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Publication numberUS3269069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1966
Filing dateDec 10, 1962
Priority dateDec 10, 1962
Publication numberUS 3269069 A, US 3269069A, US-A-3269069, US3269069 A, US3269069A
InventorsCarlson Donald A
Original AssigneeCarlson Donald A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prefabricated building construction
US 3269069 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 30, 1966 Filed Dec. 10. 1962 D. A. CARLSON PREFABRICATED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet l 64 66 68 7O 72 g ti W m W w m NJ 1 74 FIG. 6

INVENTOR. DONALD A CARLSQN BY Maw ATTORNEY 0, 1966 D. A. CARLSON 3,269,069

PREFABRICATED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Dec. 10. 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 V fu INVENTOR.

DONALD A. CARLSON AT TO RN EY r 3,269,069 Patented August 30, 1966 3,269,069 PREFABRICATED BUILDING CUNSIRUCTION Donald A. Carlson, 3216 E. Pine, Wichita, Kans. Filed Dec. 10, 1962, Ser. No. 243,257 It) Claims. (Cl. S2--227) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in building construction, and more particularly pertains to means for securing wall panels to sills, posts and wall plates of special suitability for prefabricated structures.

The primary object of the invention is to provide prefabricated wall structure components and securing means therefor that will require few parts and a minimum of effort and skill to etfect assembly, with assembled walls being suitable for use in fixed structures mounted on foundations or ground support posts, or for use in mobile structures such as house trailers or truck vans mounted on vehicle frames.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a prefabricated construction wherein a single fastening means can secure a pair of posts, a wall panel or panels extending between such posts, and the sill underlying such elements or the wall plate overlying such elements, whereby a pair of such fastening means can be employed to secure an entire wall section comprised of a pair of posts, a wall panel disposed between such posts, the underlying sill, and the overlying wall plate.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a prefabricated wall construction such as set forth in the preceding paragraphs wherein contiguous wall sections can include a post common to each of such sections with such common post being at an inside corner, an outside corner, or at an intermediate position along a straight wall.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a prefabricated construction including securing means for joining posts and an intervening wall panel such that the securing means urges the posts and/or the wall panel against the associated sill and/ or wall plate.

Still another important object of the invention is to provide a securing means of the character outlined above that will be sufficiently yielding to allow relief of excessive stresses such as can be occasioned by wind, changes in uniformity or stability of building support, and steep gradients of or abrupt changes of temperature, whereby the probabilities of structural damage can be substantially reduced while affording an increased tolerance on assembly to substantial deviations of components from design dimensions.

A final important object of the invention to be specifically enumerated herein resides in the provision of securing means of the character set forth above wherein a single tension member affords the option of applying a securing force through spring means to a post and/or the wall panel adjacent thereto.

A broad aspect of the invention involves, for use in building construction, an improved securing means comprising an elongated tension member adapted to extend through a pair of spaced parallel walls, a first washer slideable on said member, a nut adjustably thread on said member, a first coiled compression spring embracing said member intermediate said first washer and the nut and having its opposite ends biased against the adjacent faces of the first washer and the nut, a second washer embracing the first spring and said member at a position intermediate and spaced between said first washer and the nut, a second coiled compression spring embracing the first spring and said member intermediate the second washer and the nut and having its opposite ends biased against the adjacent faces of the second washer and the nut, whereby the faces of the first and second washers can be adjustably urged to resiliently bear against surfaces of the walls through which the member is adapted to extend.

Another aspect of the invention relates to an improvement in building construction comprising a first straight frame member with second and third straight frame members extending perpendicularly therefrom, said second and third frame members being spaced apart and defining with said first frame member a U-shaped frame, a rectangular wall panel coplanar with the frame disposed between the second and third frame members and having an edge bearing against the first frame member, an elongated tension member extending through the Wall panel and connecting the second and third frame members, said tension member having an intermediate portion of its extent between the second and third frame members deflected toward the first frame member, means connecting an intermediate portion of the first frame member and said intermediate portion of the tension member for urging said first frame member toward the wall panel, and means for tensioning the tension member between the second and third frame members, whereby the first, second and third frame members are urged toward the wall panel. Tensioning of the tension member can be accomplished directly as is preferred, or indirectly (as by loading the connecting means to perform its function) which will result in tensioning of the tension member by a toggle-like action.

Still another aspect of the invention has do with the invention as defined in the preceding paragraph wherein said second and third frame members engage the wall panel, and wherein said wall panel is comprised of a plurality of separate sections with adjacent pairs thereof being in abutment with each other at a juncture parallel to the second and third frame members.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent as preferred embodiments of the invention are hereinafter described, such preferred embodiments of the invention being illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of an assembled wall according to the invention, hidden constructional details being shown in dashed outline;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view of the wall shown in FIGURE 1 taken on the plane of the section line 2-2, this view being shown on a slightly reduced scale and showing the wall mounted on a fixed foundation and in association with a floor and ceiling (partly shown);

FIGURE 3 is a sectional detail view taken on the plane of the section line 33, and shows the tongue and groove juncture of wall panel sections;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary elevational view of a tension member (partly shown in dashed outline), and shows the manner that the same applies yielding force against the posts and opposite lateral positions of the intervening wall panel, the wall portions of the latter being removed;

FIGURE 5 is a broken horizontal sectional detail view illustrating the manner in which contiguous wall sections can be joined by posts at inside and outside corners;

FIGURE 6 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view of the sill employed in the wall construction shown in FIG- URE l; and,

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged sectional detail View of the means provided on an end of a tension member for engagement with a post and a wall panel spacing strip.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like numerals designate similar parts throughout the various views, the reference numeral 10 designates generally a wall section according to the invention, the same being comprised of a sill or first frame member 12, posts or second and third 3, frame members 14 and 16, wall plate 18, and a wall panel designated generally at comprised of panel sections 22, 24 and 26.

In its preferred form the sill 12 is channel or U- shaped, and as shown in FIGURE 2, the wall plate 18 is similarly shaped as an inverted U. Each of the panel sections 22, 24 and 26 of the wall panel 20 is as shown in connection with panel section 22 in FIGURE 2 of double-walled construction including an outer wall 28 and an inner wall 30. The walls 28 and 3!) are joined and spaced adjacent their upper and lower extremities by horizontal spacer strips 32 and 34, and intermediate the horizontal extents of the panel sections 22, 24 and 26, the outer and inner walls 28 and 36 are joined and spaced by vertically extending spacers 36 that extend between the spacers 32 and 34. The vertically extending junctures between the panel sections 22 and 24 on one hand and between the panel sections 24 and 26 on the other hand are of the tongue and groove type. One of such junctures is shown in FIGURE 3 in connection with the juncture between the panel sections 24 and 26 wherein it will be seen that the outer and inner walls 28 and 30 of the panel section 24 is provided with a spacer 38 that is fixed to and joins the walls 28 and 36, the spacer 38 being provided with a tongue 46 that is received in a groove complementary thereto in a spacer 42 that is fixed to and joins the outer and inner walls 28 and 36 of the panel section 26. The described juncture between the panel sections 24 and 26 is designated generally at 44, and it will be understood that a similar juncture 46 is provided between the panel sections 22 and 24.

The outer and inner walls 23 and 30 of the panel section 22 is provided adjacent its extremities remote from the juncture 46 with a vertical spacer 48 fixedly connecting the walls 28 and 30 and extending the full vertical extent of the walls 32 and 34, with the extremities of the spacers 32 and 34 abutting thereagainst. The outer and inner walls 28 and 36) of the panel section 26 are provided adjacent their extremities remote from the juncture 44 with a vertical spacer 56 that fixedly connects the walls 28 and 30, such spacer 50 extending the entire vertical extent of the walls 28 and 36 with the spacers 32 and 34 abutting thereagainst.

The hollow interiors of the panel sections 22, 24 and 26 as defined by the horizontal spacers 32 and 34, the junctures 44 and 46, and the vertical spacers 48 and 50 are filled with any suitable insulating material (such as, for example, rock wool, plastic expanded in situ, fibrous sheets, etc.) as shown at 52, and as is conventional in the art, the adjacent faces of the outer and inner walls 28 and 30 can be provided with suitable vapor sealing sheets or coatings, reflective insulating material such as aluminum foil, and the like (not shown). Also in ac cordance with conventional construction practices, the horizontal spacers 32 and 34 can if deemed necessary or expedient be provided with ventilation openings, not shown.

The upper and lower edges of the outer and inner walls 28 and 30' of the wall panel 20 are rabbeted, and as best shown in FIGURE 2 engage complementary rabbeted edges of the U-shaped sill 12 and the U-shaped wall plate 18 to define rabbet joints 54 and 56 for the outer wall 28 and rabbet joints 58 and 66 for the wall 30. Such engagement of the panel sections 22, 24 and 26 between the sill 112 and the wall plate 18 prevents lateral displacement of such wall sections from between the sill 12 and the wall plate 18.

Means is provided for securing the structure thus far described in assembled relation. Such means comprises an elongated tension member 62 that extends through the post 14, the wall panel 26 intermediate the outer and inner walls 28 and 30, and the post 16, with an intermediate portion of the tension member 62 being deflected from a straight line configuration toward the sill 12 as best shown in FIGURE 4. The remote end portions of the tension member 62 extend through suitable openings or guide means in the posts 14 and 16, and the vertical spacers 48 and 59, the tension member 62 preferably being disposed below the horizontal spacer 34. The intermediate portion of the extent of the tension member 62 depends into the confines of the sill 12, and is therein engaged under a plurality of upstanding hooks 64, 66, 68, 7t and 72 rigidly fixed in any suitable manner to the web portion 74 of the sill 12. It will be noted that in the preferred construction the hooks 64 through 72 are of differing heights such that the points at which they are engaged over the tension member 62 defines an are that is convex downwardly toward the web portion 74 of the sill 12. The arrangement is such that tension of the tension member 62 will urge the intermediate portion of the extent of the sill 12 toward the wall panel 20 with such force being applied to the sill 12 at a plurality of spaced positions defined by the location of the hooks 64 through 72.

The remote end portions of the tension member 62 extending through the posts 14 and 16 are externally threaded and provided with nuts 76 and 78 adjustably threaded thereon. Tapered washers 80 and 82 are slidably fitted on the tension member 62 with the tapered faces of such washers bearing against the remote faces of the spacers 48 and 56, the washers 86 and 82 being tapered for the reason that the tension member 62 passes through the posts 14 and 116, and the spacers 43 and 56 at an angle inclined to the horizontal as shown in FIG- URE 4. A coiled compression spring 34 embraces the tension member 62 and slidably extends through the opening in the post 14 through which the tension member 62 passes, andthe coiled compression spring 84 is seated against and biased between the tapered Washer 80 and a fiat washer 86 that is in turn seated against the nut 76. In a similar manner a coiled compression spring 88 embraces the tension member 62 and extends through the post 16, with the spring 38 being biased between the tapered washer 82 and a fiat washer 96 seated against the nut 73.

With the structure thus far described, the nuts '76 and '78 can be tightened on the tension member 62 to apply a yielding force through the springs 84 and 83 against the spacers 48 and 50, whereby the panel sections 22 and 26 are urged into abutment with the panel section 24 to retain the wall panel 20 in assembled relation. Further more, tightening of the nuts 76 and 78 serves to tension the tension member 62 and thereby urge the intermediate portion of the extent of the sill 12 toward the wall panel 20, while urging the panel sections 22 and 26 downwardly against the sill 12 through the spacers 48 and 50. It will be noted in the latter function that the openings in the spacers 48 and 50 through which the tension member 62 passes constitutes a guide means for the tension member 62 by means of which the sections 22 and 26 of the wall panel 20 are urged against the sill 12. In other words, such guide means prevents movement of the wall panel 20 in a direction from the sill 12 relative to the tension member 62.

Tape-red washers 92 and 94 are disposed slidably about the springs 84 and 88, the tapered washer 92 being dis-.

posed intermediate the flat washer 86 and the post 14 with the tapered side thereof bearing against the latter. A coiled compression spring 96 embraces the tension member 62 intermediate the washers 86 and 92 and is biased between such washers. It will be noted that the coiled compression spring 96 losely embraces the coiled compression spring 84 and is preferably wound in the opposite direction. In a similar manner, a coiled compression spring 93 embraces the coiled compression spring 83 and is biased between the washers 94 and 96. It will thus be seen that tightening of the nuts 76 and 78 also serves to yieldingly urge the posts 14 and 16 towards each other and the wall panel 26.

While it is preferred that the tapered washers 8t 82, 92 and 94 be unattached from the spacers 48 and 50 and the posts 14 and 16, they can if desired be fixedly attached in any suitable manner.

The hooks 64-72 can be simple hooks as illustrated, or they can be individually spring loaded hooks, such as shown in US. Patent No. 2,689,987 entitled Coupling Device For Building Structures issued to J. I. Berger September 28, 1954, appropriately recessed into the sill 12.

Though not preferred, spring loading of the hooks 6472 over the tension member 62 can serve to tension the latter, as will be evident to those familiar with the art.

In an analogous manner, an elongated tension member 100 extends through the post 14, the wall panel 20, and the post 16, an intervening portion of the longitudinal extent of the tension member 100 being convex upwardly toward the wall plate 118. As in the case of the tension member 62 and the sill 12, the tension member 180 extends into the confines of the wall plate 18 and is engaged over a plurality of hooks 102 rigidly fixed to the Web portion 104 of the plate 18. As in the case of the hooks 64 through 72, the hooks 102 are of differing lengths so as to establish points of contact with the ten sion member 100 that lie along an upwardly convex arc. Preferably, the tension member 100 is disposed above the horizontal spacer 32, and the opposite end portions of the tension member 100 are provided with means analogous to those shown in FIGURE 4 for applying resilient force against the posts 14 and 16, and against the spacers 48 and 50. The means for applying resilient force against the post 14 and the spacer 48 through the tension member 100 is shown in detail in FIGURE 7, it being understood that similar means are provided at the opposite end of the tension member 100 for applying resilient force against the post 16 and the spacer 50.

Referring to FIGURE 7, it will be seen that an opening 106 is provided in the spacer 48 through which the tension member 100 slidably extends. The tension member 100 slidably extends through an opening 108 in the post 14, and the end portion of the tension member 100 extending through the post 14 is externally threaded and has a nut 110 adjustably threaded thereon. A tapered washer 112 is slidably positioned on the tension member 100, such tape-red washer :112 having the tapered side thereof engaging the spacer 48, it being noted that the diameter of the tapered washer 112 is such that the same can be passed over the end of the tension member 100, passed through the opening 108 and moved into engagement with the spacer 48. A coiled compression spring 114 embraces the tension member 100, such compression spring 114 being slidab-le through the opening 108 and biased between the tapered washer 112 and a flat washer 116 seated against the nut 1 10.

A tapered washer 118 is disposed about the spring 1 14 and has the tapered side thereof engaging the post 14. A coiled compression spring 120 loosely embraces the spring 114 and is biased between the tapered washer 118 and a flat washer 116. As will be noted, the springs 114 and 120 are preferably wound in opposite directions to pre vent their interfering with each other.

Inspection of the structure shown in FIGURE 7 will make it plain that tightening of the nut 1110 applies yielding force against the spacer 48 as well as the post :14 so as to urge such elements toward the post 16 and the panel section 26, while additionally tensioning the tension member 100 so as to urge the intermediate extent of the wall plate 18 toward the wall panel 20. It will therefore be apparent that the tension members 62 and 100 coact to urge the sill 12 and the wall plate 18 against the wall panel 20 in opposition to each other.

Attention is directly to FIGURE 2 wherein the wall is shown as being employed in a building construction resting upon a masonry foundation indicated at 122 and in association with a floor construction designated generally at 124 and with a ceiling or roof construction designated generally at 126. The floor construction 124 is shown as being of double-walled construction including spaced upper and lower walls 128 and 130. The walls 128 and 138 are joined and spaced by spacers such as the one indicated at 132, and insulation 134 (such as indicated as suitable for insulation 52) is disposed between the walls 128 and 130. As shown, the lower wall portion of the floor construction 124 underlies and is sandwiched between the sill 12 and the masonry foundation 122, with the upper wall portion 128 of the floor construction 124 terminating flush against the sill 12.

The ceiling or roof construction 126 is analogous to the floor construction 124, such ceiling construction 126 being comprised of upper and lower spaced wall portions 136 and 138 that are spaced and joined by spacers such as the one indicated at 140. Suitable insulation 142 (such as insulation 52) is disposed between the wall portions 136 and 138. The upper wall portion 136 overlies and rests upon the wall plate 18 as shown (and can be fixedly secured thereto if desired by an suitable means), while the lower wall portion 126 abuts flush against the side of the wall plate 18 as shown, and can be fastened thereto by any suitable means if desired.

It will be appreciated by those skilled. in the art that the use of the wall 10 is not limited to use with floor and ceiling constructions such as shown at 124 and 126, and that any suitable form of foundation such as a vehicle frame can be provided therefor. Also, those skilled in the art will recognize that conventional roof structures, either peaked or flat, can be mounted in any conventional fashion on the wall plate 18 or the wall portion 136 of the ceiling construction 126. Also, walls such as wall 10 can be superposed and secured one upon another to obtain multistoried building structures (not shown).

Attention is now directed to FIGURE 5 wherein the manner in which various wall sections such as previously described can be joined to make inside and outside corners is illustrated. The reference numerals 150, 152 and 154 each respectively designate generally wall sections of the same type as shown in FIGURE 1, this view being taken on a horizontal plane immediately below the lower horizontal spacers of such walls 150, 152 and 154. The reference numeral 156 designates a vertical column or post of integral angular configuration so as to be a post common to the walls and 152 and to define an internal corner in building construction, while the reference numeral 158 designates an integral angular post common to the walls 152 and 154 to define an external corner of building construction.

The post 156 can be a section of angle iron including flanges 160 and 162. It will be noted that the outer wall portions 164 and 166 of the walls 150 and 152 abut directly against the post 156, while the interior wall portions 168 and 170 of the walls 150' and. 152 project to terminate in close proximity to each other so that their junction can be finished by attaching a quarter round 172 thereto. An access opening, not shown, can be provided in either of the wall portions 168 or 170 in order to provide access to the tensioning means 174 and 176.

The post 158 defining an outside corner is comprised of an integral section of angle iron including flanges 178 and 180. The internal wall 170 of the wall 152, and the internal wall portion 182 of the wall 154 abut the post 158, as shown, while the external wall portion 166 of the wall 152 and the external wall portion 184 of the wall 154 project past the post 158 to terminate in close proximity to each other so that the construction can be finished by the provision of a quarter round 186. Either one or both of the wall portions 166 and 184 can be provided with an access opening, not shown, in order to afford access to the tensioning means 188 and 190. Access openings such as may be provided in the wall portions 168, 170, 166 and 184 can, if desired or deemed expedient, be filled in with mortar or any other suitable material after the wall construction has been completed, or such openings can be provided with access doors, not shown, whereby subsesioning means.

As Will be obvious, walls constructed in accordance with the invention can be associated with each other to define corners, or so as to provide straight extensions of each other. In the latter case, posts defining junctures of such Walls can be channel-shaped with such channel opening to the interior of the building to afford access to the tensioning means.

The sills and wall plates employed in the practice of this invention can be of any suitable material such as wood or metal, and similar considerations apply to the materials used in making the walls 28 and 30 of the wall panel 20. If desired, the walls 28 and 3% can be of plywood construction or of any other material conventionally used for exterior and interior walls. Though many other materials would be suitable, it is preferred that the spacers 32, 34, 36, 38, 42, 48 and 50 be made of wood. The tension members 62 and 100 can be long flexible steel rods, and if desired can (except for the threaded end portions thereof, which should be solid) be of flexible steel cable.

Though it is preferred that the securing means including the tension members 62 and 1M be disposed adjacent the upper and lower extremities of the wall panel 20, it will be appreciated that the extremities of the tension members 62 and 100 can be considerably further displaced from the sill 12and the wall plate 18 than as shown, it being necessary only under such circumstances to provide suitable additional openings in the spacers provided in the wall panel 20 for passage of such tension members therethrough. In a similar vein, the angles defined by the extremities of the tension members 62 and 100 with the posts between which they are connected can be quite variable. Though the angle between the tension member 100 and the post 14 shown in FIGURE 7 is somewhat exaggerated, it is feasible that the tension member 100 can depart from being perpendicular to the post 14 by as much as 30 or more degrees. It is preferred that the posts 14 and 16 be of metal.

It is generally preferred that the U-shaped configuration of the sill 12 and the wall plate 18 be continued throughout the extent of such elements as far as possible, though the flange portions of such elements is cut away to the extent necessary to accommodate the posts bearing against the web portion of such U-shaped members.

Though it is generally preferred whenever feasible that the posts be fixedly secured to the sill and to the wall plate, this i not always necessary, especially when such posts define corners such as shown in FIGURE 5. This is for the reason that the tensioning and securing means tend to urge the posts into abutment with the associated sill and wall plate.

It will be evident to those skilled in the art that the illustrated and preferred embodiments of the invention are susceptible to numerous variations in detail without departing from the scope of the invention, and accordingly, attention is directed to the appended claims in order to ascertain the actual scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. An improvement in building construction comprising a first straight frame member with second and third straight frame members extending perpendicularly therefrom, said second and third frame members being spaced apart and defining with said first frame member a U- shaped frame, a rectangular wall panel coplanar with the frame disposed between the second and third frame mem bers and having an edge bearing against the first frame member, an elongated tension member extending through the wall panel and connecting the second and third frame members, said wall panel including guide means receiving the tension member therethrough for limiting movement of the wall panel relative to the tension member in a direction normal to the first frame member, said tension member having an intermediate portion of its extent between the second and third frame members deflected toward the first frame member, means connecting an intermediate portion of the first frame member and said intermediate portion of the tension member for urging said first frame member toward the wall panel, and yielding means including coiled springs operatively connecting the tension member and the second and third frame members for tensioning the tension member between the second and third frame members, whereby the first, second and third frame members are yieldingly unged toward the wall panel.

2. The combination of claim 1, wherein said second and third frame members abut and are separate from said first frame member, whereby tension of said tension member holds said second and third frame members in firm abutment against the first frame member.

3. The combination of claim 1, wherein said means connecting the first frame member and the tension member comprises a plurality of hooks fixed at spaced positions to the first frame member, said hooks engaging the tension member at a plurality of spaced positions situated along an are that is convex toward the first frame member.

4. An improvement in building construction comprising a first straight frame member with second and third straight frame members extendingperpendicularly therefrom, said second and third frame members being spaced apart and defining with said first frame member a U- shaped frame, a rectangular wall panel coplanar with the frame disposed between the second and third frame members and having an edge bearing against the first frame member, an elongated tension member extending through the second frame member, the wall panel and the third frame mmeber, said wall panel having guide means receiving the tension member therethrough for limiting movement of the wall panel relative to the tension member in a direction normal to the first frame member, said tension member having an intermediate portion of its extent deflected toward the first frame member, means connecting an intermediate portion of the first frame member and said intermediate portion of the tension member responsive to tension of the tension memher to urge the wall panel toward the first frame member, said second and third frame members each being provided with guide means receiving opposite end portions of the tension member therethrough, and means adjacent the opposite ends of the tension member engaging portions of the wall panel adjacent the second and third frame members for tensioning said tension member between said portions of the wall panel. 5. The combination of claim 4, wherein said tensionmg means includes a nut adjustably threaded on the tension mmeber and a coiled compression spring on the tension member that is interposed and biased between said nut and one of said portions of the Wall panel.

6. The combination of claim 5, wherein said wall panel is comprised of a plurality of separate sections having abutting junctures therebetween that are parallel to the second and third frame members, whereby the sections of the Wall panel are resiliently retained in abutting relationship with each other. 7. An improvement in building construction comprising first and second straight and parallel spaced frame members, third and fourth straight and parallel spaced frame members extending perpendicularly between the first and second frame members to define therewith an open rectangular frame, a Wall panel coplanar with and disposed within the rectangular frame with a pair of opposed edges of the wall panel seated against the first and second frame members, a first elongated tension member extending between the third and fourth frame mem bers and through the wall panel, said first tension member having an intermediate portion of its extent deflected toward the first frame member, means connecting the Q intermediate portion of the first tension member and an intermediate portion of the first frame member responsive to tension of the first tension member to urge the first frame member toward the wall panel, a second elongated tension member extending between the third and fourth frame members and through the wall panel, said second tension member having an intermediate portion of its extent deflected toward the second frame member, means connecting the intermediate portion of the second tension member and an intermediate portion of the second frame member responsive to tension of the second tension member to urge the second frame toward the wall panel, and yielding means including coiled springs for tensioning the first and second tension members, whereby intermediate portions of the first and second frame members are yieldingly unged and retained against the wall panel in opposition to each other.

8. The combination of claim '7, wherein the opposite ends of the first and second tension members are connected to the third and fourth frame members, whereby the third and fourth frame members are urged toward the wall panel.

9. An improvement in building construction comprising a first straight frame member with second and third straight frame members extending perpendicularly therefrom, said second and third frame members being spaced apart and defining with said first frame member a U- shaped frame, a rectangular wall panel coplanar with the frame disposed between the second and third frame members and having an edge bearing against the first frame member, an elongated tension member extending through the wall panel and connecting the second and third frame members, said tension member having an intermediate portion of its extent between the second and third frame members deflected toward the first frame member, means connecting an intermediate portion of the first frame member and said intermediate portion of the tension member for urging said first frame member toward the wall panel, means for tensioning the tension member between the second and third frame members, whereby the first, second and third frame members are urged toward the wall panel, said means for tensioning the tension member including said tension member having an end slidably extending through the second frame member, a nut adjustably threaded on the tension member, a coiled compression spring on the tension member interposed between and biased between the nut and the second frame member, and a second coiled compression spring on the tension member interposed between and biased between the nut and the wall panel, said first mentioned spring surrounding the second spring with the second frame member having an opening accommodating the latter spring therethrough.

10. An improvement in building construction comprising a first straight frame member with second and third straight frame members extending perpendicularly therefrom, said second and third frame members being spaced apart and defining with said first frame member a U- shaped frame, a rectangular wall panel coplanar with the frame disposed between the second and third frame members and having an edge bearing against the first frame member: an elongated tension member extending through the wall panel and connected to the second and third frame members at positions spaced from the first frame member, said second and third frame members being susceptible to at least a limited extent of movement toward each other at said positions, said tension member throughout a major portion of its extent between the second and third members being deflected toward the first frame member with means connecting such deflected portion of the tension member to the first frame member, and with said tension member being connected to the second and third frame members by means for tensioning the tension member, whereby tensioning of the tension member yielding-1y urges the second and third frame members towards each other and the wall panel and also applies forces against the second and third frame members directed toward the first frame member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,258,952 3/1918 Short 267-71 1,336,446 4/1920 Stone 267-61 1,573,782 2/1926 lorti 287-66 1,791,656 2/1931 Brancart 52-228 2,101,538 12/1937 Faber 52-227 2,279,315 4/ 1942 Hertel 267-70 X 2,618,148 11/1952 Reed 52-229 2,658,748 11/ 1953 Premoli 26766 X 2,769,332 11/1956 Brown 52-262 3,123,349 3/1964 Cislo 267- FOREIGN PATENTS 626,299 1961 Canada. 460,828 1913 France.

References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 996,262 6/ 1911 Kurtz. 1,683,600 9/1928 Black. 2,034,215 3/1936 Stencel. 2,340,864 2/1944 Carpenter. 2,689,987 9/1954 Berger.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner. JACOB L. NACKENOFF, Examiner. J. E. MURTAGH, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3399437 *Apr 11, 1967Sep 3, 1968William F. KellyApparatus for post-tensioning prestressed concrete
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/223.7, 52/457, 267/290, D25/58, 52/204.599, 52/476
International ClassificationE04B1/61
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/6125
European ClassificationE04B1/61D3B