Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3269389 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1966
Filing dateMar 11, 1963
Priority dateMar 11, 1963
Publication numberUS 3269389 A, US 3269389A, US-A-3269389, US3269389 A, US3269389A
InventorsFisher William L, Meurer Bernard L
Original AssigneeFisher William L, Meurer Bernard L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compartmental dispensing container for nose and throat preparations
US 3269389 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 30, 1966 B. 1.. MEURER E AL 3,259,359

COMPARTMENTAL DISPENSING CONTAINER FOR NOSE AND THROAT PREPARATIONS Filed March 11, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 B. L. M50125? 3,269,389 FOR Aug 30, W66 13. 1... MEURER ET AL COMPARTMENTAL DISPENSING CONTAINER NOSE AND THROAT PREPARATIONS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 11, 1965 Uwavmm Wm MM 1. Hams/2 .5 4. MEUQER United States Patent CUMPARTMENTAL DISPENSING CONTAINER FOR NOSE AND THROAT PREPARATIONS Bernard L. Meurer and William L. Fisher, both of Adair, Howa Filed Mar. 11, 1963, Ser. No. 264,421 8 Claims. (Cl. 128-198) This application is a continuation-in-part of our two co-pending applications, Serial No. 114,528, filed June 2,

1961 (which was a continuation-in-part of our application, Serial No. 41,343, filed July 7 ,1960); and Serial No. 58,641 filed September 27, 1960. These applications are abandoned. The latter application was directed to a nose and throat preparation, and the former application relates to a multi-nratter dispensing container.

This invention relates to a preparation for the treatment of certain nose and throat ailments and more particularly related to two separate non-compatible fluids which are simultaneously sprayed or otherwise applied to the afflicted areas at the time of use. In addition, this invention relates to a dispensing container capable of successfully holding and simultaneously dispensing at least two incompatible materials or fluids.

There are many instances where two given materials or fluids cannot be mixed prior to time of use. As an illustration, it is often necessary to successfully treat a head cold by using two or more non-compatible chemicals. If these two chemicals were previously placed together in a container, one or both would be neutralized by the other, or a chemical reaction might well take place and produce a highly undesirable fluid. The use of plastic squeeze bottles are now in general usage, but obviously when two non compatible fluids are needed, the only solution to the problem herebefore has been the use of two separate containers. This is not only objectionable, but it well may be difficult to obtain at time of use the proper proportions of the two separate chemicals.

One almost universal shortcoming of present day nose and throat spray formulas is that they do not loosen and raise deposits and membranes so that the antiseptic ingredients can directly attack the wounds or inflamed skin tissues. The problem, of course, is that a gas producing agent for raising the deposits or like of the afllicted area would in most cases be non-compatible with many antiseptic agents,

Therefore, one of the principal objects of our invention is to provide a single flexible resilient unit container that will successfully hold in separate compartments two non-compatible products until they have been separately but simultaneously exited from the container.

A further object of this invention is to provide a materiai or fluid dispensing container that is capable of exiting two separate streams of two separate materials or fluids, with the volume of each relative to the volume of the other.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a a double compartment spray bottle unit that may be easily filled with liquids at any time.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a spray nozzle for liquid containers that mixes the liquid with air just prior to, or simultaneous with, the exiting of the liquid.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a spray bottle that is completely closed at its nozzle end by its detachable cap.

A still further object of our invention is to provide a double chemical dispensing container unit that is economical in manufacture, durable in use and refined in appearance.

A still further object of our invention is to provide a preparation consisting of two separated non-compatible solutions that are brought together only at time of use or directly before use so that one solution will not neutralize or kill the other.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a preparation that will eiiectively kill or render impotent objectionable germs in the nose and throat passageways.

A still further object of our invention is to provide a nose and throat preparation that not only successfully destroys cold germs, flu and virus, but de-toxifies the entire body thereby relieving inflammatory conditions that may be caused by such cold germs and/or virus.

Still further objects of our invention are to provide an effective nose and throat preparation for the treatment of afliicted areas that is economical in manufacture and safe in use.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

Our invention consists in the construction arrangements, and combination, of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, specifically pointed out in our claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view of our complete bottle unit,

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of our device taken on line 2-2 of FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a perspective exploded view of the nose piece, the adapter head, the upper portion of the two containers that make up the bottle unit and tubes,

FIG. 4 is a modified form of our invention showing a specific means for securing the bottle elements together,

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the device in FIG. 4 taken on line 55 of that figure when the bottle elements are secured to each other,

FIG. 6 is another form of our invention showing another means for securing the bottle elements together,

FIG. 7 is a top view of the bottles of FIG. 6 in assembled condition,

FIG. 8 is a schematic view of a further form of our invention wherein the separate bottles are secured together by a frictional band, and

FIG. 9 is a top elevational view of the assembled bottles of FIG. 8.

In these drawings, we have used the numerals 10 and 11 to designate the two containers that. go to make up the bottle unit. Each container is a duplicate of the other in that each has a flat side and an outer curved side. These two containers are secured together (with their two flat sides together) by a collar tray 12 that embraces and retains their bottom areas as shown in FIG. 2. On the upper end of each container is a neck portion 13 having a flat side flush with the flat side of the container of which it is a part. These two adjacent neck portions of the two compartments form. a circular neck as shown in FIG. 3 and around which are external threads 15. Detachably threaded onto these threads 15 is a cap member 16 having an inside flat top 17 as shown in FIG. 2.

The neck portion 13 of each container has an enclosing fiat top 19. The numeral 20 designates a hole in the top 19 of the neck portion of the container 1t) and the numeral 21 designates a hole in the top 19 of the neck portion of the container 11.

The bottle unit is of flexible resilient plastic material and to obtain matter therefrom it is manually squeezed in the usual manner. The bottle unit will obviously have two compartments 22 and 23. The compartment 22 will contain one material or fluid and the compartment 23 will contain a different material or fluid. The numeral 25 generally designates the adapter head. On the bottom of the adapter head are two spaced apart downwardly extending cylindrical lugs 26 and 27. These two lugs 26 and 27 frictionally detachably extend through the holes 21 and 22 respectively.

Extending through the lug 26 and the adapter head is a passageway 29. Extending through the lug 27 and the adapter head is a passageway 30. By this arrangement of parts the vertical passageway 29 communicates with the inside top of the compartment 22 and the vertical passageway 30 communicates with the inside top of the compartment 23. Completely across the top of the adapter head 25 is a cross groove 31. The numeral 32 designates a peripheral collar on the adapter head and positioned below its upper plane as shown in FIG. 3. The numeral 33 generally designates the nose or nozzle part. This part 33 has a downwardly extending skirt that detachably embraces the upper end area of the adapter head and engages and is stopped from downward sliding movement by the collar 32. The main portion of the nozzle is cone shaped and has a flat top surface 34. The diameter of the nozzle 33 is sufiicient to completely fill the nostril of a user when the device is used as a nose spray. The numeral 35 designates a downwardly extending cross bar in the lower portion of the nozzle 33 and which fits into the adapter head slot 31 when the device is assembled.

At one side of the cross bar 35 is an upwardly extending passageway 36 exiting through a raised projection 39 on the flat top 34 of the nozzle 33.

At the other side of the cross bar 35 is an upwardly extending passageway 37 exiting through a raised projection 40 on the flat top 34 of the nozzle.

When the cap 16 is screwed onto the neck 13, it will embrace the nozzle 33 and its inside flat top 17 will engage the projections 39 and 40, thus closing the passageways 36 and 37.

The numeral 41 designates a flexible plastic conduit having its outer surface longitudinally ribbed. When the unit is assembled, this conduit will extend from the inside bottom of the compartment 22, loosely upwardly through the hole 20, loosely through the hole passageway 29 and into the passageway 36. The end of the conduit that extends into the passageway 36 will frictionally engage the same and be held therein. The numeral 42 designates a second flexible plastic conduit having its outer surface longitudinally ribbed. This conduit 42 extends from the inside bottom of the compartment 23, loosely upwardly through the hole 21, loosely upwardly through the hole passageway 30 and frictionally into the passageway 37.

In FIGS. 4 through 9, we have shown containers 10A, 11A, 10B, 11B, 10C and 11C which are all substantially identical to containers 10 and 11, respectively. However, container 10A has four lugs 44 on the outer center face 45 thereof which are detachably and frictionally received in registering slots 46 in container 11A. Similarly, in FIGS. 6 and 7, the shoulders 46' on the vertical sides of container 11B are slidably and frictionally received in the registering grooves 48 on the vertical sides of container 10B. A continuous flexible frictional band 48' detachably frictionally embraces the containers 10C and 11C in FIGS. 8 and 9. Thus all of these containers can be easily detached from each other as the occasion requires.

As before indicated, our preparation has at least two solutions that are not compatible and, therefore, they cannot be mixed and bottled together any substantial period of time prior to use. These two solutions are hydrogen peroxide and boric acid. Both hydrogen peroxide and boric acid are well known and recognized as of value in the clinical field. However, if a hydrogen peroxide solution is placed with a boric acid solution, the boric acid solution is rapidly neutralized and killed by the hydrogen peroxide.

It is well known that hydrogen peroxide is a cleansing agent for suppurating wounds and like. It is especially useful for this purpose because it develops a gas which tends to loosen and lift adhering deposits. Quite possibly the cleansing action of hydrogen peroxide in wounds is due to its ability to remove organic detritus which forms a breeding place for the micro-organisms, although hydrogen peroxide does have an antibacterial styptic action. Also, the use of hydrogen peroxide produces rapid coagulation, and in general may be considered as an antiseptic as it kills bacteria upon contact. Hydrogen peroxide is evanescent and when applied to human tissues is a mild irritant that stimulates the metabolism of the tissues.

A boric acid solution, as well as benzoic acid, is a highly desirable antiseptic and weak solutions thereof are even used for the treatment of inflamed eyes. Furthermore, boric acid is not evanescent as hydrogen peroxide, but persists until washed away by natural secretion of the body. Boric acid, conversely to the irritating nature of hydrogen peroxide, soothes the tissues. Other helpful solutions such as diphenhydramine HCl and phenylephrine HCl are used along with the boric acid. Also a small amount of oil of peppermint may be used with both the boric acid and the hydrogen peroxide. The relative percentage amounts by weigth of the materials used may be changed but from experimentation we recommend that the two batches of solutions be prepared substantially as follows.

First Solution Percent by weight Hydrogen peroxide (.225 gm.) 1.5000 Distilled water (14.7748 gm.) 98.4987

Oil of peppermint (.0002 gm.) .0013

Second Solution Boric acid (.3200 gm.) .2133 Benzoic acid (.00200 gm.) .0133 Diphenhydrarnine HCl (.02500 gm.) .1666 Phenylephrine HCl (.00025 gin.) .0016 Oil of peppermint (.00020 gm.) .0013 Distilled water (14.94055 gm.) 99.0039

From the above it will be seen that our nose and throat preparation consists of two seperate solutions but which are placed together into one composition at time of use. This may be accomplished by placing the first solution itno one of the compartments 22 or 23, and by placing the second solution into the other compartment 22 or 23.

By the above-described arrangement of parts, when the cap is removed and the bottle unit squeezed, liquid from the compartment 22 will be forced through the conduit 41 and out of the passageway 36 and liquid from the compartment 23 will be forced through the conduit 42 and out of the passageway 37. However and due to the longitudinal ribbing of the conduits, air will also mix with and exit with the liquid being sprayer or atomized. The squeezing of the bottle unit will force air in the upper end of the compartment 22, to pass through the hole 20, hole passageway 29, and between the ribs of the conduit 41, into and out of the passageway 36. In the same manner air will be forced from the upper part of the compartment 23, through the hole 21, through the hole passageway 30, and between the ribs of the conduit 42, into and out of the passageway 37.

To fill, or refill the compartments of the bottle with suitable liquids, the parts are removed as shown in FIG. 3, and the liquids poured through the holes 29 and 30, respectively. By the lug projections 26 and 27 extending into the holes 20 and 21, respectively, the upper ends of the containers 10 and 11 will be held together. The diameter of the conduit 41 and conduit 42 should be substantially less than that of the inside diameters of the holes 20, 21, 29 and 30.

For the unit to function, and for the various parts to frictionally yieldingly hold together in assembled condition the material of which they are made should have some resiliency and flexibility. Suitable plastic such as linear polyethylene or the like is recommended.

As the hole passageways 29 and 30 are further apart from each other than the exit holes 36 and 37 are from each other, the upper end portions of the conduits 41 and 42 are bent inwardly and toward each other, thereby making the frictional holding of the upper ends of the conduits in the hole passageways 36 and 37, more successful.

When the two solutions are placed together and into a single solution for use, all of the products will be reduced one-half by the weight shown in the above illustration of the two solutions so that the final product will be designated by 100 percent by Weight.

When the product is used, both solutions are effective to kill bacteria in the nasal and throat passages sprayed thereby. Additionally, a by-product of the combined spraying occurs in that the mildly irritating effect of the hydrogen peroxide on the tissues is counteracted by the action of the boric acid thereon. Whereas boric acid continues its anti-bacterial activity, it simultaneously acts to soothe the irritated tissues.

Thus, a continuous, sequential irritating and soothing action on the tissues occurs, increasing the metabolism and thereby increasing the blood supply to the affected tissues. These tissues are consequently rendered healthier and more capable of self anti-bacterial activity. By this one-two type treatment of the affiic-ted areas, the bacteria are not only killed, but an unfavorable breeding ground has been established.

The use of our product is excellent prior to any atfliction inasmuch as it will render the 'areas of the body objectionable to germs, virus and like. Although we have discussed our product as particularly desirable for the treatment of the nose and throat, obviously it may be used on other areas of the body. Thus, from the foregoing, it is seen that our invention will accomplish at least all of its stated obgiectives.

Some changes may be made in our invention without departing from the real spirit and purpose of our inven tion and it is our intention to cover by our claims any modified solutions, structures or equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

We claim:

1. In a bottle,

a resilient container having a one-half neck portion with a hole in its top,

a second resilient container having a one-half neck portion with a hole in its top,

said two containers being adjacent and their two onehalf neck portions forming together a cylindrical neck portion,

a nozzle having two outlet passageways operatively secured to said cylinderical neck portion,

a flexible conduit extending from inside said first container, loosely through the hole in its half neck portion and into one of the outlet passageways of said nozzle and a flexible conduit extending from inside said second container, loosely through the hole in its half neck portion, and into the other outlet passageway of said nozzle; and

said two holes in said neck portion being of a distance apart, greater than that of the distance between the two outlet passageways of said nozzle.

2. In a bottle,

a resilient container having a one-half neck portion with a hole in its top,

a second resilient con-tainer having a one-half neck portion with a hole in its top,

said two containers being adjacent and their two onehalf neck portions forming together a cylindrical neck portion,

a head member having a lug extending downwardly in the hole of one of said one-half neck portions and having a second lug extending downwardly in the hole of the other said one-half neck portion,

said first lug and head member having a passageway extending through them,

said second lug and head member having a passageway extending through them,

a nozzle having two outlet passageways,

a conduit extending from inside said first container, loosely through the passageway in said first lug and head member and into one of the outlet passageways of said nozzle,

a conduit extending from inside said second container, loosely through the passageway in said second lug and head member and into the other passageway of said nozzle,

and a means for securing said nozzle to said head memher.

3. In a bottle.

a resilient container having a one-half neck portion with a hole in its top,

a second resilient container having a one-half neck portion with a hole in its top,

said two containers being adjacent and their two onehalf neck portions forming together a cylindrical neck portion,

a head member having a lug extending downwardly in the hole of one of said one half neck portions and having a second lug extending downwardly in the hole of the other said one-half neck portion,

said head member having a groove formed in its upper end extending diametrically thereof,

said first lug and head member having a passageway extending through them,

said second lug and head member having a passageway extending through them,

a nozzle having two outlet passageways,

a cross-bar extending longitudinally of said nozzle and between said two outlet passageways,

said bar adapted to be received in said groove in said head member,

a conduit extending from inside said first container, loosely through the passageway in said first lug and head member and into one of the outlet passageways of said nozzle, and

a conduit extending from inside said second container, loosely through the passageway in said second lug and head member and into the other passageway of said nozzle.

4. In a bottle of unitary construction and a first container having a fluid compartment and a onehalf neck portion at its upper end, said first container having an opening in its upper end,

a second container having a fluid compartment and a one-half neck portion at its upper end, said second container having an opening in its upper end,

said first and second containers being detachable from each other,

said first and second containers being of identical construction and being positioned in side by side relationship,

a single nozzle means having two outlet passageways with separate conduits extending from the passageways through the said openings into one each of said fluid compartments,

and means detachably securing said containers in side by side relationship.

5. The bottle of claim 4 wherein said means detachably securing said containers in side by side relationship includes lugs on one container detach-ably frictionally inserted into registering slots on the other container.

6. The bottle of claim 4 wherein said means detachably securing said containers in side by side relationship includes shoulders on one contaner inserted into registering grooves on the other container.

7. The bottle of claim 4 wherein said means detach- 7 8 ably securing said containers in side by side relationship 2,661,870 12/ 1953 Huenergardt 222129 includes a band frictionally detachably embracing said 2,876,935 3/1959 Lindberg 222145 first and second containers. 2,941,696 6/ 1960 Homm 222-394 X 8. The bottle of claim 4 wherein said means detach- 3,079,299 2/ 1963 Heilig 16758 ably securing said containers in side by side relationship 5 includes a flexible band frictionally detachably embrac- FOREIGN PATENTS ing said first and second containers. 4605 45 10/ 1949 Canada- 1,099,180 3/1955 France. References Cited by the Examiner OTHER REFERENCES UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 Pharmaceutical Formulas, 12th Edition The Chemist 704,105 7/1902 Read 222 145 and Druggist, London (1953, pp. 266, 268 and 297). 975,354 11/1910 Gru ter et a1 16758 997 0 0 7 1911 d i 22 142 RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

Maignen Exannner 1,568,160 1/1926 Hi'bbert 222 142.3 X 15

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US704105 *Nov 29, 1901Jul 8, 1902Ellis D ReadBottle or flask.
US975354 *Jul 14, 1910Nov 8, 1910Chemische Werke Vorm Dr Heinrich BykStable mixture of producing hydrogen peroxid.
US997060 *Apr 5, 1911Jul 4, 1911Herman HedrichSalt and pepper shaker.
US1086339 *Jul 11, 1913Feb 3, 1914Prosper Jean Auguste MaignenAntiseptic.
US1568160 *Jul 21, 1924Jan 5, 1926William HibbertCombined salt and pepper shaker
US2661870 *Sep 28, 1948Dec 8, 1953Huenergardt Alfred GMultiple liquid dispensing container
US2876935 *Jun 6, 1958Mar 10, 1959David P LindbergCriminal apprehension aid
US2941696 *Aug 19, 1957Jun 21, 1960Ortho Pharma CorpDispensing container
US3079299 *Nov 16, 1959Feb 26, 1963Gen Aerosol CorpSelf-propelling medicinal ointment composition containing polyethylene and method ofapplication
CA460545A *Oct 25, 1949John Le Roy RemcoPlastic sectional plate
FR1099180A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3335912 *Nov 2, 1966Aug 15, 1967Colgate Palmolive CoCollapsible compartmented dispensing container
US3709437 *Sep 14, 1970Jan 9, 1973Hershel Earl WrightMethod and device for producing foam
US3760986 *Aug 19, 1970Sep 25, 1973Schuyler Dev CorpDispensing bottles with pump means for simultaneous dispensing
US4125207 *Feb 28, 1977Nov 14, 1978Frederick T. ErnstChain saw servicing kit
US4240566 *Sep 17, 1979Dec 23, 1980Whirlco, Inc.Captive mixing cap arrangement for multiple chamber container
US4260077 *Oct 4, 1979Apr 7, 1981Aelco CorporationDual separable dispenser
US4564129 *Jan 27, 1983Jan 14, 1986Hoechst-Roussel Pharmaceuticals Inc.Dosage dispensing unit
US4678103 *Mar 27, 1986Jul 7, 1987The Procter & Gamble CompanyPlural-chambered dispensing device exhibiting constant proportional co-dispensing and method for making same
US4730381 *Feb 20, 1987Mar 15, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making plural-chambered dispensing device exhibiting constant proportional co-dispensing
US4765510 *Apr 7, 1987Aug 23, 1988Rende Vincent NMultiple color fluid dispensing gun
US4902281 *Aug 16, 1988Feb 20, 1990Corus Medical CorporationFibrinogen dispensing kit
US4919293 *Jun 2, 1989Apr 24, 1990Paul BuckleyMulti-unit dispensing container assembly
US4971211 *Oct 16, 1989Nov 20, 1990Lake Marie IDual chambered baby bottle
US5076464 *Sep 4, 1990Dec 31, 1991Patrick SimonDeformable tubular container
US5078129 *Mar 8, 1990Jan 7, 1992Research Foundation Of State University Of New YorkDevice for stimulating salivation
US5135116 *Apr 2, 1991Aug 4, 1992Franco PanzettiPackage containers for liquid products
US5152461 *Oct 1, 1990Oct 6, 1992Proctor Rudy RHand operated sprayer with multiple fluid containers
US5158191 *Mar 1, 1991Oct 27, 1992Plastic Processing CorporationDual bottle container having a dual outlet cap
US5316159 *Jul 20, 1992May 31, 1994Plastic Processing CorporationDual bottle container
US5339988 *Oct 19, 1992Aug 23, 1994Ballard Medical ProductsDisposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods
US5368563 *Nov 8, 1993Nov 29, 1994Micromedics, Inc.Sprayer assembly for physiologic glue
US5372281 *Oct 12, 1993Dec 13, 1994Ballard Medical ProductsDisposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods
US5402916 *Jun 22, 1993Apr 4, 1995Nottingham Spirk Design AssociatesDual chamber sprayer with metering assembly
US5452823 *Aug 24, 1994Sep 26, 1995Ballard Medical ProductsDisposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods
US5607072 *Nov 15, 1994Mar 4, 1997Gilbeys Of Ireland (Manufacturing) LimitedBeverage containers
US5656035 *Apr 25, 1995Aug 12, 1997Avoy; Donald R.Refillable fibrinogen dispensing kit
US5664557 *Dec 27, 1995Sep 9, 1997Respiratory Delivery Systems, Inc.Releasably engageable coupling for an inhaler
US5740947 *May 13, 1996Apr 21, 1998Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Dual compartment pump dispenser
US5759171 *Sep 27, 1996Jun 2, 1998Thermogenesis Corp.Sprayer for fibrin glue
US5765725 *May 28, 1996Jun 16, 1998Matt; WilliamDual compartment squeezable dispensing container and cap
US5857591 *Aug 11, 1997Jan 12, 1999Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Simultaneous pump dispenser
US5881918 *Mar 13, 1997Mar 16, 1999Eichler; Barbara J.Multi-liquid dispenser
US5906198 *Jul 14, 1997May 25, 1999Flickinger; William J.Nasal nebulizer
US5975367 *Sep 27, 1996Nov 2, 1999Thermogenesis Corp.Fibrin glue line and dot dispenser
US6223942Jul 28, 1998May 1, 2001Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Container and closure
US6274090Aug 5, 1998Aug 14, 2001Thermogenesis Corp.Apparatus and method of preparation of stable, long term thrombin from plasma and thrombin formed thereby
US6419783Apr 16, 1999Jul 16, 2002Unilever Home & Personal Care UsaContainer and closure
US6472162Jun 4, 1999Oct 29, 2002Thermogenesis Corp.Method for preparing thrombin for use in a biological glue
US6729334 *Mar 10, 1999May 4, 2004Trudell Medical LimitedNebulizing catheter system and methods of use and manufacture
US6732887Mar 26, 2002May 11, 2004Ultradent Products, Inc.Two-part composition syringe delivery system
US6783514 *Jan 31, 1997Aug 31, 2004United States Surgical CorporationFibrin sealant applicator
US6857530 *Dec 10, 2002Feb 22, 2005Graham Packaging Company, L.P.Package of interengaging containers for companion products
US7056722Nov 10, 2000Jun 6, 2006Thermogenesis Corp.Apparatus and method of preparation of stable, long term thrombin from plasma and thrombin formed thereby
US7407117Apr 27, 2005Aug 5, 2008Meadwestvaco Calmar, Inc.Liquid sprayer assembly
US7413652Apr 26, 2005Aug 19, 2008Arteriocyte Medical Systems, Inc.Method for the production of a blood component composition
US7448556 *Feb 16, 2005Nov 11, 2008Henkel KgaaDispenser bottle for at least two active fluids
US7469700Jun 25, 2003Dec 30, 2008Trudell Medical LimitedNebulizing catheter system for delivering an aerosol to a patient
US7472705Jun 25, 2003Jan 6, 2009Trudell Medical LimitedMethods of forming a nebulizing catheter
US7594594Nov 17, 2004Sep 29, 2009International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.Multi-compartment storage and delivery containers and delivery system for microencapsulated fragrances
US7775401Jun 25, 2007Aug 17, 2010S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Fluid delivery system for dispensing primary and secondary fluids
US7914517Nov 1, 2004Mar 29, 2011Trudell Medical InternationalSystem and method for manipulating a catheter for delivering a substance to a body cavity
US7997449May 3, 2010Aug 16, 2011S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Fluid delivery system for dispensing primary and secondary fluids
US8161968Jul 21, 2004Apr 24, 2012Glaxo Group LimitedMedicament dispenser
US8201556Aug 12, 2005Jun 19, 2012Glaxo Group LimitedMedicament dispenser
US8511304Jan 22, 2003Aug 20, 2013Glaxo Group LimitedMedicament dispenser
US8550303Nov 4, 2009Oct 8, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyMulti-chambered container
US8567620 *Oct 13, 2010Oct 29, 2013Sulzer Mixpac AgContainer having a shock-absorbing element
US8746242Jul 27, 2006Jun 10, 2014Glaxo Group LimitedMedicament dispenser
US8776788Nov 13, 2007Jul 15, 2014Glaxo Group LimitedSheet driver for use in a drug dispenser
US8870027 *Mar 15, 2012Oct 28, 2014David G. KraenzleMulti-bottle containers for dispensing measured quantities of liquids
US20110094989 *Oct 13, 2010Apr 28, 2011Josef EttlinContainer having a shock-absorbing element
US20130240563 *Mar 15, 2012Sep 19, 2013David G. KraenzleMulti-Bottle Containers for Dispensing Measured Quantities of Liquids
US20140299629 *Jun 1, 2012Oct 9, 2014Bader Abdullah Al KallotiCondiment dispener
EP0649682A2 *Sep 19, 1991Apr 26, 1995Take 5Multiple fluid containers for hand operated sprayer
EP0807471A2 *May 2, 1997Nov 19, 1997Unilever PlcDual compartment pump dispenser
EP1355105A2 *Apr 11, 2003Oct 22, 2003Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.Pressure vessel
WO1992021404A1 *May 27, 1992Dec 10, 1992Novo Nordisk AsNasal dispenser actuated by nose contact
WO1995000436A1 *Jun 21, 1994Jan 5, 1995Nottingham Spirk Design AssDual chamber sprayer with metering assembly
WO2000006456A2Jul 26, 1999Feb 10, 2000Lever Hindustan LtdContainer and closure
WO2003072446A1 *Feb 26, 2003Sep 4, 2003Graham Packaging CoPackage of interengaging containers for companion products
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/200.14, 239/327, D09/447, 222/135, 239/304, D24/110, 215/6, 604/191
International ClassificationB05B11/00, A61M11/02, B05B11/04, A61M11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B11/0078, B05B11/048, A61M11/00, A61M11/02
European ClassificationB05B11/04F, A61M11/02, A61M11/00, B05B11/00B11