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Publication numberUS3267206 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1966
Filing dateJan 14, 1964
Priority dateJan 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3267206 A, US 3267206A, US-A-3267206, US3267206 A, US3267206A
InventorsLeonard Jr Harold C
Original AssigneePerformance Insulator Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulator cap and line clamp assembly
US 3267206 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1966 H. c. LEONARD, JR

INSULATOR CAP AND LINE CLAMP ASSEMBLY Filed Jan. 14, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR HAROLD (LLEOIYARD TR.

BY JM,%M+M

ATTORNEYS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 16, 1966 H c. LEONARD, JR

INSULATOR CAP AND LINE CLAMP ASSEMBLY Filedv Jan. 14, 1964 IIIII III mfi mw Mo.

' INVENTOR HAROLD CLEONARD, JR-

BY Ja /0%, 720% M ATTORNEYS- -N J mm i S.

id 5. on

16, 1966 H. c. LEONARD, JR 3,267,206

INSULATOR CAP AND LINE CLAMP ASSEMBLY Filed Jan. 14, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 m4 132 I I34 I 43 j .27. 9s

125 I22 INVENTOR meow mm, JR.

O8 'BY JM, W9 M ATTORNEYS 'those turning an angle at the pole.

United States Patent O 3,267,206 DISULATOR (JAP AND LINE CLAMP ASSEMBLY Harold C. Leonard, .Ir., Jackson, Miss., assignor to Rerformance Insulator, Inc., Jackson, Miss., a corporation of Mississippi Filed Jan. 14, 1%4, Ser. No. 337,571 3 Claims. (Cl. 174-169) This invention relates to novel insulator cap and line clamp assemblies for supporting conductors from insulators.

:Copending United States application Serial No. 249,813 filed January 7, 1963, by Harold C. Leonard and Vardaman K. Smith for Distribution System (now Patent No. 3,145,259) discloses a novel electrical distribution system in which the utility pole supported cross arms on which the primary conductors are carried in the conventional overhead system are replaced by a pair of insulators mounted directly on each utility pole in back-to-back relationship adjacent its upper end and a third insulator extending above and also fixed directly to the pole. A number of advantages are obtained from this system including a more attractive appearance, greater climbing space, increased capacity, and other advantages.

One problem encountered in armless distribution systems is that the conventional insulator cap and line clamp assemblies heretofore used to support the conductors from the insulators have generally proved to be unsatisfactory. One highly undesirable characteristic of the conventional assembly is its great susceptibility to corrosion. As is shown in US. Design Patent No. 194,357, for example, conventional assemblies include a generally U-shaped galvanized bracket with two horizontally aligned nipples which pivotally support the conductor attached member of the clamp. The protective galvanized coating is rapidly worn off these nipples by the rocking movement of the conductor supporting clamp members; and the nipples therefore quickly corrode and fail, often requiring the assemblies to be replaced within a few months after they are first installed.

Other important disadvantages of conventional insulator-cap-line clamp assemblies are that they lack versatility, have inadequate holding ability, are inconvenient to use, and, in comparison to the novel insulator cap-line clamp assemblies disclosed in the present invention, are relatively weak.

An important object of the present invention therefore is the provision of novel insulator cap and line clamp assemblies which are highly resistant to wear and corrosion, inexpensive and attractive, and capable of securely supporting heavy conductors subject to vibration.

Another important object of this invention, in view of the lack of versatility of the heretofore available insulator cap and line clamp assemblies, is the provision of novel insulator cap and line clamp assemblies in which the same clamp may be used to support both conductors extending in a straight line past a pole and In its preferred embodiment, my novel insulator cap and line clamp assembly, which has the foregoing advantages, includes an insulator cap (a separate member or an integral portion of the insulator) including an elongated stud on which the conductor supporting saddle of my novel line clamp is rotatably journalled, permitting ice the clamp to turn freely on the stud. This is an important feature of the present invention as it facilitates attachment of the conductor to the clamp. Also, this arrangement permits relative movement between the clamp and the insulator, preventing damage to the latter which would otherwise be caused by vibrations or galloping of the conductor, for example.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention also includes a clamp having a novel conductor supporting saddle which can be supported on the end cap stud in either of two alternate positions. In one of these positions, the saddle is adapted to securely support a conductor extending straight through the clamp and straight past the structure at which the clamp is located (structures carrying conductors which extend in a straight line past the structure are known as tangent structures). In the other position, attained by reversing the clamp on the stud, the clamp securely supports a conductor turning an angle at the structure at which the clamp is located (structures carrying conductors which turn an angle at the structure are known as angle structures). This is another extremely important feature of the present invention since it cuts in half the different types of clamps which must be carried in inventory and, also, results in a much simpler and more inexpensively manufactured clamp.

In addition to the specific advantages discussed in the preceding paragraph, the novel insulator and line clamp assemblies of the present invention have an improved esthetic appearance and are materially less susceptible to wear and corrosion than previously known insulator cap and line clamp assemblies. Another, extremely important advantage of the novel insulator cap-line clamp assemblies disclosed herein is that they are particularly adapted to support large conductors with heavy insulation, being far superior to conventional assemblies in this respect.

Other objects and further novel features of the present invention Will become more fully apparent from the appended claims and as the ensuing detailed description and discussion proceds in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view of an insulator equipped with an insulator cap and line clamp assembly constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention and assembled for use with an angle structure;

FIGURE 2 is a diagrammatic plan view of an electrical distribution system with an angle structure;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 1, but with the assembly assembled for use with a tangent structure;

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic plan view of an electrical distribution system with a tangent structure;

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of the line clamp;

FIGURE 6 is a front view of the line clamp; and

FIGURE 7 is a right-hand end view of the line clamp.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, insulator cap and line clamp assembly 50 includes, as mentioned above, an insulator cap 52 and a line clamp 54 assembled by a washer 56 and a cap screw 58. Insulator cap 52 is of unitary construction and includes a cap portion 83, a clamp supporting stud 90, and a lifting eye 92.

Cap portion 88 is hollow and has the configuration of a spherical segment. In the illustrated embodiment, lifting eye 92 extends from cap portion 88. This is not critical, however; and the eye can be located in any de sired position on the cap portion or stud 90 or can be formed as a separate member and attached to the end of the stud or to any other part of insulator 28.

Stud 90 has an elongated cylindrical configuration and, with insulator 28 assembled to pole 22, has a slight upward inclination. A drilled and tapped aperture 96 in the outer end of stud 90 receives cap screw 58.

The commercial version of cap 52 is made of aluminum, but other metals, plastics, or still other types of materials may be used, if desired. Cap 52 is secured to the end of insulator 28 in any desired manner. Or, if desired, the cap may be formed as an integral portion of the insulating component 97 of insulator 28. 7

Referring now to FIGURES -7, line clamp 54 includes a clamp member 98 and a keeper 100 secured to the clamp member by screws 102 and washers 104. Clamp member 98 has a main body portion 106 in which a circular bore 108 is formed. As shown in FIGURE 1, with insulator cap 52 and line clamp 54 assembled, stud 90 extends through bore 108; and one end of the clamp body portion 106 abuts a flat surface 110 milled or otherwise formed on the outer end of cap portion 88 around and adjacent the base of stud 90. The opposite end of the clamp main body portion 106 abuts washer 56 so that the washer and surface 110 cooperate to prevent longitudinal movement of clamp 54 relative to insulator cap 52. However, clamp 54 is free to rotate around stud 90 which is highly desirable since this facilitates insertion of the conductor in the clamp and prevents vibrating or other movement of the conductor from damaging the insulator structure.

Line clamp member 98, which is of unitary construction, also includes a novel integral line supporting saddle 112 comprised of two saddle portions or wings 114 and 116 extending in opposite directions from the clamp member main body portion 106 in a direction generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of bore 108. Wings 114 and 116 of saddle 112 have generally semicircular upper surfaces 118 and 120 which match the external configuration of the normal circular conductor.

As shown in FIGURE 7, upper surfaces 118 and 120 of wings 114 and 116 are so oriented that, with clamp 54 horizontal, these surfaces are inclined downwardly and toward the same end of clamp member 98. This is an extremely important feature of the present invention as will become apparent from the ensuing paragraphs of the detailed description of this invention.

Referring first to FIGURES l and 2, clamp 50 may be assembled on insulator cap 52 with the end 122 of clamp member 98 abutting the flat surface 110 of insulator cap 52. Thus assembled, the upper surfaces 118 and 120 of clamp member wings 114 and 116 are adapted to properly support and fixedly secure to the insulator a conductor 24a or 2412 making a turn at the insulator. In other words, assembled in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 1, end cap and line clamp assembly 50 is adapted to be used with an angle structure such as that shown in FIGURE 2 and identified by reference character 124.

Turning now to FIGURES 3 and 4, it will be noted that line clamp 54 has been reversed on stud 90 so that the end 125 of clamp member 98 abuts the flat surface 110 of insulator cap 88 and the opposite end of the clamp member, 122, abuts washer 56. The upper conductor supporting surfaces 118 and 120 of the clamp member conductor supporting saddle 112 are, as is apparent from FIGURE 3, now so oriented that the supporting surface will properly support a conductor extending in a straight line past insulator 28. In other words, with end cap and line clamp assembly 50 assembled as shown in FIG- URE 3, it may be employed with a tangent structure such as that shown in FIGURE 4 and identified by reference character 128.

Thus, the same assembly 50 can be used with both tangent and angle structures. Heretofore, it was necessary to employ two different types of assemblies, depending upon whether the assembly was to be used with a tangent or an angle structure. It will be apparent, therefore, that the novel end cap and line clamp assembly of the present invention permits a 50% reduction in the types of line clamps which must be carried in inventory, substantially reducing inventory expenses. At the same time, a material simplification in the construction of such assemblies is attained.

As is best shown in FIGURE 7, the keeper employed with clamp member 98 has a main body portion with flanges 132 and 134 extending in opposite d-irections therefrom. A conductor contacting groove 136 in body portion 130 permits the conductor to be firmly clamped in saddle 112 of clamp member 98 without damage to the conductor. above extend through washers 104 and apertures 137 in the two flanges 132 and 1.34 of keeper 100 into drilled and tapped apertures 138 in the main body portion 106 of clamp member 98, fixing the keeper to the clamp member and securing the conductor in place so that it cannot move relative to line clamp 54.

Several modification-s which may be made in insulator cap and line clamp assembly 50 without exceeding the scope of the present invention have been discussed above. It will apparent from the foregoing, however, that still other modifications may readily be made. For example, the combination of bolt 102 and washer 104 can be replaced with -a bolt having a large flange adjacent the head. As a further example, main body portion. 106 of clamp 98 may be formed so that the stud contacting portion is a ring or merely a curved surface, it being only essential that the arrangement be one which restrains all but rotative movement of the clamp relative tothe stud. These and other such modifications are, therefore, to be understood as being within the scope of the present invention.

It will also be obvious that the present invention is not limited to the particular illustrated configuration of posttype insulators, but may be employed with post-type insulators of widely varying configuration. Also, the present invention is not limited in applicability to the armless distribution system described above, but may be utilized in any circumstance Where an adjustable insulator or insulator cap and line clamp assembly can be advantageously employed.

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing trom the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiment is therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exelusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An insulator cap and line clamp assembly for use in electrical distribution and like systems, comprising: an insulator cap having a cap portion in the form of a hollow spherical segment and an elongated, cylindrical clamp supporting stud extending therefrom at an angle to the axis of revolution of said segment; a conductor supporting line clamp having a cylindrical bore therethrough, said stud extending through said bore; and means detachably fixed to said stud for preventing relative rectilinear move-- ment between said clamp and said stud.

2. The assembly as defined in claim 1, wherein said clamp includes a clamp member of unitary construction having: a main body portion with said bore formed therein; and a conductor supporting saddle including a pair of wing portions extending in opposite directions The cap screws 102 mentioned 5 6 from said main body portion, said wing portions being References Cited by the Examiner inclined downwardly relative to the top of the main body FOREIGN PATENTS pontion and being inclined toward the same end of said 562,116 8/1923 Fmnce. mem body .portion, thereby adapting said clamp for use 6 822,379 9/1937 Frame. with both tangent and angle stnuebures. 3 5 1 1921 Germany.

3. The assembly as defined in claim 2, together with 6,183 10/ 1921 Holland. a keeper and means for detiachlab-ly fixing said keeper to the main body portion of the clamp member to fix LARAMIE ASKIN Primary Examiner a eonduetor in said saddle. 10 ROBERT K. SCHAELFER, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
DE332256C *Jan 27, 1921Elektrotechnische Ind Ges M BSenkrecht stehender Stuetzisolator fuer Stromleitungsschienen
FR562116A * Title not available
FR822379A * Title not available
NL6183C * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4579306 *Aug 2, 1984Apr 1, 1986Kellett K CraigeTransmission wire clamp
US5064971 *Oct 13, 1989Nov 12, 1991Bogdanow Anatol LDevice for fastening an electrical cable to an insulator
US5837943 *Nov 19, 1993Nov 17, 1998Kellett; E. GlennElectrical power line insulator with universal end clamp
US7946547Dec 29, 2008May 24, 2011Hubbell IncorporatedUniversal clamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/169, 24/115.00R
International ClassificationH01B17/14, H01B17/16, H02G7/20
Cooperative ClassificationH01B17/16, H02G7/20
European ClassificationH02G7/20, H01B17/16