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Publication numberUS3268160 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 23, 1966
Filing dateApr 6, 1964
Priority dateApr 6, 1964
Publication numberUS 3268160 A, US 3268160A, US-A-3268160, US3268160 A, US3268160A
InventorsTalley Alvin W
Original AssigneeTalley Alvin W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifuge
US 3268160 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3, 1966 A. w. TALLEY 3,268,160

CENTRIFUGE Filed April 6, 1964 INVENTOR. A/w'rz (4/. Til/[3y BY ,MILM

Af/amgys United States Patent 3,268,160 CENTRIFUGE Alvin W. Talley, 661 Bourbon Circle, Birmingham, Ala. Filed Apr. 6, 1964, Ser. No. 357,542 1 Claim. (Cl. 233-26) This invention relates to a centrifuge and more particularly to a centrifuge for materials carried in elongated receptacles, such as capillary tubes and the like.

An object of my invention is to provide a centrifuge which may be easily and quickly mounted on a rotating tool, such as the mandrel of a dental hand-piece.

Another object of my invention is to provide a centrifuge of the character designated which shall be particularly adapted for testing blood or other specimens carried in capillary tubes wit-h one end of each capillary tube being sealed and the other or inner end thereof being open.

A further object of my invention is to provide a centrifuge of the character designated which shall include an elongated tube-like member having removable closure members at each end thereof whereby the receptacles carrying the specimens may be readily introduced and removed from the apparatus.

A further object of my invention is to provide a centrifuge of the character designated which shall be simple of construction, economical of manufacture and one which may be operated and maintained in a clean and sanitary condition at all times.

Heretofore in the art to which my invention relates, various type centrifuges have been proposed. However, such centrifuges have been unsatisfactory due to the fact that they are complicated in structure and embody parts which must move from one position while stationary to another position upon imparting rotation thereto. In accordance with the present invention, I provide an elongated tube-like member of a size and length to receive an elongated receptacle, such as a capillary tube. The ends of the tube-like member are closed by removable closure members. A mandrel is secured non-rotatably adjacent one end to the tube-like member intermediate the ends thereof while the other end of the mandrel is adapted to be connected to a rotary drive member, such as a dental hand-piece.

Apparatus embodying features of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, forming a part of this application, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view showing the centrifuge attached to a dental hand-piece; and,

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, sectional view taken generally along the line 22 of FIG. 1.

Referring now to the drawing for a better understanding of my invention, I show an elongated tube-like member which may be formed of a suitable material, such as stainless steel or the like. As shown in FIG. 2, the tube-like member 10 is of a size and length for each end there-of to receive an elongated receptacle, such as a capillary tube 11. A specimen of blood or other material is drawn inwardly of the capillary tube 11 and one end thereof is closed as at 12 by suitable means, such as by heating that end of the tube above its melting point. I have found that my improved apparatus is particularly adapted for use with relatively small capillary tube-s approximately 3 inches in length. Where such small capillary tubes are employed, the inside diameter of the tubelike member 10 is approximately .062 inch. However, it will be apparent that the inside diameter of the tube-like member 10 is dependent upon the outside diameter of the capillary tube or other receptacle placed therein.

Each end of the tube-like member 10 is provided with external threads 13 for receiving the internal threads of a closure member indicated generally at 14. Each closure member 14 comprises a nut-like member 16 having in- Patented August 23, 1966 ternal threads which engage the external threads 13 on the tube-like member 10, as shown in FIG. 2. The outer end of the internally threaded member 16 is closed by a backing member 17 which is preferably formed of a suitable resin, such as acrylic resin. Accordingly, the backing member 17 not only closes the outer ends of the tube-like member 10, but forms a seat 18 which is in position to engage the outer end of the capillary tube 11 as the same is moved outwardly by centrifugal force. By forming the backing member 17 of a resin-like material, the tube 10 may be balanced by removing the required amount of the resin material.

To impart rotation to the tube-like member 10, a centrally disposed opening 19 is provided therein for receiving a retaining element, such .as a screw 21. As shown in FIG. 1, an axially extending threaded opening 22 is provided in one end of a mandrel 23 for receiving the retaining screw 21. The other end of the mandrel 23 is adapted to be attached to a rotary drive member, such as a dental handpiece 2-4 which is driven by suitable means, such as a drive belt 26, in a manner well understood in the art. Preferably, the mandrel 23 is secured rigidly to the tube-like member 10 by suitable means, such as by solder, to prevent unscrewing or separation of the tube-like member 10 from the mandrel 23 upon braking the apparatus.

From the foregoing description the operation of my improved apparatus will be readily understood. The removable closure members 14 are removed from the ends of the tube-like member 10 and the capillary tubes 11 containing the desired specimen are inserted into each end of the tube-like me her 10. The closure members 14 are then threaded onto the threaded ends 13 of the tube-like member whereby the seats 18 are in position to limit outward movement of the capillary tubes 11 upon imparting rotation to the tube-like member 10. The mandrel 23 is attached to the rotary member 24. Upon imparting rotary motion to the mandrel 23, the tube-like member 10 revolves whereby the constituents of the material within the capillary tube 11 are separated by centrifugal action. To remove the capillary tubes 11, the closure members 14 are removed from the threads 13 whereupon the capillary tubes are free to slide outwardly of the open threads of the elongated tube-like member 10. In actual practice, I have found that fluids remain in the capillary tubes 11 even though the inner ends thereof are left open and the tubes are positioned in a horizontal position. By heating the outer ends of the capillary tubes at 12, the sealed ends prevent outward movement of the fluids upon rotation of the tube-like member 10 and at the same time engage the seats 18 to limit outward movement of the capillary tubes.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have devised an improved centrifuge for materials carried in elongated receptacles, such as capillary tubes and the like. By providing an elongated, tube-like member for receiving the capillary tubes at each end thereof, together with means for closing the outer ends of the tube-like member, I provide a seat for the outer ends of the capillary tubes. Also, the apparatus is extremely simple to assemble and disassemble and at the same time is adapted for easy attachment to a portable tool, such as a dental hand piece. By providing a centrifuge which consists of a minimum of parts and contains no parts which must move from a vertical position to a horizontal position, the apparatus is trouble-free in operation and may be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition with a minimum of effort. Furthermore, by providing a centrifuge in which the parts thereofare adapted to lie in a single plane, rmy improved apparatus requires a minimum of space for storage and shipment.

While I have shown my invention in but one form, it

What I claim is: In a centrifuge for materials carried in elongated receptacles (a) an elongated tube-like member of a size and length for each end thereof to receive one of said receptacles,

(b) said elongated tube-like member being provided with external threads adjacent each end thereof, (0) removable closure members having internal threads engaging said external threads at the ends of said elongated tube-like member, said members comprising nuts with resin-like outer coverings to facilitate balancing of the centrifuge by removing some of the resin, and

(d) a mandrel secured non-rotatably to said tube-like member intermediate the ends of said tube-like member near the middle thereof with the other end of said mandrel having means for connecting to a rotary drive member whereby rotary motion is imparted to said mandrel and said elongated tube-like member carried thereby.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 780,315 1/190-5 Wetherill 233-26 1,648,369 11/ 1927 Svedberg et al. 2,179,839 11/ 1939 Brosnan 233--26 X 3,009,388 11/196'l Polanyi.

M. CARY NELSON, Primary Examiner.

HENRY T. KLINKSIEK, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US780315 *Aug 5, 1904Jan 17, 1905Henry Emerson WetherillHaematokrit.
US1648369 *Sep 10, 1923Nov 8, 1927Nichols James BAnalytical centrifuge
US2179839 *Feb 8, 1937Nov 14, 1939Becton Dickinson CoThermometer shaker
US3009388 *Dec 30, 1957Nov 21, 1961American Optical CorpApparatus for determining fluid fractions and sedimentataion rates
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3750941 *May 10, 1971Aug 7, 1973Bio Consultants IncCentrifuge power head with mounting means
US4740472 *Aug 5, 1985Apr 26, 1988The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Department Of EnergyMethod and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer
US5789259 *Sep 27, 1996Aug 4, 1998Robert A. LevineMethod and apparatus for mixing samples in a capillary tube
US6905454Jun 30, 2003Jun 14, 2005The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyHandheld and hand-powered centrifuge device
US20110130263 *Sep 24, 2010Jun 2, 2011Del Vecchio Daniel ASyringe centrifuge systems
WO2004002601A2 *Jun 30, 2003Jan 8, 2004Us Gov Sec ArmyHandheld and hand-powered centrifuge device
WO2009123447A1 *Mar 27, 2009Oct 8, 2009Jan HesselsMicrocentrifuge device for collecting and separating blood
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/16
International ClassificationB04B5/04, A61C19/00, B04B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61C19/00, B04B5/0414
European ClassificationA61C19/00, B04B5/04B2