to the valve seat 21 as indicated at 26. Pressure in this area obviously also urges the diaphragm toward a closed position against the seat 21. Free flexing of the diaphragm and of the bellows portion thereof is facilitated by an opening 27 which vents the otherwise closed area between the diaphragm and the valve part 16.

The valve of the present invention is inexpensive to manufacture, does not clog and requires no adjustment. Furthermore it serves to maintain a low positive pressure in the engine crankcase to prevent the entry of dirt which results from pressures below atmospheric.

What is claimed is:

1. A valve to control fluid flow comprising a housing having inlet and outlet passages, a centrally dis-posed valve seat, a valve element normally closing connection between said passages, means to permit opening of the valve by pressure in the inlet passage, said valve element comprising a diaphragm bearing against said centrally disposed valve seat; said diaphragm having a central opening normally closed by said valve seat, and a tubular bellows communicating between said opening and said outlet passage; said means including said inlet passage communicating with the diaphragm in an annular area outwardly of the seat and an atmospheric passage communicating with the diaphragm in an annular area inwardly of the seat, whereby said valve remains closed unless the inlet pressure is above atmospheric pressure.

2. A valve for controlling fluid flow comprising a housing having inlet and outlet passages, a centrally positioned annular valve seat therein disposed in spaced substantially concentric relation to the inner end of said outlet passage, a valve element in said housing normally closing connection between said passages, said valve element comprising an annular flexible diaphragm having its inner peripheral edge bearing against said annular valve seat, said diaphragm having a tubular bellows integral with said inner peripheral edge and providing communication between said inlet passage and said inner end of said outlet passage upon opening the valve, the annular area of said diaphragm outwardly of said valve seat being in direct contact with said inlet flow and the annular area of said diaphragm inwardly of said valve seat being in direct contact with atmospheric pressure whereby the pressure on the inlet side of the diaphragm must be greater than atmospheric pressure to open the valve to permit fluid to flow therethrough.

3. A valve to control fluid flow comprising a housing having inlet and outlet passages, a centrally disposed annular valve seat, the inner end of said outlet passage terminating in spaced concentric relation to said valve seat, a valve element in said housing normally closing connection between said passages, said valve element comprising an annular flexible diaphragm having an integral tubular bellows extending from the inner periphery thereof, the outer peripheral edge of said diaphragm being hermetically secured to said housing, said inner peripheral edge of said diaphragm being in valve seating engagement with said valve seat, and the outer end of said tubular bellows being hermetically secured to said inner end of said outlet passage, the inlet side of said diaphragm being in direct contact with the incoming fluid and the outlet side being in communication with the atmosphere whereby the pressure on the inlet side of the diaphragm must be greater than atmospheric pressure to open the valve to permit fluid to flow therethrongh.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS M. CARY NELSON, Primary Examiner.

MARTIN P. SCHWADRON, Examiner.

S. SCOTT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2538436 *Apr 29, 1947Jan 16, 1951Edison Inc Thomas AControl valve
US2935083 *Jul 25, 1955May 3, 1960Singer Valve Company LtdPressure reducing valve
US3056420 *Jun 15, 1960Oct 2, 1962Gen Motors CorpCrankcase vent valve
US3144044 *Dec 6, 1962Aug 11, 1964Union Carbide CorpApparatus for providing closed ventilation of automotive crankcases
US3145697 *Jul 2, 1963Aug 25, 1964Etal J M BarrCrankcase reculating system
GB605569A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3804113 *Jun 21, 1971Apr 16, 1974Alfa Romeo SpaAutomatic non-return valve
US4672996 *May 22, 1986Jun 16, 1987Cem CorporationSelf-regulating valve
US4877624 *Apr 19, 1988Oct 31, 1989Cem CorporationDigestion and sterilization methods and apparatus
US6213144 *Aug 25, 1999Apr 10, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.In-line valve
US6330878May 31, 2000Dec 18, 2001Siemens Canada LimitedEvaporative emission leak detection system including vacuum regulator with sensitive seal
US6453932Mar 6, 2001Sep 24, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.In-line valve
US6612328Sep 3, 2002Sep 2, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.In-line valve
DE2742292A1 *Sep 20, 1977Aug 3, 1978Max BachmannKurbelgehaeuseentlueftungsventil fuer brennkraftmaschinen
DE2753335A1 *Nov 30, 1977May 31, 1979Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz AgKurbelgehaeuseentlueftungsventil
EP0104420A1 *Aug 22, 1983Apr 4, 1984Eberhard StegemannAerating or venting device for closed containers or housings
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/508, 251/282, 137/483, 137/859
International ClassificationF01M13/02, F01M13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01M13/023
European ClassificationF01M13/02N2B