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Publication numberUS3269034 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1966
Filing dateFeb 14, 1964
Priority dateFeb 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3269034 A, US 3269034A, US-A-3269034, US3269034 A, US3269034A
InventorsGlass Marvin I, Harry Disko, Verbickas Dalia E
Original AssigneeMarvin Glass & Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Decorator kit
US 3269034 A
Images(5)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 30, 1966 Filed Feb. 14, 1964 M. l. GLASS ET AL DECORATOR KIT 5 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 30 E966 M. 1. GLASS ET AL DECORATOR KIT 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 14, 1964 Aug- 30, 1966 M. l. GLASS ET Al. 3,269,034

DECORATOR KIT Filed Feb. 14, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 ug- 30, 1966 M. 1. GLASS ET AL DECORATOR KIT 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 14, 1954 S E A @om 5 www@ 7% Ewyf i @MMM Aug- 30. l966 M. l. GLASS ET AL DECORATOR KIT 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. 14, 1964 United States Patent O 3,269,034 DECURATOR KIT Marvin I. Glass, Chicago, Harry Disko, Park Ridge, and Dalia E. Verhicltas, Chicago, Ill., assignors to Marvin Glass da Associates, Chicago, Ill., a partnership Fiied Feb. I4, 1964, Ser. No. 344,876 6 Claims. (Cl. 35-53) The present invention relates to a decorators kit or hobby set, and comprises basically a set of parts ,which may be assembled as will appear, for amusement or more profitably for study, in three dimensions, of various house arrangements, together with various decorative schemes and disposition of furniture in the house. Prior devices of this general type are characterized by a strictly limited variety of forms to which the apparatus may be adapted, and have not lent themselves well to testing furniture arrangements, color schemes, effect of different fabric textures and the like and the various possible dispositions of the many built-in fixtures and appliances found in a modern house. Accordingly, a major object of the invention is to provide a set of components which may be assembled in a plurality of combinations to make a series of buildings illustrating a variety of room arrangements, and which may be characterized by different color schemes in the various rooms, and by different numbers and arrangements of built-in fixtures and features. A further object is to provide a set of parts which parts are grouped in accordance with various types of furniture pieces, and which may be readily assembled with other parts in said group to form a plurality of furniture pieces having a variety of decorative characteristics, to be tried in the building to test the overall decorative effect.

Further objects will become apparent from the following specification and drawings, in which:

FIGURE l is a perspective of an assembled model of part of an aparment or house with various items of builtin fixtures and typical furniture in place;

FIGURE 2 is a similar view of a combined kitchen and laundry room;

FIGURE 3 is a similar view of an elaborately equipped bath room;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary perspective view of a part of a floor and portions of wall framing together with a corner post or column;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of a group of complementary parts which may be assembled into several styles of chairs;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective and bottom plan view of a seat indicated in FIGURE l;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of a group of parts which may be assembled into any one of six different tables;

FIGURE 8 is a bottom plan and a perspective View of a coffee table;

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of a fireplace;

FIGURE l is an elevation, partly in axial section, of a group of parts which can be assembled into a variety of table lamps;

FIGURE 11 is a perspective view of a group of parts which can be assembled to provide any of a variety of beds;

FIGURE l2 is a back view of a picture or mirror indicated in FIGURE l;

FIGURE 13 is a perspective view of a plurality of parts which may be assembled to form several types of chair;

FIGURE 14 is a perspective or exploded view of a set of parts which can be assembled to provide a wardrobe, or a stacked washer and dryer unit;

FIGURE l is a perspective view of a set of parts which make up into a combined sink and stove with a rice variety of arrangements of dish washers for the sink and a variety of oven arrangements for the stove;

FIGURE 16 is a perspective view of a corner cabinet which includes a clock and which may be carried on the walls of the building;

FIGURE 17 is a perspective View of a set of parts which may be assembled into a cabinet or various bathroom fixtures;

FIGURE 18 is a similar View of a ower box with a panel carrying simulated flowers;

FIGURE 19 is a perspective view of a special wall panel including a door;

FIGURE 2() is a rear elevation of a mirror;

FIGURE 21 is a perspective view of a range hood;

FIGURE 22 is a perspective view of a wall cabinet;

FIGURE 23 is a similar view of a flower pot or planter; and

FIGURE 24 is a perspective view of a shelf structure.

Referring first to the construction of the building, the same is set up or built on a board or panel simulating `a floor 30, FIGURE l, and which may be of any suitable material, such as wood, or one of the many types of molded plastics which lend themselves well to forming of small intricate shapes. It is contemplated that floor panels of various shapes and sizes may be supplied as part of the kit in order to lend flexibility to the outfit. In FIGURE 1, four rooms have been laid out including a bedroom 32, a recreation room 34, a living room 36, and a dining room 38, it being understood that another floor panel and walls might be readily added to furnish the other essential rooms for a complete apartment.

The fioor panels are preferably sheets of relatively rigid material of the size desired, and carry wall frame units 4th, at least some of which are preferably arranged around the edges of the floor panels to form the walls of the simulated house. As `seen particularly in FIG- IURE 4, each wall panel comprises a lower Stringer or sill portion 42, a pair of end stud portions 44, one or more intermediate stud portions 416, and an upper Stringer porti-on 48. Lower Stringer portion 42 includes an inner upstanding flange 50 and a horizontal flange 52, and when the parts are assembled flange 52 is ordinarily placed with its edge .flush with the edge of the floor panel and fastened thereto by means of a spring material clip54. Clip 54 may be made of any suitable material which has a satisfactory degree of elasticity, and has a web portion 56 from which extend `substantially at right angles, upper and lower tongues 58 and 60. The space between tongues 58 and 60 is preferably slightly less than the combined thickness of floor panel 30 and lower web 52 of wall unit 40, so that clip `54 is stretched in place, and holds the wall sections and iioor firmly together. As many yas necessary of clips 54 may be ernployed so that the resulting structure will be firm and strong.

Stud portions 44 and `46 are provided with grooves or slots y62 extending 'substantially the length thereof and facing outwardly, and also with grooves or slots 64 facing inwardly, and preferably all of the slots are of the same cross section for a purpose to appear. Stud portions 44 have elongated tongues or ribs 66 which project from the `studs in the same general direction as the length of the wall sections, and which are of `a length approximating that of the stud portions. 'The cross section of these tongues is such that they have a snug frictional fit in slots 62 and 64, so that a wall `can be readily set up at right angles to `another by forcing the rib on one Wall section into one of the grooves or slots on another. In this way, partitions can be formed approximately at desired intervals in the model building. Where it is desired to extend a wall beyond the length of a wall Aframe section, a cruciform column 68 is use-d, which is when putu provided with slots 70, 72, 74 and 76, which preferably extend for the full length of the column and are dimensioned, like the other slots, to receive the tongues or ribs `66 with a gentle but tirm friction grip. A column 68 would be used at any corner, as well as in a long wall, :and it would be necessary at any point where four walls came together.

Each of the stud portions 44 has a flange 78 on what might be termed the outer edge there-of, and which faces inwardly as related to the space enclosed by the stringers and stu-ds, and studs 46 are each equipped with similar f flanges 80 and 82, so that a space is provided between the studs, defined on one side by the anges 78 and 80, and on the -other by inner ange 50. Upper stringer 48 extends along the inner side of studs 44 and 46 in vertical alignment with inner flange 50, the whole defining a holder for a wall panel 84 which may be slid down between the studs, and held captive by the anges.

It is contemplated that a supply of wall panels of a variety of colors and textures will be included as a part of the kit. Each wall panel may have a diterent color and/or pattern on its opposite sides. Thus, it will be possible to set up, within reason, almost any type of building in miniature, changing and experimenting with Various room arrangements, color schemes and textures, so as to visualize in three dimensions-perhaps for clients, as by an interior decorator-a great number of different styles, ideas of decor, etc. Furthermore, while the slots in the walls are small enough to be unobtrusive, still they are available for supporting typical built-in features, such as kitchen cabinets, pictures, draperies, an-d the like.

In additon to wall panels of various colors and textures, a Variety of special wall panels are contemplated, for example, a panel with a window is shown at 84 in FIGURE 1, and at 86 is shown a valance with a wide window curtain which extends across two wall panels, and may simulate a large picture window for living room 36. Such features are supported by providing them with suitable tongues which t frictionally into the grooves or slots in the stud portions.

In a building program, once the building itself is decided upon it is necessary to determine what the furnishings will be, and a great variety of simulated furniture is provided by .making various furniture items in the form of sets of parts which can be assembled in various ways to make, for example, a number of chairs with diiferent type of legs, pedestals, upholstery, etc., beds of different styles, and different types of ranges, washers and the like.

Turning again to FIGURE 1, bedroom 32 is formed of panels having three bays, and which may be fitted together at the corners by inserting tongues 66, in slots 62 or 6:4 as shown in detail in FIGURE 4. The room has a bed 818 and bed 90, more particularly shown in FIGURE 1,1. The beds shown in FIGURE 1 are very simple and severe, but if desired, a head board 92 and/or a foot board 94 may be applied to try the effect of more elaborate beds in the setting, or head and foot boards 92 and 94 may double as frame members to support bed 8'8 above bed 90 to visualize a bunk-bed effect. Head and foot boards 92 and 94 have flanges 93y and 95 which engage low head and foot boards 97 and 99 respectively, on bed 90 to prevent displacement of head and foot boards 913 and 95` The room also has a dresser or chest of drawers 96, and a picture 98 which m-ay be tried o-n the wall, the picture being provided on the back with suitable tongues engaging the grooves in studs 46. Such a picture could also serve to visualize a high window over the dresser 96.

Turning to room 34, it is first to be noted that the room has a raised oor panel 98, a low iiight of steps 100 providing access to the raised area and assisting in supporting the floor above floor panel 30. Floor panel 98 may also have portions engaged in the slots in studs 44 and 46. As stated,`various wall panels are interchangeable in the walls and partitions, and in room 34 a panel 102 is inserted in Cil one of the bays of the partition between room 34 and room 32, and which has a door 104 therein, as better shown in FIGURE 19. This panel is interchangeable with the others, and may be inserted where necessary to simulate actual living quarters. The door panel 104 swings on hinge members 106, which have tongues 108, the hinge members being connected by a strip 110. Tongues 108 may grip a variety of panels of different colors or textures so that the door may be made to go with a variety of decorative schemes.

Room 34 has a wall cabinet 112 which may have tongues engaged in the slot in stud 46 although all that is necessary is for cabinet 112 to rest on floor 98. A second unit 112 is placed end-to-end with the first, to give the desired length.

Above cabinet 112 a mirror 118 may be installed, and which has ribs on its back, as particularly shown in FIGURE 12, for engagement in the slot in stud 46. Mirror 118 also has ribs 122 on its back, transverse to ribs 120, the ribs being spaced-apart at the center of the rnirror so that the mirror may be installed with its long dimension either vertical or horizontal by inserting the appropriate ribs in the nearest stud-slot.

Stools 124 may be arranged about cabinet 112, which may serve as a refreshment counter, the stools taking on various aspects as more particularly indicated in FIG- URES 5, 6 and 13. A top or cushion part 126, FIGURE 6, is provided with a plurality of openings or sockets 128, and a center socket 130, the latter being adapted to receive the end portion 132 of a four legged pedestal 134, FIG- URE 13. A base type pedestal 136 might equally well be used to support cushions 126 to supply a variation in the type of stools, and sockets 128 can be supplied with legs 138 which also tit on chair 140 shown in FIGURE 5.

Room 34 is provided with a fireplace 142 which has a tongue 143, FIGURE 9, engaged in the slot in a stud 46. As also seen in FIGURE 9, fireplace 142 comprises onehalf of a unit which is open on all sides. If desired, the whole unit may be installed away from the wall in the center of the room, or if a wall location is preferred, the half portion may be used as shown. Tongue 143 engages a suitable slot in the complementary portion 144 so that the portions will stay together when a wall location is not used.

As stated, different textures of wall panels will be furnished as part of the kit, and in room 34 wall panels 146 simulating stone work are used.

A picture 148 is carried on the common wall of rooms 34 and 36, so as to be seen from both, and has ribs or tongues engaged with the groove in stud 46 on its back, as in the case of ribs 120 and 122 of mirror 118.

At the edge of oor panel 98 between rooms 34 and 36 is a low railing or partial partition 150, and which may be fastened to floor 98 in a manner similar to that used in connection with wall frame elements 40.

Room 36 in the particular scheme illustrated has cabinets 152 which may be similar or identical with hereinbefore mentioned cabinets 112. Between cabinets 152 isy located a table 154 which has legs 138 which are preferably removable and interchangeable with others forming part of the kit, so as to be available to assemble variations of several types of pieces. Table 154 is of a low height, and has a cushion 158 thereon whereby it may serve as a seat.

A rug 160 selected from a plurality thereof is placed on the floor of room 36, and chairs 162 may be supplied from the kit in various types to try in the decorative scheme. The possibilities for variation in the chairs are best shown in FIGURE 5. In chairs 162, a previously mentioned body portion comprising a seat or cushion 164, a back 166 and arm rests 169 is used. Body portion 140 is readily snapped into place on a support 168, thus making a chair with certain characteritics of style. These are the chairs used in room 36. Support 168 may equally well carry a plain cushion 158, or a cushion 172 with a back only, and each of the body portions 140, 170 and 172 is preferably provided with sockets 174 for receiving a plurality of legs, and a central socket 176 for attaching to a pedestal. It will be apparent that a great variety of chairs or seating facilities can be provi-ded for study by means of the components disclosed in FIGURE 5, and particularly when taken along with the components disclosed in FIGURE 13.

A stereo or television cabinet is shown at 178, and a shelf of books 180 is formed with tongues in the manner previously disclosed and mounted on studs 46 forming part of the wall between rooms 36 and 38.

A lamp 182 is placed on table 154 and, as best shown in FIGURE l0, consists of a shade portion 184 and base portions 186 and 188. Base portions 186 and 188 are of diiierent heights and styles so that a lamp may be formed which will complement different types of interiors. It should be noted that base 188 is shown in an inverted position, and would have to be turned over to receive shade 184. If an exceptionally tall lamp is desired, another base 190 would be used, and which would suppport base 188 in its inverted position, the latter receiving shade 184 at the combined height of bases 190 and 188. It is contemplated that bases 188 and 198 can be of different heights to give still greater possible combinations.

Room 38 has a rug 192 and chairs 194 formed from body portions 172, previously disclosed, but having legs 138 instead of supports 168. Another seat 196 in this room is formed from cushion portion 170, FIGURE 5, along with support 168.

Room 38 has a table 198 formed from a top 200, as seen in FIGURE 8, and legs 202. Top 200 is preferably provided with a socket 204 for fastening .to a pedestal, as will appear, as well as with sockets 206 fo-r receiving legs 202. Table 198, as well as table 154 and cabinet 112 may have items for decoration such as a flower pot 208, a piece of statuary 210 and an ornamental lamp 182. A wall cabinet or bookcase 214 has tongues engaged with the slots in studs 46 of wall 216 in .the manner hereinbefore described in connection with cabinet 11.2.

Room 38 also has a dining table 2118 which may assume various styles, as more particularly shown in FIGURE 7. A pedestal `220 has a base portion 222 and an upstanding pin or dowel portion 224, on which may be placed any of a number of table tops 226, 228 and 230 to form different styles of table. A different style of pedestal 232 having legs 234 and a dowel 236 may be substit-uted for pedestal 220 for a different decorative style. Table 218 has associa-ted therewith dining chairs 238, each of which chairs has a contour type body portion 240, as best shown in FIGURE 13, mounted on above described pedestal 136 for a different effect.

The system of modeling living quarters contemplated by the invention is particularly adaptable to the kitchen, and a typical kitchen is shown in FIGURE 2. Here a oor 242 has walls 244, 246 and 248 set up around the periphery thereof, wall 246 including a panel having a window 250. Window 258` supports a flower box 252 which, as shown in FIGURE 23 has tongues 254 engaging suitable slots in window 250.

The kitchen is an excellent example of the adaptability of the invention to the visualization of built-in xtures. Starting at the left side, a snack-bar 256 is supported on a leg 258 at one end, and on a shelf structure or whatnot 260, these units being shown best in FIGURE 24. Member 256 has a narrow projecting rib or tongue 262 which may be utilized to fasten member 256 to other units. It also has a downwardly projecting boss 264 which may engage in an opening `266 in shelf structure 260 so that .the latter may be used as the outer end support if desired. The whole can be used to form a room divider, as is currently common.

Next to snackbar 256 is a large upright cabinet 268 which may simulate a wardrobe, but in the illustrative embodiment is made to simulate a built-in oven 270. As seen in FIGURE 14, the cabinet has a variety of front panels, a panel 272 simulating an oven, as aforesaid, while a panel 274 would simulate an automatic washing machine built into cabinet 268 beneath the oven. Drawerfronts 276 and doors 278 may snap into place instead of fronts 272 and 274, whereupon cabinet 268 will simulate a wardrobe. The several fronts can be applied to cabinet 268 in various combinations, according to what is required of cabinet 268.

Next to cabinet 268 is a simulated dryer 280, and next to that a simulated washing machine 282. Next to washing machine 282 is a cabinet v284, the several units forming together a countentop 285 running nearly the full length of wall 244. The space above the counterstop formed by washer 282, dryer 280 and cabinet 284 is occupied by wall cabinets 286 and 288 which are preferably identical, and supported on the wall by tongues 290, best shown in FIGURE 22, engaged with the grooves in studs 46 of wall 244. Each cabinet is provided with notches 292 which will lit about tongues 290 of an adjoining cabinet so that a continuous `series of cabinets may be installed along a wall when desired. By virtue of the natu-re of the material, which is contemplated as molded plastic, the cabinets will stay in place when supported at only one end, but if desired, it is within the contemplation of the invention to supply tongues in staggered relation at both ends of the cabinets and to offset the notches, so that the cabinets can be supported at both ends, if desired.

The fronts of cabinets 286 and 288 are interchangeable with other of different styles, so that different types of decor may be tested and visualized.

Beneath window 250 a sink cabinet 2914 is placed, and which needs no partcula-r explanation. However, a similar cabinet is shown in detail in FIGURE l5, and comprises a base 296, which is divided at the center by a partition 298. The front of the cabinet is open, as is also the top, and a panel 300 may rest in the top opening at either side of partition 298, or it may straddle partition 298, the resulting open spaces at the ends being closed by drain-board panels 302 and 304, FIGURE 2. In this way, three styles of sink are available from base 296 and panel 300. For another decorative scheme, panel 300 may be installed in one of the top openings in base 2196, say the right opening, and a stove top 306 may be in- `stalled in the other, an oven door 308, and a storage compartment door 310 inishing the front on the stove side, while a dish washer front 312 and a .washing machine front 314, may be installed in the base 296 beneath the sink panel. This would be for a considerably different kitchen layout than that of FIGURE 2, but it will illustrate the versatility of the system.

A cupboard 316 is installed on the wall tol the right of sink 294, and next to it a stove 318. The stove can be made up from top 306, FIGURE 15, which is placed on a cabinet similar to cabinet 296, and which may form part of stove 318 and also at the same time part of cabine-t 3l16. Door, or other fronts may be selected from those available in the kit, such as 278 or 276. A simulated refrigerator 320 is installed on the Hoor next to the stove 318, and completes the complement of major items in the kitchen.

However, over drain board 304 a corner cabinet 322, better shown in FIGURE 16, is installed. It comprises a section 324, and a complementary section 326, which `fit together, and have staggered tongues 328 and 330 which intermesh with, or cross each other so they can engage `appropriate grooves in adjoining end stubs 44. Sec-tions 324 and 326 also have end tongues 332 and 334 which may be engaged with intermediate stubs 46, so that cabinet 322 is well supported. Cabinet 322 al-so has a section 336 which simulates a clock, and which has'spaced tongues 338 which engage with shelves 340 and 342 to lsupport the clock unit an cabinet 322. A choice of doors 7 lcir other fronts for cabinet 322 will be available in the i it.

Cabinets 344 and 346 of the type described in connection with FIGURE 22, but of more elongated proportions are installed as a continuation of cabinet 322, respectively, over stove 316 and refrigerator 320, and a range hood 348 is supported from cabinet 344 over stove 318 in the usual relation. Hood 348, as more particularly shown in FIGURE 21 has a hook-like flange 350 which engages the inner edge of the lower wall of cabinet 344 so that hood 348 is securely supported above stove 318.

A telephone iS indicated at 352. Stools 354 are associated with snack-bar 256, and are assembled from bases 136, hereinbefore described, and cushions 126, as seen in FIGURES 13 and 6 respectively.

The last room in the illustrative embodiment is shown in FIGURE 3, and visualizes a bathroom. A floor panel 354 is enclosed by walls 355, 357 and 359, and has a rug or bath mat 356. A high cabinet 358, similar to above described cabinet 346 is engaged with studs 44 and 46. Beneath cabinet 358 is a towel bar 360. Next to towel bar 360 is a double wash basin 362. As more particularly shown in FIGURE 17, wash basin 362 comprises essentially a top section 364 which may be of any desired design, and which has tongues 366 which may engage in the slots in studs 46. Top 364 may therefore be self-supporting or it may be otherwise styled. For example, the underside of top 364 may be provided with sockets which receive legs 368, FIGURE 3. If desired, for a different decorative Scheme, top 364 mayrest on a cabinet base 370, and various styles of doors as 278, FIGUR-E 14, may be assembled with base 370.

Base 370 may double aS a vanity in which case a frame 372 may be engaged with studs 46 and rest on cabinet 370. iFrame 372 is closed with a panel 374, so that the result is a wall cabinet with a closed counter-top. For still another decorative scheme, cabinet 370 may be omitted and frame 372 may be supported on legs as 368, received in sockets 376.

A toilet 378 may be placed on floor 354 wherever desired.

Above basin 362 a mirror 380 is installed, being supported by engagement of suitable tongues with Studs 46, and a simulated lamp 382 may be installed in an analogous manner above mirror 380.

A decoration 384 is supported in a preferred place on a stud 46 and generally beneath it is a clothes hamper 386.

A bath tub `388 is installed in a corner next to hamper 386, a Screen or panel 390 standing vertically at the foot of the tub and having suitable tongues engaged with the Slot in a stud `46. Screen 390 may be of any preferred design and it is contemplated that several designs will be included in the kit to give a choice. A shower curtain rail 392 extends above and lengthwise of the edge of the tub 388, engaged with a stud 46 and with screen 390, a suitable curtain 394 being suspended from rail 392. A simulated shower nozzle 396 is engaged with a stud 44 in position to discharge in proper relation to tub 388.

A planter 398 is placed on the iloor in a position to complement screen 390, as more particularly Shown in FIGURE 18, and consists of a base portion 400 with a removable top portion 402 which may simulate earth with flowers growing therein. It is contemplated that a Selection of tops 402 will be supplied to give a choice of the kinds and colors of ilowers available.

A vanity 404 is placed against the right wall 359, assembled from some of the parts described in FIGURE 17. A tray 406 is shown and a Seat or bench 408 composed of above mentioned base 168, FIGURE 5, to which may be added if desired cushion 170. The usual articles found on a fixture of this type are simulated and a shelf 410 is supported ove1 vanity 404 and has lights 412 suspended therefrom. Above shelf 410 a cabinet 414 similar to cabinet 358 is supported on Studs 44 and 46.

FIGURE 2O shows the back of a mirror 416 which is round and which has a rib or tongue 418 which may be engaged in any stud 46 to support the mirror where desired.

The vanity 404 may also have a stool 420, preferably made up from a base 136, FIGURE 13, and a cushion 170, FIGURE 5.

This completes the description of typical interior decorative schemes which can be readily set up for consideration and study by means of the kit constituting this invention. It is thought to `be clear that the novel conception of interchangeable parts will yield an almost infinite variety of interior decorating ideas, room arrangements and the like. It is conceivable that variations on the idea will occur to those skilled in the art, and it is to be understood that the invention is not intended to be taken as limited by the disclosures and description herein. The device will provide graphic three dimensional illustrations of proposed buildings and decorative schemes, particularly to those untrained in the art of making and reading drawings.

What is claimed is:

1. In a decorator kit, a building construction comprising `a iloor, a plurality of frame members of generally rectangular form, each comprising a lower Stringer portion, an upper Stringer portion, and a plurality of vertical end and intermediate stud portions joining said upper and lower stringer portions, said Stud portions each having a slot extending along the length thereof on one side, and also having a slot extending substantially the length thereof on the other side, and the end stud portions of said frame members each having a rib extending along the length thereof and projecting in the direction of said frame, said ribs and said slots being of a common crosssectional dimension whereby said ribs are engageable in said slots to form miniature building frames of various configurations at the wish of the decorato-r.

2. In a decorator kit, a building construction comprising a floor, a plurality of frame members of generally rectangular form, each comprising a lower Stringer portion, an upper stringer portion, and a plurality of vertical end and intermediate stud portions joining said upper and lower Stringer portions, said stud portions each having a slot extending along the length of one side thereof and also having a slot extending substantially the length thereof on the opposite side thereof, Iand the end stud portions of said frame members each having a rib extending along the length thereof and projecting in the direction of Said frame, all of said ribs and said slots being of a common cross-sectional dimension whereby said ribs are engageable in said slots to form miniature building frames of various configurations at the wish of the decorator, a plurality of wall panels sized to fit between said stud portions, Iand a plurality of fixtures, each of said fixtures having a rib sized to engage with one of the Slots in said Studs for supporting such fixtures on a wall formed by said st-uds and wall panels.

3. in a decorator kit, a building construction comprising a floor, a plurality of cruciforrn columns, providing slots on lall sides thereof, a plurality of frame members of generally rectangular form, each comprising a lower stringer portion, an upper stringer portion, and a plurality of vertical end and inter-mediate stud portions joining said upper and lower stringer portions, each of Said lower stringers having an upwardly directed flange along one edge thereof, each of said stud portions having an inwardly directed flange along the edge thereof spaced from the Stringer flange, said stud portions each having `a slot extending along the length thereof spaced from said stringer flange, and also having a slot extending substantially the length thereof on the sid-e adjacent said stringer flange, and the end stud portions of each frame member having a rib extending along the length thereof and projecting in the direction of said frame, Said ribs and Said Slots being of a common cross sectional dimension whereby Said ribs are engageable frictionally in Said slots to form miniature building frames of various configurations at the wish of the decorator, and a plurality of wall panels Sized to fit between said stud portions to be retained in place by engagement with said Stringer flange, said upper Stringer and the stud flanges.

4. In a decorator kit, a building construction comprising a floor, a plurality of cruciform columns, providing slots on all sides thereof, a plurality of frame members of generally rectangular form, each comprising a lower Stringer portion, an upper Stringer portion, and a plurality of vertical end and intermediate stud portions joining said upper and lower stringer portions, each of said lower Stringer portions @having an upwardly directed liange along one edge thereof, each of said Stud portions having an inwardly directed flange portion along the edge thereof spaced from the Stringer flange, said stud portions each having a slot extending along the length thereof spaced from Said Stringer flange, and also having a slot extending substantially the length thereof on the side adjacent Said Stringer flange, and the end stud portions of each frame member having a rib extending along the length thereof yand projecting in the direction of said frame, said ribs and said slots being of a common cross-sectional dimension whereby said ribs are engageable in the slots of said studs and also in the Slots of Said columns to form miniature building frames of various configurations yat the wish of the decorator, a plurality of Wall panels sized to fit between said Stud portions to be retained in place by engagement with said Stringer flange, said upper Stringer and the stud flanges, and a plurality of fixtures, each of said fixtures having a rib sized to engage with one of the slots in said Studs for supporting said xture on a wall formed by sald studs and wall panels.

5. In a decorator kit, a building construction comprising a floor, a plurality of frame members -generally rectangular in form, each comprising a lower Stringer portion, an upper Stringer portion, and a plurality of vertical end and intermediate stud portions joining Said upper and lower Stringer portions, each of said lower Stringer portions having an upwardly directed flange along one edge thereof, each of said stud portions having an inwardly directed flange portion yalong the edge thereof spaced from the Stringer ange, said stud portions each having a slot extending along the length thereof spaced from said Stringer flange, and also having a slot extending Substantially the length thereof on the side adjacent `10 said Stringer flange, and the end Stud portions of each frame member having a rib extending along the length thereof and projecting in the direction of said frame, said ribs and Said Slots being of a common cross Sectional dimension whereby said ribs are engageable frictionally in Said slots to form miniature building frames of various `configurations at the wish of the decorator, a plurality of wall panels sized to fit between said Stud portions to be retained in place by engagement with said Stringer ange,

said upper Stringer and the stud flanges, and a plurality of fixtures, each of said ixtures having a rib Sized to engage frictionally with one of the slots in Said studs for supporting said fixture on a wall formed by said studs and wall panels.

6. In a decorator kit, a building construction comprising a floor, a plurality of frame members of generally rectangular form extending upwardly from said floor and providing walls for the building, each frame member including a plurality of spaced-apart, vertically extenomg stud portions, the inwardly facing side portions of said studs including grooves along their length, a wall panel removably inserted between each pair of said studs in supported relation with said grooves therein, means defining a plurality of openings in said studs along the exposed surface thereof which is generally parallel to said wall panels, and a plurality of fixtures, each of said fixtures having a rib Sized to engage one of said openings in said studs so as to removably Support Said fixture on the wall.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,492,057 4/ 1924 Wegener 46--15 1,492,560 5/ 1924 Fisher 46--19 1,706,696 3/1929 Kohler 46-19 2,023,300 12/1935 Barnett 35-16 X 2,127,047 8/1938 Pinney 35-16 X 2,522,149 -9/1950 Tunstall 35-16 2,528,211 10/1950 Civkin et al. 35-16 2,765,580 10/1956 Herrschaft 46-15 X 3,079,706 3/1963 Hayes 35-16 FOREIGN PATENTS 788,362 1/1958 Great Britain.

EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner. HARLAND SKOGQUIST, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification434/80, 446/105, 446/482
International ClassificationA63H3/52, A63H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/52
European ClassificationA63H3/52