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Publication numberUS3267859 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 23, 1966
Filing dateFeb 18, 1964
Priority dateFeb 18, 1964
Publication numberUS 3267859 A, US 3267859A, US-A-3267859, US3267859 A, US3267859A
InventorsJutila Sakari T
Original AssigneeJutila Sakari T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid dielectric pump
US 3267859 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 23, 1966 s. T. JUTILA 3,267,859

LIQUID DIELECTRIC PUMP Filed Feb. 18, 1964 OOOOOOOO NV NTOR. .ym g 7*. 51/7/44 United States Patent 3,267,859 LIQUID DIELECTRIC PUMP Sakari T. Jutila, Lafayette, N.Y., assignor t0 the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Air Force Filed Feb. 18, 1964, Ser. No. 345,812 4 Claims. (Cl. 1031) This invention relates generally to pumps and more particularly to an improved liquid dielectric pump.

Liquid flow is induced in a liquid dielectricpump by placing a direct current potential between a pair of electrodes immersed in a dielectric liquid. Heretofore, the pumping rate of this type pump has been, in some instances, lower than desired. Now it is known that if an electrically charged conducting surface has a relatively sharp point, a large part of the charge will concentrate at the point to produce a non-uniform electric field having a high electrostatic stress immediately surrounding the point. The invented pump herein, utilizes the aforementioned principle for improved performance.

Thus, it is an object of this invention to improve the performance of liquid dielectric pumps.

It is an object of this invention to induce dielectric liquid flow by non-uniform electric fields causing dielectric deformations and/or by actions of dielectric inhomogeneities in non-uniform electric fields.

Another object is to provide a dielectric pump utilizing an electrode with a plurality of points to produce a nonuniform electric field.

A further object is to provide a liquid dielectric pump which is economical to produce and which utilizes conventional, currently available materials that lend themselves to standard mass production manufacturing techniques.

Other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention may be had by referring to the following description and claims, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 represents a schematic cross-section of the invented pump;

FIGURE 2 is a schematic enlargement of a portion of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 represents a schematic plan view of a pump electrode having sharp points;

FIGURE 4 is a cross-section of FIGURE 3 taken along lines IVIV;

FIGURE 5 is a schematic plan view of a dielectric barrier disk;

FIGURE 6 is a cross-section of FIGURE 5 taken along lines VI-VI;

FIGURE 7 is a schematic plan view of an opposing electrode disk;

FIGURE 8 is a cross-section of FIGURE 7 taken along lines VIIIVIII; and

FIGURE 9 is an alternate cross-section of FIGURE 7 taken along lines IX-IX.

Referring to the figures, wherein like numerals refer to like parts, the pump casing 10 is a cylinder fabricated of a non-conducting material, for example, glass or a plastic. Liquid flow through the pump is in the direction of the arrows from an inlet 14 toward an outlet 18 which are provided at the opposite ends of the cylindrical casing 10, as indicated in FIGURE 1.

A first electrode disk 20 is provided within casing 10 at a transverse position between inlet 14 and outlet 18, normal to the indicated direction of flow. Perforations 24 through disk 20 are streamlined, as illustrated, to facilitate flow therethrough. The uniform pattern of FIG- URE 3 is formed by a plurality of points 26 protruding from between perforations 24 in the direction of flow from inlet 14 toward outlet 18.

Patented August 23, 1966 A second electrode disk 30 is spaced parallel to disk 20 with surfaces at 32 spaced opposite to points 26, as shown at FIGURES 1 and 2. Flow toward outlet 18 through disk 30 is provided for by a plurality of streamlined perforations 34. The distribution pattern of perforations in the disks 20 and 30 may be identical for the alignment of perforations 24 and 34 directly opposite to each other, thereby assuring that each point 26 is opposed by a surface 32. Both electrodes 20 and 39 may be formed of a thin sheet or punched out of a solid metal as indicated by the cross-sections of FIGURES 8 and 9, respectively. v

A barrier disk 40, of a non-conducting material, is positioned at a parallel position between disks 20 and 30. The plurality of conical shaped pressure orifices 44 provides for flow through the barrier disk 40. The distribution of orifices 44 coincides with that of the points 26 enabling each point 26 to protrude into an orifice 44, as illustrated.

Electrical conductors 50, 51, connect the electrodes 20, 30 to a source of direct current potential. As indicated, the electrode 20 is connected to the positive terminal.

During operation, the pump is filled with a dielectric liquid and a direct current potential applied to the electrodes 20 and 30. Electrode 20 is kept positive with respect to electrode 30 to avoid high-field induced breakdown, since experiments have indicated that dielectric breakdown occurs more readily if electrode 20 is negative. The barrier disk 40 with the conical shaped pressure orifices 44 encompassing points 26, tends to trap and concentrate pressure and give direction to the flow thereby improving performance of the liquid dielectric pump. Since maximum pressures obtainable by the invented pump are limited by the dielectric strength of the liquids pumped, the separation of points 26 from barrier 40 and surfaces 32 are optimized for flow at a safe field of op- Y eration.

Although the invention has been described with reference to a particular embodiment, it will be understood to those skilled in the art that the invention is capable of a variety of alternative embodiments within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim: 7

1. A liquid dielectric pump comprising: a casing having an inlet and an outlet for liquid flow therethrough; a pair of spaced parallel grid electrodes within said casing between said inlet and outlet, one of said electrodes having a plurality of points protruding in direction of said flow from said inlet toward said outlet, and other of said electrodes defining surfaces spaced opposite to said points; a non-conducting barrier between said electrodes, said barrier having for said flow therethrough a plurality of pressure orifices into which said points protrude; and electrical conductors connecting said electrodes to a source of electrical potential.

2. A liquid dielectric pump comprising: a casing having an inlet and an outlet for liquid flow therethrough; a pair of spaced parallel grid electrodes within said casing at a position normal to said flow between said inlet and outlet, one of said electrodes having a plurality of points protruding in direction of said flow from said inlet toward said outlet, and other of said electrodes defining surfaces spaced opposite to said points; a non-conducting barrier between said electrodes, said barrier having for said fiow therethrough a plurality of pressure orifices into which said points protrude; and electrical conductors connecting said electrodes to a source of electrical potential.

3. A liquid dielectric pump comprising: a casing having an inlet and an outlet for liquid flow therethrough; a first electrode within said casing at a transverse position normal to said flow between said inlet and outlet, said electrode having a plurality of perforations and a plurality of points protruding from between said perforations in direction of said flow from said inlet toward said outlet; a second electrode spaced parallel to said first electrode and defining surfaces spaced opposite to said points, said second electrode having perforations aligned with said perforations of said first electrode for said flow therethrough; a non-conducting barrier between said electrodes, said barrier having for said flow therethrough a plurality of shaped pressure orifices into which said points protrude; and electrical conductors connecting said electrodes to a source of electrical potential.

4. A liquid dielectric pump comprising: a cylindrical casing of non-conducting material having at opposite ends, respectively, an inlet and an outlet for liquid flow therethrough; a first electrode disk within said casing at a transverse position normal to said flow between said inlet and outlet, said disk having a plurality of streamlined perforations and a plurality of points protruding from between said perforations in direction of said flow from said inlet toward said outlet; a second electrode disk spaced parallel to said first disk and defining surfaces spaced opposite to said points, said second disk having streamlined perforations aligned with said perforations of said first disk for said flow therethrough; a non-conducting barrier disk between said first and second disks at a parallel position thereto, said barrier disk having for said flow therethrough a plurality of conical pressure orifices into which said points protrude; and electrical conductors connecting said electrode disks to a source of electrical potential, with said first disk positive in respect to said second disk.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,077,108 2/1963 Gage 1031 3,119,233 1/1964 Wattendorf 60-3 5.5 3,133,500 5/1964 Benz 103-1 3,135,208 6/1964 Stuetzer 103-1 3,212,442 10/1965 Jorgenson 1031 LAURENCE V. EFNER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/48, 313/231.1
International ClassificationH02N11/00
Cooperative ClassificationH02N11/006
European ClassificationH02N11/00C