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Publication numberUS3266674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1966
Filing dateAug 24, 1964
Priority dateAug 24, 1964
Publication numberUS 3266674 A, US 3266674A, US-A-3266674, US3266674 A, US3266674A
InventorsMartin Robert S
Original AssigneeRichard L Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermo-shave dispensing and reusable unit
US 3266674 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1966 R. s. MARTIN ,5

THERMO-SHAVE DISPENSING AND REUSABLE UNIT Filed Aug. 24, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR.

THERMO-SHAVE DISPENSING AND REUSABLE UNIT Filed Aug. 24, 1964 v 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. A oae/Pr 5. MQf/A/ United States The present invention relates to an improved thermoshave dispensing unit, and has more particular reference to an improved thermo-shave dispensing unit that is repeatedly reusable by being adapted to having the dispensing unit or container refilled when it has become empty from use.

The conventional type of shaving cream dispensing containers generally now in use have as their chief propellant a halogenated alkane with a boiling point in the order of 40 F. to 20 F., or provide another type of low boiling hydrocarbon. It has become apparent from the results of the present invention that since the pressure at room temperature, about 70 F., exerted is in the order of 75 to 175 pounds per square inch gauge pressure, it is easily understandable that any appreciable temperature elevation would exert a corresponding pressure increase on the container which may exceed the safety limits of most existing containers.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to produce a shaving lather from a reusable shaving cream container which when it emerges from the can is at a temperature of from 125 F. to about 212 F., depending upon the given perimeters that may be engineered by a manufacturer of the device. For this reason, conventional types of propellants are not found to be usable.

A preferred embodiment of the present invention is to use a material at 190 F., and this has been found to be a comfortable temperature for shaving, allowing for heat dissipation during the application of the lather.

It is obvious that any of the heretofore used propellants such as the fluorinated hydrocarbons with a vapor pressure of to 300 pounds per square inch gauge pressure at 70 F., or propane, or any of the previously used hydrocarbons, may not be heated without producing an impediment to safety.

It has been found that a mixture of a suitable liquid soap solution and a propellant comprised of a halogenated alkane with at least two bromine atoms replacing the hydrogen atoms and the remainder of the hydrogen atoms being replaced by other halogen atoms and having a vapor pressure of from about 28 inches of mercury vacuum to about 0 pounds per square inch gauge produces the optimum temperature pressure ratio at 190 F. An example is dibromotetrafiuoroethane which at 190 F has a vapor pressure of about 40 pounds per square inch gauge pressure. This material is relatively non-irritating to the skin, with only a trace of any stinging sensation and then only if left on the face for an extended period. The relatively low corrosive characteristic of dibromotetrafiuoroethane also makes this the preferred propellant where it is to be heated.

The container has many conventional features but also contains a wing nut and nipple arrangement that provides for filling an empty container with the above material, so that the container may be readily reusable in dispensing shaving lather. The container may be made of low quality materials, and if it is to be a long-lasting, replenishable unit, it may be constructed of higher quality materials with a filler opening so that the soap-propellant mixture may be replenished and the unit reused for an indefinite period.

One of the more important features of the improved apparatus is that the dispensing and reusable unit may atent Patented August 16, 1966 comprise a container having an orifice controlled by a valve, an electric element disposed in the can for heating the agents that are to be dispensed by the can, and a relief means that is temperature-responsive to release the internal pressure of the can when the electrical control circuit means that may be applied to the control of the current in the electrical heater element fails or is otherwise inoperable. The relief means is merely a section of the wall that is displaced and releases the internal pressure upon a given application of pressure to the inside walls of the container.

A further and outstanding advantage of the dispensing and reusable unit of the invention is that other agents such as undercoating materials for coating the underside of fenders, and other body portions of automobiles, agents such as sealants, insulating materials, and other similar materials which may require hot application to surface areas by spray units, may be dispensed by the reusable and dispensing unit of the invention. It is important that the dispensing agents, as well as the material to be dispensed, are provided as contents of the container. The container may be repeatedly refilled as the container is expelled of its contents and pressure subsequent to heat being applied by the heater element.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from a detailed description of a particular embodiment of the invention. In the description, reference is made to the accompanying drawings of which:

FIGURE 1 is a partially broken away side elevational view of the thermo dispensing and reusable container being applied to a source of current at a wall plug, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a plan cross-sectional view of the container taken along lines 2 2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a plan cross-sectional view of the heater element taken along lines 3-3 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 4 is an exploded perspective view showing how the container may be refilled and how the container may be applied to a dispensing unit holder or shelf and an electrical plug mounted on a wall, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown a dispensing and reusable unit or container 10 having a recessed bottom 12, a valve assembly 14, and a safety cap 16 made of thermo setting plastic material, which may be of conventional manufacture. The bottom of the container 10 may rest on a shelf or dispensing unit holder 18 that may be constructed of thermo setting plastic material also. There may be provided further tabs 20, 20 disposed about the periphery of the shelf or unit holder 18 for assuring that the container does not slide off. There is further the provision of an electric plug 22 that is mounted on the side of the can and is adapted to be received in a mating plug 24 that is secured from a vertical portion 26 of the holder 18. The vertical portion 26 is seen as being secured to an existing wall 30 and is retained thereupon by screws 32, 32 as applied in any conventional manner. The plug 24 is connected to electric wiring 34 for connection to house current (not shown).

The plug 22 is shown in FIGURES 1 and 3 as being connected to a circularly disposed heating element 38 that is an electrical resistance and designed to dissipate 10 watts, for example, of power. The interior surfaces of the container 10 are provided substantially throughout with insulation layer 40, which layer may be comprised of such material as polyurethane or other insulating type material for retaining the heat in the can, so that if the contents of the can are heated to a temperature of, for

3 example, 195 F. the person who is to use the can may still be able to grasp the can in his hand without difiiculty.

A side of the container 10, preferably the side having the plug 22 mounted therein and the side being positioned adjacent the existing wall 30, contains a release safety tab 44 so that when the internal walls of the can are subjected to a substantial measure of pressure due to the heating element 38 heating the material within the can to an excessive pressure, then the release safety tab 44 is displaced and the pressure of the contents in the can is released without the can or container exploding.

The container is shown in FIGURE 1 to contain material 48. This material may be a mixture of a suitable liquid soap solution and a propellant comprised of a halogenated alkane with at least two bromine atoms replacing the hydrogen atoms and the remainder of the hydrogen atoms being replaced by other halogen atoms and having a vapor pressure of about 28 inches of mercury vacuum to about pounds per square inch gauge, so that there is produced the optimum temperature pressure ratio at 190 F., as a result of the heating element 38 being energized from the house current source. One ex-ample of the propellant is dibromotetrafluoroethane, which is preferred. The propellant is chosen so that it is relatively non-irritating to the skin without more than a trace of stinging sensation and then only if left on the face for an extended period, where the suitable liquid soap is used for the purpose of shaving.

On an upper portion of the container 10, there is disposed a threaded opening 50 and a bolt 52 having a wing nut configuration, as shown in FIGURES 1 and 4. The purpose of the wing nut assembly 52, 54 is that it may be removed from the threaded opening 50 so that when the contents of the container are depleted, the con tainer 10 may be refilled by inserting or injecting additional material from an external source 56, as illustrated in FIGURE 4. The source 56 may have a neck 58 in which the end thereof fits within the Opening 50 so that none of the contents is spilled as the source 56 is applied to the container 10. In this way, the liquid soap solution and propellant mixture, or any other mixture having a propellant therein whether such mixture contains with the propellant an undercoating agent for use and application to undersides of vehicles, sealants, insulating material, and other materials which may require hot application for use on surfaces, refill the container 10. Upon the contents of the container 10 being heated by energization from the electric heater element 38, pressure is developed in the container 10 sufficiently so that the release of the contents by the valve assembly 14 upon manual depression thereof provides a flow of the mixture including the propellant, as is common in aerosol devices, and in which the propellants are heated to a temperature range of between 125 F. to about 212 F. as expelled from the container.

It is possible to provide a temperature control cutoff element in circuit with the plug and wiring 34 as an integral part of the system, or the temperature control cutoff unit may be embodied as part and integral with the container 10 so that a uniform temperature selected between 125 F. to about 212 F. may be used. In this way, the propellant has a vapor pressure from about 28 inches of mercury vacuum to about 30 pounds per square inch gauge pressure at F. until the container becomes empty.

It should be understood that the specific apparatus herein illustrated and described is intended to be representative only as many changes may be made therein without departing from the clear teachings of the invention. Accordingly, reference should be made to the following claims in determining the full scope of the in- Vention.

What is claimed is:

1. A dispensing and reusable unit comprising a container having an orifice controlled by a valve, an electric element positioned within said container having terminals for connection to a source of current terminals for heating the contents of the container to F. to about 212 F., at a vapor pressure from about 28 inches of mercury vacuum to about 0 pounds per square inch gauge pressure at 70 F., a propellant in said container being mixed with a material to be dispensed, said propellant being a halogenated alkane having not more than two carbon atoms and containing at least one bromine atom, and a threaded plug for mating with a threaded orifice to apply additional material to the container when the plug is removed so the container may be refilled when empty, and to insure pressure within the container when the plug is engaging the threaded orifice, and the pressure being maintained therein when the electric heater element is electrically energized and a wall bracket for mounting the container thereon, said source terminals positioned adjacent the wall bracket to cooperate with the terminals on the container when the container is in the wall bracket.

2. The invention according to claim 1 wherein an insulating coating is provided substantially throughout the inner walls of the container.

3. The invention according to claim 1 wherein a safety release tab is provided on a surf-ace of the container and is releasable upon excessive build-up of pressure within the container.

4. The invention according to claim 1 wherein said propellant is dibromotetrafluoroethane.

5. The invention according to claim 1 wherein there is mixed with the propellant a liquid soap solution for use as a shaving soap.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 779,983 1/ 1905 Alexander 222-397 1,537,552 5/1925 Rotunno 222-146 1,889,507 11/1932 Watson 222-146 2,653,130 9/1953 Eiseman 252-8 2,822,961 2/1958 Seaquist 222-397 2,921,897 1/1960 Glendenning 252-81 2,974,214 3/1961 Taniguchi 219-437 3,101,875 8/1963 Michel.

3,137,417 6/1964 Zetterstrom 169-1 X 3,143,636 8/1964 Lupovici 222-146 X 3,144,174 8/1964 Abplanalp 239- X 3,155,292 11/1964 Webster 222-397 3,168,210 2/1965 Williams 222-396 X RAPHAEL M. LUPO, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US779983 *Mar 8, 1904Jan 10, 1905Theophilus W AlexanderDispensing-can.
US1537552 *Feb 7, 1923May 12, 1925Michael RotunnoLather-making device
US1889507 *Aug 8, 1930Nov 29, 1932Thomas WatsonApparatus for spraying paraffin wax and the like
US2653130 *May 17, 1951Sep 22, 1953Du PontFire extinguishing composition of cbrf or cfbrcfbr containing cf as a propellant
US2822961 *Jun 25, 1954Feb 11, 1958Seaquist Nels WAerosol bomb
US2921897 *Jul 23, 1956Jan 19, 1960Graviner Manufacturing CoFire suppressants
US2974214 *Sep 9, 1958Mar 7, 1961Fumio TaniguchiElectrical appliance and support means therefor
US3101875 *Jun 4, 1954Aug 27, 1963Daniel Michel DavidValve and dispensing apparatus for pressure containers and the like
US3137417 *Jul 26, 1962Jun 16, 1964Specialties Dev CorpValve coupling for container confining and dispensing fluid medium under pressure
US3143636 *May 29, 1963Aug 4, 1964David LupoviciHot liquid dispenser
US3144174 *Nov 17, 1961Aug 11, 1964Henry Abplanalp RobertMeans for dispensing heated aerosols
US3155292 *Apr 13, 1962Nov 3, 1964Bernz O Matic CorpSafety valve arrangement for pressurized containers
US3168210 *Dec 28, 1962Feb 2, 1965Williams Gladney RSafety feature in pressurized containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5673731 *May 3, 1996Oct 7, 1997Morton International, Inc.Method and apparatus for filling elongated pressurized fluid containers from the side
US5700991 *Apr 25, 1996Dec 23, 1997Osbern; Lida N.Heating device for heating a gel container received therein
US6415957Nov 27, 2000Jul 9, 2002S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Apparatus for dispensing a heated post-foaming gel
US6454127Aug 17, 2000Sep 24, 2002Sheree SuomelaSelf-contained liquid dispenser with heating means
US6978914Nov 27, 2002Dec 27, 2005S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Valve elements for pressurized containers and actuating elements therefor
US7726409Jun 29, 2006Jun 1, 2010Eclipse Aerospace, Inc.Fire suppression systems
US7757776Jan 12, 2006Jul 20, 2010Eclipse Aerospace, Inc.Fire suppression systems
US7886836Jul 10, 2006Feb 15, 2011Eclipse Aerospace, Inc.Fire suppression systems
USRE40651 *Jul 16, 2004Mar 10, 2009Eclipse Aviation CorporationEnvironmentally friendly; release bromine atoms such as phosphorous tribromide (PBr3), thionyl bromide (SOBr2), boron tribromide (BBr3), and the like are very efficient at extinguishing fires; hydrolyze or oxidize rapidly in troposphere and consequently they have no stratospheric ozone depletion, airbag
USRE41557 *Oct 31, 2008Aug 24, 2010Eclipse Aerospace, Inc.Environmentally friendly; release bromine atoms such as phosphorous tribromide (PBr3), thionyl bromide (SOBr2), boron tribromide (BBr3), and the like are very efficient at extinguishing fires; hydrolyze or oxidize rapidly in troposphere and consequently they have no stratospheric ozone depletion; airbags
USRE41558 *Oct 31, 2008Aug 24, 2010Eclipse Aerospace, Inc.Environmentally friendly; release bromine atoms such as phosphorous tribromide (PBr3), thionyl bromide (SOBr2), boron tribromide (BBr3), and the like are very efficient at extinguishing fires; hydrolyze or oxidize rapidly in troposphere and consequently they have no stratospheric ozone depletion; airbags
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/146.5, 222/396, 222/180, 222/397, 141/3, 222/394, 239/135, 219/214, 219/437, 222/146.1
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/72
European ClassificationB65D83/72