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Publication numberUS3266203 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1966
Filing dateMay 3, 1963
Priority dateMay 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3266203 A, US 3266203A, US-A-3266203, US3266203 A, US3266203A
InventorsKrantz Frank M
Original AssigneeKrantz Frank M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Structure for atomic blast resistance
US 3266203 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1966 F. M. KRANTZ 3,266,203

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Z/ 7 Z/ INVENTOR.

FRANK M. KRANTZ United States Patent 3,266,203 STRUCTURE FOR ATOMIC BLAST RESJISTAN CE Frank M. Krantz, Ellicott City, Md., assignor, by mesne assignments, to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed May 3, 1963, Ser. No. 277,967 4 Claims. (Cl. 52-80) The present invention relates to a wall structure and more particularly to a wall structure that is designed to resist high impact loads of a blast, such as an atomic explosion.

In order for a structure to survive an impact caused by a blast, the structure must be capable of storing a large quantity of strain energy in the elastic region of the material. In structures composed of ordinary rolled sections with pin-jointed connections, the strain energy is mainly contained in the bracing elements as tension or compression loading, and consequently only those brace elements which oppose the distortion of the directional forces take part in the energy storage. Thus in many ordinary structures, a major portion of the strain energy, which might be the result of a blast, is applied to only about ten percent of the structural material and as a result there is a failure.

In the present invention, a plurality of flat rectangularshaped panels are provided and adjacent panels are connected, as by riveting, to a column-rib, which, by way of example, might be a high strength aluminum alloy extrusion. The column-rib has a center cell section which is substantially rectangular in cross-sectional area and two side cel-l section-s, are on each side of the center cell section, which are triangular in cross-sectional area. The central cell acts as a column with a high moment of inertia and inherent stability. A pair of flanges extend outwardly from the center cell section, and a pair of webs also extend outwardly and angularly and terminate with a foot that extends substantially parallel with the flange that it approaches. The fiat rectangular-shaped panels are inserted between a flange and a foot and riveted thereto, and thus maximum load transfer is achieved between the elements of the structure.

When a plurality of panels and column-ribs are connected, a polygonal enclosure is formed due to an angular bend that is provided on each column-rib. This enclosure can be secured, as by welding, riveting, or bolting to a deck or floor, and then a completely enclosed container can be provided by securing a hemispherical section to the top of the polygonal section.

It is therefore a general object of the present invention to provide an enclosure which through its novel design flllld construction will withstand a high impact load of a b ast.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a wall structure that will transfer substantial loads from one element to another.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention; and

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 22 of FIGURE 1.

Referring now to the drawing, there is shown in FIGURE 1 an enclosed structure consisting of a polygonal section 11 and a hemispherical section 12 that are connected together by any well-known means, such as welding. The polygonal section 11 is comprised OLf a plurality of fiat rectangular panels 13 that are connected by a plurality of column-ribs 14. By way of example, polygonal section 11 is shown comprised of thirty-two panels 13 which are riveted in pairs to thirty-two columnribs 14, however, it should be understood that a greater or lesser number of panels and column-ribs could be used without departing from the scope of the invention.

Referring now to FIGURE 2 of the drawing, it can be seen that the column-ribs are each comprised of a center cell section '15 that is formed by parallel sides 16 and 17 and sides 18 and 19. Side 19 is slanted from its mid-point in both directions and it is these slants that determine the number of panels required to enclose the polygonal section. Flanges 21 and 22 are provided as an extension of side 19 and webs 23 and 24 extend angularly from side \18 toward flanges 21 and 22, respectively, and thereby form side cell sections 25 and 26. Web 23 is provided with a foot 27 that extends substantially parallel with change 21, and likewise Web 24 is provided with a foot 28 that extends substantially parallel with flange 22. A pair of adjacent panels 13 are joined to a column-rib 14 by inserting a portion of each panel between a flange and a foot and securing thereto by means of rivets 29.

When the polygonal section is assembled, each central cell 15 acts as a column with a high moment of inertia and inherent stability. The webs apply secondary support in elastic stability at side 18 and as panel 13 is riveted between a flange and a foot on a web, a clamp boundary condition is produced on the panel which achieves maximum load transfer between the elements.

It can thus be seen that the present invention provides an improved blast resistant structure that is relatively simple and economical to construct. Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood, that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. In a metallic structure having high blast resistance, a plurality of flat rectangular-shaped panels and a plurality of column-ribs connecting adjacent panels thereby forming an enclosed chamber, said column-ribs each comprising,

a hollow column having first and second parallel sides,

first and second flanges extending outwardly in opposite directions, one each from an end of each of said parallel sides,

a first web extending angularly from the other end of said first parallel side and in a direction toward said first flange, said web having a toot extending in a substantially parallel direction with said first flange, and

a second Web extending angularly from the other end of said second parallel side and in a direction toward said second flange, said second web having a foot extending in a substantially parallel direction with said second flange.

2. In a metallic structure having high blast resistance as set forth in claim 1 wherein each said panel is riveted to adjacent column-ribs between one of said flanges and one of said feet.

3 3. A metallic structure having high blast resistance consisting of a polygonal section and a hemispherical section attached together, said polygonal section including a plurality of flat panels and a plurality of column-ribs connecting adjacent panels thereby forming an enclosed chamber, said column-ribs each comprising,

a hollow column having first and second parallel sides,

first and sec-0nd flanges extending outwardly in opposi-te directions, one each from an end each of said parallel sides,

a first web extending angula'rly from the other end of said first parallel side and in a direction toward said first flange, said web having a foot extending in a substantially parallel direction with said first flange, and

a second web extending angularly from the other end 4 of said second parallel side and in a direction toward said second flange, said second web having a foot extending in a substantially parallel direction with said second flange.

4. A metallic structure as set forth in claim 3 wherein each said panel is riveted to each adjacent column-nib between one of said flanges and one of said feet.

References Qited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,463,612 3 1949 'Grudda 5 2-495 FOREIGN PATENTS 544,851 4/ 1942 Great Britain.

RICHARD W. COOKE, In, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2463612 *Sep 16, 1946Mar 8, 1949August GruddaLog or post cabin structure
GB544851A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5448860 *Apr 16, 1993Sep 12, 1995Menke; John L.Prefabricated observatory dome structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/81.6, 52/843, 52/781, 52/245
International ClassificationE04H9/10, E04H9/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04H9/10
European ClassificationE04H9/10