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Publication numberUS3265344 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1966
Filing dateFeb 19, 1965
Priority dateFeb 19, 1965
Publication numberUS 3265344 A, US 3265344A, US-A-3265344, US3265344 A, US3265344A
InventorsReuben Ornstein
Original AssigneeReuben Ornstein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Furniture construction
US 3265344 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 9, 1966 v R. ORNSTEIIN 3,265,344

FURNITURE CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 19, 1965 mveu'rom REUBEN ORNSTEIN Wg -Zm/ United States Patent 3,265,344 FURNITURE CONSTRUCTION Reuben Ornstein, 30 Maujer St., New York, N.Y. Filed Feb. 19, 1965, Ser. No. 433,948 3 Claims. (Cl. 248-243) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in furniture construction, and in particular the invention concerns itself with a shelf arrangement wherein a shelf panel is supported by brackets which are adjustably mounted on vertical standards so that the height or elevation of the shelf panel may be varied.

The principal object of the invention is to provide, in a shelf arrangement as above outlined, simple and effective means for quickly and easily mounting the shelf bracket in a selected one of a plurality of vertically spaced locations along the standard, such mounting means being readily attachable and detachable so that the location of the bracket on the standard may be conveniently changed, when so desired.

The shelf arrangement of the invention is particularly well suited to be made from wood, and one of its important advantages is that the shelf panel to bracket and the bracket to standard fastening means are hidden from view, so that the entire assembly has a highly aesthetic appearance, unmarred by exposed nail or screw heads, and the like.

With the foregoing more important objects and features in view and such other objects and features as may become apparent as this specification proceeds, the invention will be understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like characters of reference are used to designate like parts, and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary isometric view showing the standard and shelf bracket of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary vertical sectional detail, taken substantially in the plane of the line 2-2 in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional detail, taken substantially in the plane of the line 3-3 in FIG- URE 2;

FIGURE 4 is an end View of the shelf bracket with its locking member;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the back face of the standard;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary sectional detail, similar to that shown in FIGURE 3, but illustrating a modified arrangement;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the back face of a modified standard;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary sectional detail on an enlarged scale, taken substantially in the plane of the line 8-8 in FIGURE 7, with the bracket applied to the front face of the standard; and

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged perspective view of one of the T-nuts used in the embodiment of FIGURES l-6.

Referring now to the accompanying drawings in detail more particularly to FIGURES 1-5 inclusive, the shelf arrangement of the invention embodies a vertical standard 15 on which is adjustably mounted a shelf supporting bracket 16, the adjustment being such that the bracket may be positioned at a selected one of a plurality of vertically spaced locations along the standard in order to support a shelf at a desired height or elevation. One feature of the invention resides in the provision of means for mounting the bracket on the standard, as will be presently described.

Both the bracket and the standard are preferably made of wood, and the standard 15 is drilled with a plurality of vertically spaced apertures 17, extending rearwardly 3,265,344 Patented August 9, 1966 from the front face of the standard. The back face of the standard is milled to form a circular seat 18 and a counterbore 19 coaxially with each of the apertures 17 as is best shown in FIGURE 3, to accommodate a T-nut 20 shown in perspective in FIGURE 9. The T-nut 20 includes a disc-shaped base 21 which fits flush into the seat 18 and an internally screw-threaded tubular boss 21 which is received in the counterbore 19, as will be apparent from FIGURES 2 and 3. The circumferential edge portion of the base 21 has a plurality of pointed prongs 22 struck out therefrom, these prongs being embedded into the body of the standard 15 when the T-nut 20 is installed in position. It will be understood, of course, that several of the T-nuts 20 are provided in the back face of the standard as shown in FIGURE 5, one T-nut being in register with each of the apertures 17. A screw-threaded fastener 23 is insertable selectively through the apertures 17 into engagement with the screwthreaded boss 21 of the associated T-nut 20, the fastener 23 having an enlarged head 23' disposed somewhat forwardly from the front face of the standard for engagement with a cooperating locking member 24 in the shelf bracket 16.

The locking member 24 assumes the form of a vertically elongated plate 25 which is mounted by a pair of screws 26 in a recess 27 formed in the rear end of the bracket 16, the recess being stepped as at 27' for seating the plate 25 in spaced relation from the inner or forward wall 27" of the recess. The plate 25 is formed with a keyhole slot 28, the large end of which is its lower end and is sufiiciently large to permit the screw head 23' to pass therethrough when the bracket is applied to the front face of the standard. The upper, narrow end portion of the slot 28 is provided at its opposite sides with a pair of inclined or slanted wedging surfaces 2?, so that after the screw head 23' has been passed through the large end of the slot and the bracket 16 is slid downwardly somewhat along the standard 15, the inclined surfaces 29 wedgingly engage the screw head and, as a result, the rear end of the bracket is drawn tightly against the front face of the standard. In this manner the bracket is firmly held in a selected position on the standard, but may be readily removed therefrom by simply reversing the installation procedure already described.

In the slightly modified arrangement shown in FIG- URE 6 the front face of the standard 15a is provided with a vertical, channel-like groove 30 which is of substantially the same width as the width or thickness of the bracket 16. When the bracket is mounted, its rear end portion fits into the groove 30 and the side walls of the groove prevent the bracket from turning or twisting about the axis of the screw 23.

The further modified arrangement of the standard shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 dispenses with the plurality of individual T-nuts 18 and in their place utilizes a metal strip 31 which is embedded in a vertical groove 32 formed in the rear face of the standard 15b. The strip 31 is drilled, extruded and screw-threaded as at 33 at vertically spaced points to selectively receive the screw 23, the single strip thus serving in place of the plurality of individual T-nuts. To improve its rigidity, the strip 31 may be provided with side flanges 34 and any suitable means may be employed for securing the strip in the groove 32, as for example, by press-fitting, or by adhesive, or by one or more screws 35 as shown in FIGURE 7.

A suitable shelf panel (not shown) may be retained in position on the shelf bracket 16 in any suitable manner, preferably by cushion pads 37 of rubber, plastic, or the like, which are adhesively secured to the upper edge of the bracket, these pads being adhesively coated on the top surface thereof so as to adhesively retain a shelf panel in position. The numeral 37' designates protec- 3 tive paper, or the like, which initially covers the adhesively coated top surface of the pads and is peeled off as indicated by the dotted lines in FIG. 2, before the shelf panel is applied to the pads.

While in the foregoing there have been described and shown the preferred embodiments of the invention, various modifications may become apparent to those skilled in the art to which the invention relates. Accordingly, it is not desired to limit the invention to this disclosure, and various modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is:

1. In furniture construction, the combination of a vertical standard of non-metallic material provided at vertically spaced points with apertures, metallic insert means embedded in said standard and provided with screwthreaded bores in register with saidapertures, a screwthreaded fastener received selectively in the apertures of said standard and anchored in the registering one of said screw-threaded bores, a shelf bracket vertically adjustable on said standard according to the location of said fastener,

said bracket having an inner end portion in abutment with the standard and formed with a recess, said fastener having a head portion projecting into said recess, and a wedge-type locking member mounted in said recess, said head portion of said fastener being in separable wedging engagement with said locking member whereby to removably secure said bracket to said standard, said locking member comprising a plate formed with a keyhole slot having a relatively large end receiving the head portion of said fastener therethrough and a relatively narrow end portion with inclined surfaces at opposite sides thereof to wedgingly engage the head portion of the fastener after the latter is passed through the large end of said slot.

2. In furniture construction, the combination of a vertical standard provided at vertically spaced points with screw-threaded apertures, a bolt having a screw-threaded shank selectively and adjustably received in said apertures, said shank projecting outwardly from said standard and said bolt also having an enlarged head adjustably spaced from the standard in accordance with adjustment of the shank in the selected one of said apertures, a shelf bracket vertically adjustable on said standard according to the location of said bolt, said bracket having an inner end portion in abutment with the standard and provided with a vertically elongated recess open in the direction of the standard, said bolt projecting into said recess, and a wedge-type locking member mounted in the recess of said bracket, said locking member comprising a vertically elongated plate provided with a keyhole slot including a relatively large lower end portion of sufiicient size to pass the head of said bolt therethrough and a relatively narrow upper end portion Wide enough to receive only the bolt shank, said narrow upper end portion of said slot being disposed centrally with respect to said large lower end portion of the slot and regions of said plate at opposite sides of the narrow slot portion being upwardly inclined to provide wedging surfaces slanting progressively further away from the inner end of said bracket, said wedging surfaces engaging the head of said bolt whereby upon proper adjustment of the bolt shank in its selected screw-threaded aperture the bolt head coacting with said locking member may firmly draw the inner end of said bracket into abutment with said standard.

3. The device as defined in claim 2 wherein said bolt constitutes sole bolt means for connecting said bracket to said standard, said standard being provided with a vertical channel-shaped groove, said inner end portion of said bracket being received in and of substantially the same width as said groove, whereby to prevent the bracket from turning relative to the standard about said sole bolt means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,229,427 6/ 1919 Erismann 248 -243 2,102,558 12/1937 Johnson 15141.73 2,256,024 9/1941 -Hil1 21410.5 2,435,079 1/1948 Hotchkin 15141.73 X 2,788,902 4/1957 Nowicki l08106 X 2,796,158 6/1957 Miles et a1. 248-243 X 2,803,352 8/1957 Smola et a1. 248243 2,900,085 8/1959 Levy 248250 X 3,029,056 4/1962 Breglia 2l1147 FOREIGN PATENTS 365,254 1/ 1932 Great Britain. 807,558 l/ 1959 Great Britain.

FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

I. T. MCCALL, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1229427 *Apr 1, 1916Jun 12, 1917Fritz ErismannBracket-support or the like.
US2102558 *Sep 26, 1935Dec 14, 1937United Carr Fastener CorpNut and installation thereof
US2256024 *Nov 24, 1939Sep 16, 1941Hill IrvingApparatus for stacking articles
US2435079 *Jul 24, 1945Jan 27, 1948Palnut CompanyFastening device
US2788902 *Nov 16, 1955Apr 16, 1957L A Darling CompanyAttachment mechanism
US2796158 *Oct 22, 1947Jun 18, 1957Johns ManvilleWall assembly
US2803352 *Jun 24, 1954Aug 20, 1957Republic Steel CorpBracket for metal shelving
US2900085 *Jun 2, 1955Aug 18, 1959Reflector Hardware CorpAdjustable shelf rack and reversible bracket therefor
US3029056 *Oct 27, 1960Apr 10, 1962Breglia Arthur FReversible support means for shelving and the like
GB365254A * Title not available
GB807558A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3311073 *Apr 4, 1966Mar 28, 1967Empire Showcase & Fixture CoWall shelf
US3333555 *Apr 11, 1966Aug 1, 1967Bertram H KapnekShelf assembly
US3451362 *Sep 20, 1967Jun 24, 1969Modular SystFurniture construction having yieldable recessed fastening means
US3561376 *Mar 18, 1968Feb 9, 1971Knoblock Frederick DFolding table and folding table attachments
US3652048 *Aug 6, 1970Mar 28, 1972Hartman Wood Products IncVertically adjustable wall bracket assembly for mounting a shelf
US3672624 *Apr 2, 1971Jun 27, 1972Baldwin Tool IncShelf bracket structure
US3687410 *Mar 17, 1971Aug 29, 1972Holmgren Ephraim TShelf brackets
US3727544 *Mar 9, 1971Apr 17, 1973Devillard PMethod and means for securing shelves and the like supports between two walls
US3754518 *Dec 15, 1971Aug 28, 1973Wachtel SRapid mounting shelf
US3786765 *Feb 28, 1972Jan 22, 1974Howe Folding Furniture IncCarrel construction
US3964403 *Dec 23, 1974Jun 22, 1976Stakmore Co., Inc.Three-way table
US4121801 *Sep 12, 1977Oct 24, 1978Kellogg Harlan FShelf bracket
US4178047 *Aug 17, 1977Dec 11, 1979Modular Systems, Inc.Furniture units with concealed fasteners and method therefor
US4189459 *Aug 9, 1978Feb 19, 1980Jones Wilson MMethod of making a shelf support post
US4299367 *Dec 13, 1979Nov 10, 1981Harlan F KelloggShelf bracket
US4332205 *Sep 13, 1979Jun 1, 1982Modular Systems, Inc.Interlocking furniture assembly and method
US4460147 *Jan 5, 1981Jul 17, 1984Macbain Kathleen RMounting brackets for shelves and panels
US4587788 *Apr 11, 1983May 13, 1986Bielicki Michael DFastening device
US4836484 *Apr 4, 1988Jun 6, 1989Reed Robert HWall bracket assembly
US4966343 *Jul 14, 1989Oct 30, 1990Knape & Vogt Manufacturing CompanyAesthetic shelving system
US5002248 *Jul 14, 1989Mar 26, 1991Knape & Vogt Manufacturing CompanyBeam and telescopic connector shelving system
US5004201 *Jul 14, 1989Apr 2, 1991Knape & Vogt Manufacturing CompanyInterlock shelving bracket and standard cover
US5069408 *Jul 14, 1989Dec 3, 1991Knape & Vogt Manufacturing CompanyShelving mount system
US5097771 *Jan 7, 1991Mar 24, 1992James Iii J HatcherWall-mounted shelf unit
US5911180 *Aug 21, 1996Jun 15, 1999Mullens; Gordon E.Knock-down (unassembled) interlocking shelf unit
US6691964 *Mar 12, 2003Feb 17, 2004Pgm Products, LlcEasy view invisible mounting system
US7611107 *Nov 10, 2005Nov 3, 2009Multimatic Inc.Structural bridging fastener
US8356954Jul 13, 2007Jan 22, 2013Jon Russell KochAssembly apparatus for modular components especially for upholstered furniture
US8430252 *Jul 20, 2010Apr 30, 2013Edward T. SusanWall mounted shelving system
US8721185 *Apr 28, 2011May 13, 2014Joao Carlos MarchesanConstructive arrangement added to a support for assembling agricultural tilting bearings
US20040181207 *Mar 12, 2003Sep 16, 2004Vitullo Jeffrey M.Catheter with limited longitudinal extension
US20060226316 *Mar 11, 2005Oct 12, 2006Sellers Craig LShelf support bracket
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US20120272516 *Apr 28, 2011Nov 1, 2012Marchesan Implementos E Maquinas Agricolas Tatu S/AConstructive arrangement added to a support for assembling agricultural tilting bearings
EP0602392A1 *Nov 12, 1993Jun 22, 1994Wella AktiengesellschaftHeight-adjustable objects supporting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/243, 108/42, 108/152, 248/200
International ClassificationF16B12/00, A47B57/46, F16B12/02, A47B57/52, A47B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B57/46, F16B12/02, A47B57/52
European ClassificationF16B12/02, A47B57/46, A47B57/52