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Publication numberUS3266686 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1966
Filing dateAug 25, 1965
Priority dateAug 25, 1965
Publication numberUS 3266686 A, US 3266686A, US-A-3266686, US3266686 A, US3266686A
InventorsGriffith John E
Original AssigneeGriffith John E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible pack and chair
US 3266686 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1966 J. E. GRIFFITH 3,266,686

CONVERTIBLE PACK AND CHAIR Filed Aug. 25, 1965 INYENTOR LIBHN E. GRIFFITH BY d 34 WoRfiEY r filhhfihti Ce Patented August 16, 1966 3,266,686 CONVERTIBLE PAQK AND CHAIR John E. Griflith, 618 Elm Ave., South Pittsburg, Tenn. Filed Aug. 25, 1965, Ser. No. 482,560 8 Claims. (Cl. 224-3?) This invention relates to a convertible pack and chair, and more particularly to a combination pack and chair, in which no dis-assembly of parts is required for the conversion of the pack to the chair, or vice versa.

One object of this invention is to provide a convertible pack and chair in which the pack sack is secured and concealed beneath the seat frame member when the device is in the chair position.

Another object of this invention is to provide a convertible pack and chair having a back frame member and a seat frame pivotally connected to the back frame member for relative pivotal movement between a pack position and a chair position.

Another object of this invention is to provide a combination pack and chair in which the pack sack is supported to ride high on the back of a person, when in pack position.

Another object of this invention is to provide a convertible pack and chair provided with simple and efficient means for securing the seat frame member and the back frame member in both the pack position and the chair position.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the invention in pack position; and

FIG. 2 is an opposite side elevation of the invention shown in FIG. 1, in chair position.

Referring now to the drawings in more detail, the combination pack and chair, which will hereinafter be referred to as a pack-chair 10, is shown in its two fully converted positions, as a pack frame in FIG. 1 and as a chair in FIG. 2.

The pack chair 10 comprises essentially a back frame member 12, a seat frame member 13, a pivotally connecting link bar 14 and a pack or pack sack 15. The seat frame member 13 may be provided with depending leg members 17 and 18, shown as U-shaped leg supports in the drawings, for supporting the seat frame 13 upon the supporting surface such as the ground or a floor, not shown. Of course, it is Within the scope of this invention to eliminate the legs 17 and 18 if the pack 15 were made of rigid material, such as aluminum or hard plastic,

in which event, the pack itself would provide the necessary support for the seat frame 13 in the chair position disclosed in FIG. 2.

The leg members 17 and 18 also provide a rigid frame for supporting the pack 15 in pack position between the seat frame member 13 and the back frame member 12, when in the pack position as disclosed in FIG. 1.

Although the back frame member 12 is subject to considerable latitude in construction, it is principally a substantially planer member suitable to function as a backrest in the chair position of FIG. 2, and to function as a forward frame member for the pack 15 and a back-support for the person carrying the pack, in the pack position of FIG. 1. In the drawings, the back frame member 12 comprises an inverted U-shaped frame 20 preferably of light-weight material, such as aluminum tubing, and secured at its lower ends by a bottom transverse rod 21. This substantially rectangular frame 20-21 may be covered with any suitable panel material, such as the flexible webbing 22. The upper transverse end of the back frame 20 may be covered with padding 23 if desired, to provide a comfortable support for the shoulders in pack position, and comfortable head-rest in chair position. The shoulder straps 25 of any desired construction, may be secured in any convenient manner to the front side of the back frame member 12, so that the pack chair It may be supported in pack position by the back and shoulders of the wearer.

Seat frame member 13 is also permitted considerable latitude in construction so long as it functions as a seat in the chair position (FIG. 2) and as the rear portion of a pack frame to support the pack 15 in pack position (FIG. 1). The drawings disclose seat frame member 13 constructed substantially the same as the back frame member 12. The seat frame member 13 also includes a U-shaped tubular frame 27, preferably of aluminum, secured at its rear end by the transverse rod 28. The substantially rectangular frame formed by the members 27 and 28 is covered by any convenient panel material, such as the flexible webbing 29, shown in the drawings. Also, as shown in the drawings, the side portions of the leg members 17 and 18 depend normal to and are in the same plane as the side portions of the U-shaped seat frame 27. The leg members 17 and 18 are, of course, of equal size so that they will support the seat frame 13 in a level position upon a level surface.

As shown in the drawings, the pack 15 is in the form of a pack-sack made of canvas or heavy duck material and is of such size as to be fully contained between the seat frame member 13 and the leg members 17 and 18. The pack 15 may be secured to the seat frame 27 by means of straps such as 30, and also to the leg member 17, by means of straps such as 31.

A link bar 14 is provided on each side of the pack chair 10, each link bar 14 being identical in construction. Each end of the link bar 14 is forked to provide double ears to pass on either side of and receive the respective side portions of the back frame 20 and the seat frame 27. One forked end 34 of the link bar 14 is pivotally connected to the rear end 39 of the side portion of the frame 27 by a pivot pin 35. The other forked end 36 of the link bar 14 is pivotally connected to the side portion of the frame 20 by means of a pivot pin 37.

Although the end 34 of the link bar 14 is shown pivotally connected directly to the rear end 39 of the seat frame member 13, the link bar end 34 may be pivoted at points on the seat frame member 13 spaced forwardly of the rear end 39, so long as the distance between the pivot pin 35 and the rear end 39 is less than the length of the link bar 14. The reason for this critical spacing is that the seat member 13 must pivot about the pivot pin 37 and through the plane of the link bar 14 in either direction in order to swing between the chair position disclosed in FIG. 2 and the pack position disclosed in FIG. 1.

Although not critical to the operation of the invention, if the distance between the pivot pin 37 and the lower end 41} of the back frame member 12 is greater than the distance between the pivot pin 37 and the top of the seat frame member 13 when the link bar 14 is perpendicular to the seat frame member 13, then the bottom 40 of the back frame member 12 will be prevented from swinging rearwardly past the plane of the link bar 14. Thus, by having the lower portion of the back frame member 12 from the pivot pin 37 to the bottom end 40 substantially as long as or longer than the link bar 14, greater stability will be afforded the pack chair 10 in its chair position disclosed in FIG. 2.

In order to connect the back frame member 12 and seat frame member 13 and to sustain them in their pack and chair positions, an elognated flexible member, such as the chain 42, is connected at its upper end by an eyebolt 43 to the upper portion of the back frame 12, and is then threaded through another eye-bolt 44 fixed to the side edge of the forward portion of the seat frame memher 13. The chain 42 is sufiiciently long that when it is in its extended position disclosed in FIG. 2, it may be fastened to the eye-bolt 44 to provide additional support for sustaining the back frame member 12 and the seat frame member 13 in the chair position. When the pack chair is converted to the pack position disclosed in FIG. 1, the chain 42 may be pulled tight through the eye-bolt 44 and tied or otherwise secured to hold the seat frame member 13 and the back frame member 12.

Another device employed for securing the back frame member 12 to the seat frame member 13 in chair position disclosed in FIG. 2, is the hook 45 which may be threaded or otherwise secured into the top of the side rail of the seat frame 27 so that the hook 45 is pointing rearwardly. The hook 45 should be positioned at a point spaced forwardly of the rear end 39 of the frame member 13 where the hook will engage the bottom end 40 of the seat frame member 12 in the desired chair position. As best disclosed in FIG. 1, an aperture 46 is formed in the front surface adjacent the bot-tom end 40 to receive the pointed end of the hook 45 and thus prevent the bottom end 40 of back frame member 12 from sliding or pivoting forwardly or laterally, but which may easily be removed by pivoting the bottom end 40 rearwardly about the pivot pin 37, when it is desired to convert the pack-chair 10 to a pack.

The chains 42 and the eye-bolts 43 and 44, the hook 45 and aperture 46, as Well as the link bar 14, are duplicated on both sides of the pack-chair 10, as shown in the opposite side views in FIGS. 1 and 2.

With the parts of the pack-chair 10 thus described, the operation will be easily understood. Assuming that the pack-chair 10 is in the chair position disclosed in FIG. 2, the pack sack is secured by the straps 30 and 31 to the seat frame 27 and leg member 17, the bottom ends are held by the hooks engaging the apertures 46, and the chains 42 are stretched taut and tied to the eye-bolts 43 and 44.

When it is desired to convert the pack sack 10 from the chair position disclosed in FIG. 2 to the pack position discolsed in FIG. 1, the chains 42 are released from the eye-bolts 44, and the back frame member 12 is pivoted slightly counter-clockwise about the pivot pin 37 to release the hooks 45 from the apertures 46. This operation may also be assisted by pivoting the link bar 14 clockwise slightly about the pivot pin 35. Assuming that the back frame member 12 is maintained in substantially the position disclosed in FIG. 2, and it is released from the seat member 13, the seat frame member 13 is pivoted counterclockwise about the pivot pin 35 through more than 180 and approaching 270. The link bar 14 is also pivoted counter-clockwise about the pivot pin 37 until it is substantially normal to the back frame member 12, and the seat frame member 13 is pivoted until it is substantially parallel to the back frame member 12 so that the back frame member 12, link bar 14 and seat frame member 13 and pack sack 15 will occupy the position disclosed in FIG. 1. If the chain 42 is not substantially long enough to remain in the eye-bolt 44 during this swinging movement, then the chain 42 is again threaded through the eye-bolt 44 and tightened and tied in the position disclosed in FIG. 1. The excess length of chain 42 may be deposited in the top of the pack sack 15 as shown.

In the pack position, additional stability is obtained by the rear side portions of the rear leg member 18 resting on the adjacent flat surfaces of the link bars 14, as shown in FIG. 1. The rear leg member 18 may be tied against the link bar 14, if desired, by means of the thong 50.

The shoulder straps 25 are then thrown over the shoulders of the wearer and adjusted to the most comfortable position, and the conversion from chair to pack is then complete.

It will be noted in FIG. 1 that the structural arrangement of the back frame member 12, seat frame member 13 and link bars 14 are such that the pack sack 15 is supported against the upper portion of the backside of the back frame member 12, so that the pack 15 and the entire pack frame will ride high on the shoulders of the wearer, which is the recommended and most comfortable position for carrying a pack.

When it is desired to convert the pack sack 10 from a pack to a chair, the reverse operation is effected. The shoulder straps are removed from the wearer, the chain 42 is removed, and if the thong 50 is used, it is untied. The seat frame member 13 is then pivoted back through its to 270 turn about the pivot pins 35, and then the seat frame member 13 and link bars 14 are pivoted about the pivot pins 37 to cause the seat frame member 13 to pivot beneath the bottom ends 40 clearing the hooks 45. The link bars 14 and the back frame member 12 are then manuevered until the hooks 45 engage the apertures 46. If desired, although not always necessary, the chains 42 may be tightened and secured to the eye-bolts 44. In this manner, the elements are properly related and secured in stable position to provide a comfortable chair.

Moreover, as viewed in FIG. 2, the pack sack 15 is adequately held Without damage, while being concealed beneath the seat frame member 13. Moreover, since the top of the pack sack 15 is disposed beneath the front of the seat frame member 13, the contents of the pack sack 15 are readily accessible from the front of the chair without removing the pack sack 15 from its secured position between the legs i17 and 18.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, and therefore the invention is not limited by that which is shown in the drawings and described in the specification, but only as indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A convertible pack and chair comprising:

(a) an elongated back frame member haw'ng a front side and a back side and an upper end and a lower end,

(b) an elongated seat frame member having a top side and a bottom side and a rear end and a front end,

(c) a link bar having a first end and a second end,

(d) first means for pivotally connecting said first end to said seat frame member at a point adjacent said rear end, the distance between said first end and said rear end being less than the length of said link bar,

(e) second means for pivotally connecting said second end to said back frame member at a point spaced from said lower end,

(f) a pack,

(g) means for securing said pack to the bottom side of said seat frame member,

(h) means for securing said seat frame member to said back frame member in pack position with said pack between the bottom side of said seat frame member and the back side of said back frame memher,

(i) shoulder strap means for securing the front side of said back frame member upon the back of a person, and

(j) means for securing said back frame member to said seat frame member in chair position with the lower end of said back frame member between said front end and said first pivotal connecting means.

2. The invention according to claim 1 in which the distance between said second pivotal connecting means and said lower end of said back frame member is at least as great as the distance between said second pivotal connecting means and the top side of said seat frame member when said link bar is normal to the plane of said seat frame member.

3. The invention according to claim 1 further comprising leg members depending from the bottom side of said seat frame member adapted to suport said convertible pack and chair in chair position, said pack being contained between said leg members.

4. The invention according to claim 1 in which said means for securing said seat frame member to said back frame member in pack position comprises a flexible lineal member connecting the upper portion of said back frame member above said second pivotal connecting means to the forward portion of said seat frame member.

5. The invention according to claim 4 in which said flexible lineal member is long enough to be extended to connect said forward portion of said seat frame memher and said upper portion of said back frame member in chair position.

6. The invention according to claim :1 in which said means for securing said back frame member to said seat frame member in chair position comprises a stop member extending upwardly from the top side of said seat frame member for engagement with said lower end of said back frame member,

7. The invent-ion according to claim 6 in which said stop member comprises a hook extending upwardly from said top side of said seat frame member and pointing References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 5/1919 Janczyk 224-6 3/1961 Beardsley 2249 References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,480,402 8/ 1949 Elston. 2,490,367 12/ 1949 Maddocks. 2,843,185 7/1958 Clem et al. 2,915,154 12/1959 Holder. 3,062,583 11/1962 Hamilton.

GERALD M. FORLENZA, Primary Examiner.

W. F, WERNER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1302927 *Oct 5, 1918May 6, 1919 Peter tomasik admiitisteator of said
US2480402 *Feb 21, 1947Aug 30, 1949William H ElstonConvertible boat chair and carrier
US2490367 *Dec 19, 1944Dec 6, 1949Maddocks William MichaelFolding chair
US2843185 *May 5, 1955Jul 15, 1958Bill ClemConvertible pack sack and camp stool frame
US2915154 *Mar 26, 1958Dec 1, 1959Holder Lorrain ACombination seat and carrying bag
US2973888 *Jun 30, 1958Mar 7, 1961Herbert Beardsley HaroldConvertible camp cots
US3062583 *Nov 30, 1959Nov 6, 1962Hamilton Cosco IncInfant's car seat and crib
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3828992 *Aug 7, 1972Aug 13, 1974Cerchione JFolding cot pack
US3990536 *May 21, 1975Nov 9, 1976Wilburn James BPortable enclosure
US4286739 *Jul 6, 1979Sep 1, 1981Potomac Applied MechanicsConvertible back pack frame
US4487345 *Dec 27, 1982Dec 11, 1984Pierce Mel PBackpack chair
US4720029 *Aug 8, 1986Jan 19, 1988Varanakis John EFolding chair/backpack
US5016792 *Feb 21, 1990May 21, 1991Jay John CBackpack convertible chair
US5031811 *Jan 8, 1990Jul 16, 1991Emilien CharestConvertible chair and load carrier device
US5131575 *Jun 20, 1991Jul 21, 1992Emilien CharestConvertible chair and load carrier device
US5209381 *May 17, 1991May 11, 1993Jay John CBackpack convertible chair
US5390839 *Jun 7, 1993Feb 21, 1995Peters; FrancisCombination decoy carrier and dog stand
US5460307 *Jul 12, 1993Oct 24, 1995Stevenson; Bruce E.Convertible backpack and wheeled cargo bed
US5499760 *May 5, 1994Mar 19, 1996Pielocik; William P.Interconvertible backpack and chair apparatus
US5501505 *Sep 7, 1994Mar 26, 1996Jablonski; DavidShoulder straps for beach chair
US5527089 *Feb 24, 1995Jun 18, 1996Charest; EmilienConvertible chair and load carrier device
US5588696 *Jun 29, 1995Dec 31, 1996Jay; John C.Convertible chair with armrests which converts to a backpack
US5779112 *Apr 29, 1997Jul 14, 1998United States Luggage, L.P.Back pack with seat
US5957349 *May 13, 1998Sep 28, 1999United States Luggage, L.P.Luggage with seat
US5975389 *Oct 14, 1997Nov 2, 1999Braun; Joel L.Backpack with extendable sub-frame
US6345862Mar 1, 2000Feb 12, 2002Larry D. MeinburgConvertible backpack chair
US7052080 *Mar 28, 2003May 30, 2006David Perry KnightFrame for supporting a back pack and providing a seat structure
US20110259934 *Apr 27, 2011Oct 27, 2011O'ryan Timothy JosephTree stand and gear carrying system
WO1986000506A1 *Jul 8, 1985Jan 30, 1986Frosta Fritid AbCarrying system, preferably for rucksacks
Classifications
U.S. Classification224/155
International ClassificationA45F4/02, A45F4/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45F4/02
European ClassificationA45F4/02