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Publication numberUS3266075 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1966
Filing dateAug 10, 1964
Priority dateAug 10, 1964
Publication numberUS 3266075 A, US 3266075A, US-A-3266075, US3266075 A, US3266075A
InventorsConrad Thomas A
Original AssigneeConrad Thomas A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shell case cleaner
US 3266075 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

16, 1966 T. A. CONRAD 3,266,075

SHELL CASE CLEANER Filed Aug. 10, 1964 INVENTOR.

United tet 3,266,075 SHELL CASE CLEANER Thomas A. Conrad, PI). Box 128, Port Angeies, Wash. Filed Aug. 10, 1964, Ser. No. 388,556 10 Ciaims. (Cl. 15-10433) This invention generally relates to ammunition and has for its primary object to provide novel means for expeditiously and thoroughly cleaning the body, shoulder and neck portions of cases of both rifle and hand gun cartridges, preparatory to reloading said cases.

Another highly important object of the present invention is to provide, in a manner as hereinafter set forth, an ammunition case cleaner of the aforementioned character which also is adapted to brush the interior of the neck of rifle cartridge cases.

Still another important object of the invention is to provide an improved cleaner of the character described which will readily accept various sizes of cartridge cases.

Another object is to provide a rotary cartridge case cleaner which is adapted to be secured in the usual chuck of a conventional portable electrical power drill or other tool for actuation thereby.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide an improved cartridge case cleaner of the character set forth which is comparatively simple in construction, strong, durable, compact, of light weight and which may be manufactured at low cost.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view, showing a device embodying the present invention in use with a rifle cartridge case therein;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on the line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of the device;

FIGURE 4 is a cross-sectional view, taken substantially on the line 44 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view, taken substantially on the line 55 of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 6 is a view substantially similar to FIGURE 2 but showing the device with a pistol cartridge case therein.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, it will be seen that the embodiment of the present invention which has been illustrated comprises a cylindrical housing or receptacle of a suitable plastic which is generally designated by the reference numeral 8. The housing or receptacle 8, which may also be of any desired dimensions, is open at its forward end and comprises an externally threaded forward portion 10. The housing 3 further comprises a substantially conical closed rear end 12 having molded centrally therein a rearw-ardly projecting shank 14 of a suitable metal. The shank 14 is adapted to be removably mounted in the usual chuck 16 of a conventional portable electric power tool. Longitudinal fins or the like 18 on the forward end portion of the shank 14 assist in anchoring said shank in the end portion 12 of the housing 8. This end portion of the shank 14 is further provided with a longitudinal bore or socket 26 which communicates with the housing 8 and the purpose of which will be presently set forth.

Cylindrical packing rings 22 of felt or other suitable material are removably mounted in the housing 8. It will be noted that the forwardmost pair of cleaning rings 22 are of a larger inside diameter than the remaining ice rings 22. It also will be noted that the forwardmost rings 22 project beyond the open forward end of the housing 8. A removable nut or cap 24 is threaded for adjustment on the end portion 10 of the housing 8 for retaining and compressing the rings 22 therein. The retaining nut or cap 24 is provided with a central opening 26 which receives the cartridge case to be cleaned. Diametrically opposite longitudinal ribs or keys 28 in the housing 8 retain the rings 22 against rotation. The ring retaining nut or cap 24 is longitudinally grooved as indicated at 30 to facilitate turning same.

Mounted centrally in the housing 8 and extending through the rings 22 therein is a brush 32. The brush 32, in the embodiment shown, comprises a longitudinal core 34 of twisted together wires having secured therebetween radiating bristles 36. Aflixed to the rear or inner end of the core 34 is a square longitudinal shank 38. The shank 38 includes a reduced, threaded rear end portion providing a stem or the like 40 which is screwed into the bore or socket 20 of the shank 14. Thus, the brush 32 is mounted on the shank 14 for rotation therewith and a reduced stem 40 provides a locking shoulder 42 which abuts said shank 14. It will be observed that the brush 32 projects forwardly 'beyond the housing 8 and the rings 22.

It is thought that the use or operation of the device will be readily apparent from a consideration of the foregoing. Briefly, the shank 14 is secured in an obvious manner in the chuck 14 of a suitable portable electric power tool. In FIGURES 1 and 2 of the drawing, reference numeral 44 designates a rifle cartridge case to be cleaned. While holding the case 44 by the breech end portion 46 thereof, said case is inserted longitudinally in the housing 8 through the opening 26 in the cap 24, said case being forced through the rings 22 and compressing same. The rapidly rotating rings 22 quickly clean the exterior of the case which, of course, is held against rotation. The construction and arrangement of the relatively large and small rings 22 is such that substantially all portions of the case 44 to the breech end portion 46 thereof are cleaned. Also, as the case 44 is thus inserted the brush 32 cleans the interior of the neck portion of said case. In FIGURE 6 of the drawings reference numeral 48 designates the relatively short case of a pistol or other hand gun cartridge being cleaned. The forward pair of rings 22 of relatively large inside diameter accommodate the comparatively short case 48 the body of which, as usual, is of uniform diameter.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A cartridge case cleaning device comprising a generally cylindrical housing open at one end for receiving a cartridge case to be cleaned, a brush fixed centrally in the housing in spaced relation thereto and engageable in the case, a plurality of cleaning rings in the housing encircling the brush and thereby defining an annular recess between the rings and the brush for receiving the case, means for connecting the housing to a source of power for rotation thereby, said rings being compressible, and a cap threaded for adjustment on the open end portion of the housing for compressing and retaining the rings therein, said cap having an opening therein for the passage of the case.

2. A cartridge case cleaning device in accordance with s,2ee,075

3 claim 1, certain of said rings having a reduced inside diameter receiving a reduced neck portion of the case.

3. The combination of claim 2, together with longitudinal keys in the housing engaged in the periphery of the rings for locking same to said housing for rotation therewith.

4. The combination of claim 3, said means including a shank mounted centrally in the other end portion of the housing and projecting longitudinally therefrom for engagement in the chuck of an electric power tool.

5. The combination of claim 4, said brush being elongated and including a core affixed longitudinally to one end of the shank.

6. The combination of claim 5, said shank having a threaded bore in said one end, said core comprising a polygonal shank including a reduced stem threaded into the bore and providing a locking shoulder abutting the first-named shank.

7. A cartridge case cleaning device comprising a generally cylindrical housing open at one end for receiving a cartridge case to be cleaned, a brush fixed centrally in the housing in spaced relation thereto and engageable in the case, at least one cleaning ring in the housing encircling the brush and thereby defining an angular recess between the ring and the brush for receiving the case, means for connecting the housing to a source of power for rotation thereby, said ring being compressible, and a cap threaded for adjustment on the open end portion of 4 the housing for compressing and retaining the ring therein, said cap having an opening therein for the passage of the case.

8. The combination of claim 7, together with longitudinal keys in the housing engaged in the periphery of said ring for locking same to said housing for rotation therewith.

9. The combination of claim 7, said means including a shank mounted centrally in the other end portion of the housing and projecting longitudinally therefrom for engagement in the chuck of an electric power tool.

10. The combination of claim 9, said brush being elongated and including a core affixed longitudinally to one end of the shank.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,717,554 6/1929 Fraser 51-73 2,032,915 3/1936 Cunningham 15-75 2,296,801 9/1942 Thomas 15-104.03 X 2,303,824 12/1942 Comins 15-10404 X 2,593,735 4/1952 Delzell 1597 X 2,713,693 7/1955 Johnson 15-160 X CHARLES A. 'WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

EDWARD L. ROBERTS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1717554 *Jan 21, 1926Jun 18, 1929Charles A SmithPlug-polishing device
US2032915 *Oct 5, 1929Mar 3, 1936Cunningham JohnTumbler washing device
US2296801 *Dec 18, 1940Sep 22, 1942Sylvania Electric ProdBulb neck wiping device for lamps
US2303824 *Aug 20, 1940Dec 1, 1942Ralph B CominsHose resizing tool
US2593735 *Nov 13, 1950Apr 22, 1952Delzell Walter CElectric switchboard plug polisher
US2713693 *Oct 21, 1949Jul 26, 1955Johnson Arnold EFinger-nail polish remover
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3429218 *Jul 31, 1967Feb 25, 1969Olson Ole NPrimer pocket cleaner for use in reloading firearm cartridges
US4862549 *Aug 5, 1988Sep 5, 1989Criswell Gerald WPipe preparation device for soldering or brazing
US5056265 *Feb 27, 1990Oct 15, 1991Hurst Richard HTube end abrading tool
US5058327 *Jul 25, 1990Oct 22, 1991John BuchananTubing and fitting stripper
US5200571 *Apr 6, 1992Apr 6, 1993Gracey Doyle DPrimer pocket cleaner
US5221806 *Jul 31, 1992Jun 22, 1993Blount, Inc.Multiple purpose die for reloading press
US5222271 *Jul 9, 1992Jun 29, 1993Eganhouse Thomas JSpeculum cleaner
US5566416 *Aug 30, 1995Oct 22, 1996Schaefer Brush Manufacturing Company, Inc.Two-in-one brush
US6397720Aug 8, 2000Jun 4, 2002Thomas Michael FoxCartridge case reforming die having precise measuring system
US7124882Jan 20, 2004Oct 24, 2006Emyr JadydyPipe cleaning kit
US20110154591 *Mar 8, 2011Jun 30, 2011Ernster Joel ACleaner for suction coagulator
US20120160081 *Dec 22, 2010Jun 28, 2012Redding Reloading EquipmentResizing die for spent straight wall cartridges
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.3, 15/164, 15/114, 86/24
International ClassificationF42B33/00, F42B33/06
Cooperative ClassificationF42B33/06
European ClassificationF42B33/06