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Publication numberUS3269075 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1966
Filing dateNov 8, 1963
Priority dateNov 8, 1963
Publication numberUS 3269075 A, US 3269075A, US-A-3269075, US3269075 A, US3269075A
InventorsCosden Bryan L, Marini Louis G, Marini Thomas O
Original AssigneeCosden Bryan L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aluminum shingle
US 3269075 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

30, 1965 T. o. MARIN! ETAL 3,269,075

ALUMINUM SHINGLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 8, 1963 INVENTOR6 7/70/1445 Q Mane/A Lou/6 6'. MflE/M/ Ber/4M L. qasaf/v B KJM ATTORNEYS 3 ,269,075 Patented August 30, 1966 3,269,fi75 ALURHNUM SHINGLE Thomas (I). Marini, Haddon Heights, and Louis G. Marini and Bryan L. Cosden, Moorestowu, NJL; said Thomas 0. Marini and Louis G. Marini assignors to Bryan L. Cosden, Medford Lakes, NJ.

Filed Nov. 8, 1963, Ser. No. 322,462 3 @lairns. (1. 52522) This invention relates to building materials and more particularly to an aluminum shingle to be intsalled on the roof of a building and is intended to provide an improvement over the shingle shown in the patent to Korter #2,631,552, issued March 17, 1953, and patent to Sunderhauf #2,568,469, issued September 18, 1951.

Numerous types of aluminum or metallic shingles have heretofore been proposed, but considerable dimculty has been experienced in making such shingles completely leakproof and particularly in preventing leakage due to moisture being blown up under the overlapping edges of the shingles and particularly at the upper edge of the joint or seam between two laterally adjacent shingles. Furthermore, since condensation tends to collect on the under surface of metallic shingles, some means must be provided for draining away such condensation to avoid the possibility of leakage thereof to the structure beneath the shingles and the structure shown in the Korter patent, identified above, illustrates one attempt which has been made to dispose of condensation moisture in a harmless manner. Some ditficulty has also been experienced in laying prior 'art metallic shingles, in that no means was provided for ensuring that adjacent shingles were completely interlocked or no means for indicating to the workmen that the shingles were properly assembled when laying the same on a roof. This often resulted in the laying of shingles in which the joints therebetween were not completely closed, thereby presenting further possibilities of leakage, and also tending to destroy the uniform appearance of the shingles on a roof.

Another disadvantage which has been encountered in the use of metallic shingles of the type shown in the Korter patent is the lack of rigidity in the shingle, and the fact that only one nailing point is provided for each shingle which results in securing all of the shingles on a roof With relatively few nails. Due to the relative flexibility of the Korter shingle, which results from the fact that the length is approximately twice the width, and the relatively few nailing points, a high wind frequently rips these shingles from the roof.

The shingle of the present invention serves to overcome the disadvantages mentioned above and provides additional advantages when compared to prior metallic shingles in which the width is approximately twice the height, in that due to the provision of a shingle in which the width is substantially equal to the height there is less flutter and scalloping effect when subjected to high winds and furthermore, expansion and contraction as the result of temperature changes which takes place in each individual shingle is confined to a smaller area and is dissipated throughout the shorter perimeter of the lock means. This materially contributes to the elimination of noise due to expansion and contraction and also materially reduces the possibility of elongation of the nail holes and possible loosening of the nails due to such expansion and contraction. Also the smaller shingle of this invention results in the provision of more shadow lines on the roof thereby presenting a more pleasing appearance.

It is accordingly an object of this invention to provide an aluminum shingle having means to prevent leakage of windblown moisture upwardly between the joints of adjacent shingles and particularly at the upper end of the joint between laterally adjacent shingles.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle having an integral fastening tab as a part thereof and in which such tab is formed in a manner to prevent leakage of windblown moisture upwardly be tween adjacent shingles at the upper end of the joint between laterally adjacent shingles.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle including means for collecting moisture condensing on the under surface of the shingle and for draining away such moisture in a harmless manner.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle of rectangular formation and having interlocking seams along the side, bottom and top edges and with such seams being of the snap type to securely hold adjacent shingles in interlocking relationship and also to provide a definite, audible indication of the workman when the shingles are assembled in a manner to provide a leakproof seam or joint and with the shingles assembled in a manner to provide a uniform pleasing appearance.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle having means in the form of a gutter along the underside of the lower edge to collect moisture condensing and flowing downwardly along the under surface of the shingle and in which means is provided to space the adjacent upper shingle a slight distance above the surface of the adjacent lower shingle in order to permit free flow of condensation moisture along the lower surface of the shingle into the gutter in which a drain opening is provided to drain away such moisture in a harmless manner.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle in which the length is approximately equal to the width, thereby providing a substantially square shingle having relatively great rigidity, and further providing approximately twice the number of nailing points for a given area when compared to conventional aluminum shingles.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle which is substantially smaller in area than a conventional aluminum shingle thereby resulting in less flutter and scallo-ping effect when subjected to high winds.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle which is substantially smaller in area than a conventional aluminum shingle thereby confining expansion and contraction due to changes in temperature to a smaller area when compared to conventional aluminum shingles which materially contributes to the elimination of noise, as well as materially reducing the possibility of elongation of the nail holes or loosening of the nails.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle which is substantially smaller in area than a conventional aluminum shingle thereby providing a greater number of shadow lines on the roof which serves to present a more pleasing appearance.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of an aluminum shingle which may be conveniently and economically manufactured from sheet aluminum material by relatively simple, stamping, cutting and bending or folding operations.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a blank from which the shingle of this invention is formed and shows such blank after stamping and cutting, but prior to the bending or folding operations for forming the joint portions on the side, top and bottom edges;

FIG. 2 a plan view similar to FIG. 1, but showing the completed shingle;

FIG. 3 a sectional view taken substantially on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and showing the formation of the joints at the side edges, as well as the corrugation pattern of the main portion of the shingle;

FIG. 4 a sectional view taken substantially on the line 4--4 of FIG. 2 and showing the formation of the joints at the upper and lower edges of the shingle;

FIG. 5 a plan view showing two shingles constructed in accordance with this invention and in the relative position occupied when laid on a roof;

FIG. 6 a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on the line 66 of FIG. 5 and showing the snap-type interlocking joint between two courses of shingles and also showing the position of the drain opening in the gutter at the lower edge of the shingle;

BIG. 7 a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on the line 7--7 of FIG. 5 and showing the manner in which the lower surface of an upper shingle is spaced slightly above the joint portion of the next lower shingle in order to permit a drainage of condensation moisture along the under surface of the upper shingle into the gutter at the lower edge thereof;

FIG. 8 a sectional view taken substantially on the line 8-8 of FIG. 7 and further showing the manner of spacing the upper shingle from the lower shingle to permit drainage of condensation moisture; and

FIG. 9 a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 6, but show-ing a slightly modified form of snap-type interlocking joint.

With continued reference to the drawings and particularly FIG. 1, there is shown a blank 10 from which the shingle of this invention is constructed and such blank 10 may well be formed by suitable stamping and cutting operations from a sheet of aluminum or other suitable metallic material and as shown in FIG. 1, the blank 10 is generally rectangular in configuration and the central portion 11 thereof is corrugated in substantially the same manner as the shingle shown in the Sunderhauf patent, identified above, and such corrugations may, if desired, simulate the appearance of a wood shingle. Also as clearly shown in FIG. 1, the corrugated central portion 11 of the blank 10 terminates inwardly of the side edges to provide plain side edge portions 12 and 13, a plain lower edge portion 14 and a plain upper edge portion 15. A generally V-shaped notch 16 is provided in the side edge portion 12 adjacent the upper end thereof and as best shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the side edge portion is folded over along the line 17 to overlie the upper surface 18 of the central portion 11 and the folded over, reversely bent side portion 12 extends toward the upper surface 18 of the central portion 11 and merges into a smooth curve 24 adjacent the upper surface 18 and thereafter extends away from the upper surface 18 to provide a camming portion 25 and the smooth curved portion 24, as well as the camming portion 25 serve to provide one part 26 of a snap-type interlocking seam, the purpose and operation of which will be later described.

In a similar manner, the side edge portion 13 is folded or reversely bent along the line 22 to underlie the lower surface 23 of the central portion 11 and as clearly shown in FIG. 3, the reversely bent portion 13 extends toward the underside 23 of the central portion 11 and merges into a smooth curved portion 19 adjacent the under surface 23 and thereafter extends away from such under surface to provide a camming portion 20 thereby providing one par-t 21 of a snap-type interlocking seam, the purpose and operation of which will be later described.

A generally V-shaped notch 27 is provided adjacent one end of the lower edge portion 14 and the opposite end of the lower edge portion 14 is cut on a bevel, as shown at 28. Also provided in the lower edge portion 14 is an aperture 29, the purpose of which will be later described. The lower edge portion 14 is folded or reversely bent along the line 30 to underlie the lower side 23 of the central portion 11 and as shown in FIG. 4, the reversely bent lower edge portion 14 extends toward the lower surface 23 and merges into a smooth curved portion 31 adjacent the lower surface 23 and thereafter extends away from the lower surface 23 to provide a cam portion 32. The curved portion 31, together with the cam portion 32 form one part 33 of a snap-type interlocking seam and also serve to provide a gutter 34 at the lower underside of the sheet or shingle 10 and the aperture 29 provides a drain for the gutter 34.

At the end of upper edge portion 15 adjacent the side edge portion 13 is a generally rectangular notch 35 and inwardly of the opposite end of upper edge portion 15 is a generally V-shaped notch 36. Outwardly of the V-shaped notch 36 and forming an extension of a portion of the upper edge 15 is a generally rectangular fastening tab 37. Upper edge portion 15, together with the fastening tab '37 are folded or reversely bent along the line 38 to overlie the upper surface 18 of the central portion 11 and as shown in FIG. 4, the reversely bent upper edge portion 15 extends toward the upper surface 11 to a smooth curved portion 39 adjacent the upper surface 18 and thereafter extends away from such surface to provide a camming portion 40. The reversely bent upper edge portion 15, together with the curved portion 39 and the camming portion 40 provide one part of a snap-type interlocking seam 41.

As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 7, the fastening tab 37 is reversely bent along the line 42 in such a manner that the upper edge 43 of the fastening tab 37 is disposed in wardly beyond the edge of the interlocking seam portion 41 and also as shown in FIG. 2, the fastening tab 37 projects laterally beyond the side interlocking seam portion 21 and also as clearly shown in FIG. 2, the reversely bent fastening tab 37 serves to close the upper end of the channel formed by the interlocking seam portion 21 to prevent leakage of moisture with a protuberance 44 on the upper face thereof, the purpose of which will be presently described and also, if desired, the fastening tab 37 may be provided with an aperture 45 for receiving a nail or other suitable fastening means. If desired, the aperture 45 may be omitted and a nail driven directly through the material of the fastening tab 37. FIG. 7 shows the manner in which a nail 46 is driven through the aperture 45 in the fastening tab 37 and into a roof structure 47 to secure the shingle thereto.

As best shown in FIGS. 5, 6, 7 and 8, the shingles of this invention are laid on a roof in the usual pattern and in order to provide for proper location of the shingles a die mark 48 may be provided on the upper interlocking seam portion 41 and this mark is utilized in a manner to be now described. The shingles are laid on courses from the lower edge of the roof upwardly as is common practice and as shown in FIGS. 5 and 7, a lower shingle 49 which is a part of a lower course of shingles is laid on the roof and secured thereto by the nail 46 extending through the aperture 45 of the fastening tab 37 and into the roof structure 47. It is, of course, understood that laterally adjacent shingles are secured to one another by interlocking of the adjacent side edge seam portions 21 and 26. An upper shingle 50 which is part of a second course of shingles interlocked together by the side beam portions 21 and 26 is laid on the roof with the side edge seam portion 26 in alignment with the die mark 43 and with the lower interlocking seam portion 33 of the upper shingle 50 interlocking with the upper interlocking seam portion 41 of the lower shingle 49. As clearly shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the protuberance 44 on the upper base of the fastening tab 37 engages the lower surface 23 of the upper shingle 50 to space such lower surface 23 above the adjacent upper surface of the upper interlocking seam portion 41 thereby providing a drainage space 51 between the upper surface of the upper seam portion 41 and the lower surface 23 of the upper shingle 50. In this manner, moisture condensing on lower surface 23 of the upper shingle 59 may flow downwardly therealong and into the gutter 34 formed by the lower interlocking seam portion 3 3 on the upper shingle 50 and such moisture may flow along the gutter 34- and out through the drain opening or aperture 29 and on the upper surface 18 of the lower shingle 49. This serves to dispose of condensation moisture and as described above, the reversely bent fastening tab 37 closes any opening occurring at the upper end of the side interlocking seam portion 2 1 and also any opening occurring at this point between laterally adjacent shingles and, therefore, any possibility of moisture blowing upwardly through an opening at this point is prevented, thereby assuring a dry roof structure.

A slightly modified form of snap-type interlocking seam to be utilized between adjacent shingles is shown in FIG. 9 and as shown therein, a lower interlocking seam portion 52 is formed by the reversely bent lower edge of the shingle 53 which extends toward the iower surface 54 of the shingle 53 along a straight line, as shown at 55, and extends to a point 56 adjacent the lower surface 54 and thereafter away from such surface in a straight line and at an angle to provide a camming portion 57. The upper interlocking seam portion 58 of a lower shingle 50 is provided in the same manner with a portion 60 extending in a straight line toward the upper surface 61 of the lower shingle 59 to a point 62 adjacent the upper surface 61 and thereafter extending away from such surface at an angle in a straight line to provide a camming portion 63. The shingles provided with this modified form of interlocking seam are utilized and laid in the same manner as the shingles described above.

The interlocking seam portions operate by engaging the adjacent camming portions to spread the seam portions apart thereby permitting the same to move together with a snap-action which serves to ecurely interlock the shingles together and at the same time, provides an audible signal due to the snap-action which indicates to the workmen that the shingles are properly assembled.

It is to be noted that the shingle of this invention is approximately square, with the actual dimensions being of the order of nine and three quarters inches long and eight and three quarters inches wide. This serves to provide a shingle having relatively great rigidity, particularly when compared to conventional aluminum shingle of the Korter type in which the dimensions are eighteen inches long and nine and one-half inches wide.

While it is necessary to utilize a greater number of shingles of the present invention to cover a given area when compared to the Korter shingle, this disadvantage is overcome by the provision of twice the number of nailing points for a given area which together with the increased rigidity mentioned above, provides a roof capable of withstanding high wind velocities.

The above described aluminum shingle is relatively simple and economical to construct and may be conveniently and rapidly laid to provide a weather-tight roof of pleasing appearance having a pronounced shadow line between adjacent course and also serving to dispose of condensation moisture in a harmless manner and, at the same time, prevent the entry of windblown moisture beneath the shingles and into the roof structure.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof and therefore the invention is not limited by that which is shown in the drawings and described in the specifications, but only as indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An aluminum shingle of rectangular shape, said shingle comprising a sheet of metal with one side edge reversely bent to overlie the upper face of said sheet and the opposite side edge reversely bent to underlie the lower face of said sheet to provide means for interlocking laterally adjacent shingles, the lower edge of said sheet being reversely bent to underlie the lower face of said sheet to provide means for interlocking said shingle with the adjacent lower shingle and to provide a gutter for receiving moisture, the lower wall of said gutter having an aperture therein adjacent one end for draining moisture from said gutter, the upper edge of said sheet being reversely bent to overlie the upper face of said sheet to provide means for interlocking said shingle with the adjacent upper shingle and an integral fastening tab at the upper corner of said sheet adjacent said one side edge, said tab comprising an extension of said reversely bent upper edge projecting outwardly of the adjacent reversely bent side edge, said extension overlying the upper end of the adjacent reversely bent side edge to close the upper end of the channel formed thereby to prevent upward flow of moisture to the underside of said shingle, a portion of said extension being bent upwardly in the opposite direction of, and along a bend which is parallel to, said reversely bent upper edge to project up beyond said reversely bent upper edge, and a small protuberance on the upper face of said tab and overlaying said reversely bent upper edge for engaging the lower face of the adjacent upper shingle to space the same from the upper face of the adjacent reversely bent upper edge to permit moisture to flow downwardly along the lower face of the adjacent upper shingle and into said gutter.

2. An aluminum shingle of rectangular shape, said shingle comprising a sheet of metal with one side edge reversely bent to overlie the upper face of said sheet and the opposite side edge reversely bent to underlie the lower face of said sheet to provide means for interlocking laterally adjacent shingles, the lower edge of said sheet being reversely bent to underlie the lower face of said sheet to provide means for interlocking said shingle with the adjacent lower shingle, the upper edge of said sheet being reversely bent to overlie the upper face of said sheet to provide means for interlocking said shingle with the adjacent upper shingle and an integral fastening tab at the upper corner of said sheet adjacent said one side edge, said tab comprising an extension of said reversely bent upper edge projecting outwardly of the adjacent reversely bent side edge, said extension overlying the upper end of the adjacent reversely bent side edge to close the upper end of the channel formed thereby to prevent upward flow of moisture to the underside of said shingle, and a portion of said extension being bent upwardly in the opposite direction of, and along a bend which is parallel to, said reversely bent upper edge to project up beyond said reversely bent upper edge.

3. An aluminum shingle as defined .in claim 2, in which at least said lower and upper edges of said reversely bent edges extend toward and to an abrupt bend line parallel to its edge and adjacent the face of said sheet and thereafter extend away from said sheet at an angle to provide a camming portion for engaging a similar camming portion on adjacent shingles, the angle between the portion extending toward said face and the portion extending away from said face providing a relatively sharp ridge at said abrupt bend line to provide a snap-type interlocking seam with the adjacent shingles.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,173,774 9/1939 Birch et al. 52-522 2,243,256 5/1941 Miller 52-530 2,568,469 9/1951 Sunderhauf 52-748 X 2,631,552 3/1953 Korter 52530 2,830,546 4/1958 Ripple 52-522 3,157,003 11/1964 Domar 52-531 FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

RICHARD W. COOKE, JR., Examiner.

L. R. RADANOVIC, A. C. PERHAM,

Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2173774 *Dec 20, 1937Sep 19, 1939Birch Neil LStrip shingle
US2243256 *Apr 25, 1938May 27, 1941Miller Thomas DMetal roof covering
US2568469 *Jan 6, 1948Sep 18, 1951Reynolds Metals CoRoofing
US2631552 *Jan 9, 1950Mar 17, 1953Korter Louis JAluminum shingle
US2830546 *Apr 13, 1956Apr 15, 1958Dondeville Proudcts Co IncShingle
US3157003 *Jun 16, 1961Nov 17, 1964U S Aluminum Siding CorpSheet metal siding
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3312031 *Apr 4, 1966Apr 4, 1967Kaiser Aluminium Chem CorpShingle structure with reentrant joint configurations and a nailing tab
US3347001 *Mar 3, 1965Oct 17, 1967Cosden Bryan LRoof shingle with interlocking flanges and locator
US3402526 *Jun 26, 1967Sep 24, 1968Koppers Co IncModular collector electrode for electrostatic precipitators
US4096679 *May 27, 1977Jun 27, 1978Paul NazSelf-compensating two-piece siding or roofing slat
US4538391 *Oct 17, 1983Sep 3, 1985Chicago Metallic CorporationMetal building panels for wall applications
US5613337 *May 24, 1995Mar 25, 1997Vail Metal Systems, LlcMetal shingle with gutter and interlocking edges
US6173546Aug 28, 1998Jan 16, 2001James P SchaferInterlocking metal shingle
US6349506Jun 17, 1999Feb 26, 2002Artistic View, Inc.Shingle with integral gutter screen
US6505451 *Jun 21, 2000Jan 14, 2003George KsajikianInterconnecting plate system and method and structures formed therewith
US6619006 *Mar 28, 2002Sep 16, 2003Muneyasu ShirotaRoofing shingle
US6883290Feb 20, 2002Apr 26, 2005Powerlight CorporationShingle system and method
US7178295 *Feb 20, 2002Feb 20, 2007Powerlight CorporationShingle assembly
US7331150 *Mar 11, 2005Feb 19, 2008Davinci Roofscapes, LlcShingle with interlocking water diverter tabs
US7520098Jan 18, 2005Apr 21, 2009Davinci Roofscapes, LlcStepped tile shingle
US7563478Feb 17, 2005Jul 21, 2009Davinci Roofscapes, LlcSynthetic roofing shingles
US7845141Dec 20, 2007Dec 7, 2010Davinci Roofscapes, LlcShingle with interlocking water diverter tabs
US8590270 *Nov 2, 2010Nov 26, 2013Davinci Roofscapes, LlcShingle with interlocking water diverter tabs
USRE38210 *Mar 25, 1999Aug 12, 2003Vail Metal Systems, LlcMetal shingle with gutter and interlocking edges
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/522, 52/530, D25/139, 52/302.1, 52/521, 52/534
International ClassificationE04D1/06, E04D1/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/025, E04D1/06
European ClassificationE04D1/02D, E04D1/06