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Publication numberUS3269731 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1966
Filing dateAug 2, 1963
Priority dateAug 2, 1963
Publication numberUS 3269731 A, US 3269731A, US-A-3269731, US3269731 A, US3269731A
InventorsAlbert Schlapa, Koci Jerry C
Original AssigneeChicago Dynamic Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bowling game with sequentially illuminated bulbs simulating bowler and ball movements
US 3269731 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 60, 1966 J. c. Kocl ET AL 3,26 31 BOWLING GAME WITH SEQUENTIALLY ILLUMINATED BULBS SIMULAT N BOWLER AND BALL MOVEMENTS Filed Aug. 2, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INV T0125: RRY 8.1m AND BERT S 0141 1425.

Aug. 30, 366 J. c. KOCI ETAL 3,269,731

BOWLING GAME WITH SEQUENTIALLY ILLUMINATED BULBS SIMULATING BOWLER AND BALL MOVEMENTS Filed Aug. 2, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IKIVENTORS Aug. 30, 19% J. c. Kocl ETAL 3,26,731

BOWLING GAME WITH SEQUENTIALLY ILLUMINA'IED BULBS SIMULATING BOWLER AND BALL MOVEMENTS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 2, 1965 Aug. 30, 1966 J. c. KOCI ET AL 3,269,731

BOWLING GAME WITH SEQUENTIALLY ILLUMINATED BULBS SIMULATING BOWLER AND BALL MOVEMENTS Filed Aug. 2, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Mew THE/ AZ'IWJP/V K United States Patent 3,269,731 BOWLING GAME WITH SEQUENTIALLY ILLUMI- NATED BULBS SIMULATING BOWLER AND BALL MGVEMENTS Jerry C. Koei, Barrington, and Albert Schlapa, Hinsdale,

Ill, assignors to Qhicago Dynamic Industries, Inc, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Aug. 2, 1963, Ser. No. 299,628 Claims. (Cl. 273-85) Our invention relates to new and useful improvements in simulated bowling games in which a plurality of successively energized lights is employed to produce a silhouette to simulate a bowler throwing a ball toward a target consisting of movable simulated bowling pins and to simulate the return of the ball down a return trough.

An object of such invention is to provide in such a game, lights successively energized to produce silhouettes first to simulate a player in the action of picking up a ball, throwing the ball toward the target, and then simulating the ball rolling down a return trough to a position where the ball appears as being again picked up by the simulated player.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an arrangement whereby the player may change the path along which the silhouetted ball is to travel toward its target of simulated bowling pins.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

The invention consists in the novel combination and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter described and claimed.

The invention will be best understood by reference to the accompanying drawings showing the preferred form of construction, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of our invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional plan view of the game apparatus illustrated in FIG. 1, as viewed beneath the translucent plate thereof;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional detail view taken substantially on line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional detail view taken substantially on line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional perspective view of the simulated bowling pin support;

FIG. 6 illustrates suggested schematic circuits embodied in our invention;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional detail view taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 1.

The several objects of the invention are accomplished by the preferred form of construction shown in the accompanying drawings. In this connection, a cabinet is indicated at 10 (FIG. 1). This cabinet includes side and end walls 11 and 12, respectively. At one end of the cabinet is a score box 13 within which are arranged score units and elements of well-known construction. Such elements and units are not described herein, as they do not constitute any part of the present invention. The cabinet 10 has a transparent cover 14. Beneath this cover 14 is a translucent panel 15 of substantially the same area as the cover 14 and spaced a predetermined distance therefrom. On the translucent panel 15 is screened or painted a simulated return trough 16.

The front or players end of the cabinet 10 is provided with a panel 17 on which are mounted in spaced relation with respect to each other, directional push buttons 18 and 19. Also mounted on the panel 17 is a shot push button 20.

Beneath the translucent panel 15 is a mounting plate 21 spaced a predetermined distance beneath the plate 15 and of the same general area and in parallel relation with respect thereto.

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Mounted on a plate 21' is a braket 22. This bracket '22 by means of blocks 23 is supported in spaced relation above the mounting plate 21. Extending longitudinally with respect to the mounting plate 21 is a bar 23. The bar 23 is substantially channel-shaped in cross section (FIG. 3) and includes a filler block 24 preferably of wood or other light material. In the bar 23 there are formed in equal spaced relation with respect to each other, openings 25. Beneath each of these openings is an electric bulb 26 supported by a suitable socket 27 mounted on a bracket 28. Inwardly of the end portion 29 (FIG. 2) of the bar 23, the bar 23 is pivoted as to 30 to the bracket 22. The end portion 31 of the bar 23 extends from a relatively fiat wide plate 32 to which it is fixed by securing the same thereto. This plate 32 is provided with an opening 33 and openings 34 in alignment with respect to each other. Beneath the opening 33 and other openings 34 are electric bulbs 35 and 35' respectively which are mounted in the sockets 36 similar to the sockets 27. The sockets 36, like the sockets 27, are supported by brackets 37 from the bar 23.

Formed in the plate 32 in longitudinal alignment with respect to each other are cut-out portions generally indicated at 38 in a form to outline simulated bowlers in running alignment with respect to each other. As seen in FIG. 2, three of the cut-out simulated bowlers, indicated at 40, each have an arm extending into the opening 34 and progressively from the bot-tom of the plate 32 the arm and legs of the simulated bowler are in different positions so as to simulate running action of the bowler.

Beneath the cut-out portions 38 are electric bulbs 38' which when successively energized produce the silhouetted simulated bowler in running action upon the plate 15.

The end portion 31 of the bar 23 as shown in FIG. 2, is supported on a carriage 41. The carriage 41 is supported by a pair of wheels 42 and a wheel 43 for movement transversely of a plate 41 spaced -fromthe mounting plate 21 by blocks 42 (FIG. 2). The wheels 42 ride on the top surface of the plate 41', whereas the wheel 43 engages the under surface thereof. The wheel 43 is carried by an arm 44 having a pair of slots 45 through which attachment screws 46 project, the screws 46 being threaded into the carriage plate 41. This form of slot and screw connection permits the arm 44 to be adjusted relative to the carriage plate 41 so as to properly position the wheel 43 in balanced relation with respect to the wheels 42.

As is apparent, the bar 23 is permitted to oscillate in a horizontal plane about its pintle 30. This oscillation is accomplished by means of a reversible motor 48 having a shaft 49 to which is connected a link 50 (FIG. 2). The link 50 is connected to an arm 51 which in turn has its end portion pivotally connected as at 52 to the bar 23.

Extending longitudinally of the mounting plate 21 and supported by the plates 21 and 41 is an elongated bar 53 having a horizontal flange 54 provided with a plurality of equally spaced openings 55. The bar is cut-out as at 53 to permit passage of the carriage 41. The end portion 56 of the horizontal flange 54 is provided with adjacent spaced apart openings 57 and 57. Beneath the openings and the opening 57 are arranged electric bulbs 26' similar to the electric bulbs 26 and mounted in sockets similar to the sockets 27. A similar electric bulb 28' is arranged beneath the opening 57 and is connected in series with a limiting switch 74 hereinafter mentioned. The electric bulbs 26' and the bulb 28' are disposed beneath the simulated trough 16 (FIG. 1) so that when such bulbs are successively illuminated, there will be a simulation of the silhouetted ball rolling down the return trough 16. I

Within the score box 13' is a mounting structure 58 having mounted thereon as shown in FIG. 5, a plurality of electromagnetic coils 59. Each of these coils includes a solenoid or plunger 60. Each plunger carries a simulated bowling pin 61. When the coils 59 are energized, the solenoids 60 will be drawn within the coils 59 to lift the simulated bowling pins 61 to a position within the box 13 where they are concealed from view.

It is intended that the units included in the box be such as will illuminate upon the face 13 of the box, bowling pins 61 which correspond to the number of pins which have been drawn within the box 13 by the coils 59. As before stated, the mechanism for energizing the coils 59 may be of any approved construction and circuitry.

In FIG. 6, we have schematically illustrated two circuits A and B, respectively. The circuit A controls the reversible motor 48. By the independent operation of the directional control switches 18' and 19-for example, when the directional control switch 18 is closed the motor will rotate in one direction, that is, in a clockwise direction, and will pivot the bar 23 to the left as viewed in FIG. 2. When the directional control switch 19 is closed, the directional control switch 18' being open, the motor 48 will rotate in an opposite, or counterclockwise, direction with the result that the bar 23 will pivot to the right as viewed in FIG. 2.

The end 31 of the bar 23 carries a wiper finger 62 which is adapted to have wiping contact successively with contact 63 carried by the plate 41 and arranged in alignment with respect to each other. These pins 63 are connected together as shown in circuit B. To these pins 63 corresponding sides 64 of the electric bulbs 26, 26 and 35 are connected. The wiper finger 62 is connected to a ground 65. The opposite side of each of such electric bulbs 26, 26' and 35 is connected to a group of contacts 66, as seen in circuit B (FIG. 6). Three of the bulbs 38 are connected in series with adjacent bulbs 35. These contacts 66 are included as a part of a step-up switch 67 having a wiper finger 68 which has successive wiping contact with the contacts 66. The reason for connecting each of the opposite sides of the electric bulbs with a group of contacts 66 is to extend the duration of illumination of the bulb. We have found that if a single contact is employed .for each of the opposite sides of the electric bulbs, the bulb will have too short a period of illumination and thus destroy the illusion intended, namely, that of the bowling action of the simulated bowler as well as movement of the simulated ball.

The wiper finger 68 is connected to one side of a power source 69, the other side of the power source being grounded as at 70 (see circuit B, FIGURE 6). Through the medium of a shaft 71 of a motor 72, the wiper finger 68 is caused to rotate in wiping contact with respect to the contacts 66. This motor is connected in circuit with a switch 76 actuated by a holding relay 73, and in the circuit of the motor 72 is a conventional limiting switch 74 which permits the motor 72 to operate through one complete cycle. In this instance, the limiting switch 74 is actuated by a cam 75 (FIG. 2) actuated by the motor 72.

The coil 73 is energized by a shot switch actuated by the shot button 20. When the shot switch 20' is closed, the coil 73 will be energized to close the switch 76 to hold the circuit for the motor 72 until the limiting switch 74 is opened by the cam 75, whereupon the coil 73 will be dc-energized and the switch 76 opened. The motor will have s-ufiicient inertia after the opening of the switch 76 to rotate the shaft thereof to a position where the switch 74 will be closed and in position to permit a new cycle of rotation upon the energization of the coil 73 and closing of the switch 76.

Each of the directional control buttons 18 and 19 as well as the shot button 20 may be of similar construction, varying in size. In this connection, I have shown in FIG. 7, a suggested construction which includes a bezel 77 having an opening 78 through which projects the head 79 of the push button disc 80. The disc carries a plunger 81 which normally rests upon an upper leaf 82 of the shot switch 18. When the button 79 is pressed against the action of a spring 83, the plunger 81 will move the spring leaf 82 into contact with the spring leaf 84, thus closing the switch 18' (or 19 or 20, as the case may be).

When the game is not in operation, the light-bearing bar 23 is in the full line position shown in FIG. 2. The wiper finger 68 (FIG. 6) is in contact with the contact 66 of the step-in switch 67. The wiper finger 62 is out of engagement with the contacts 63 (FIG. 6). The control switches 18' and 19 are in open position, as are the switches 20' and 76. The switch 74' is in closed position to establish a circuit for the bulb 28' which is now energized, to simulate a ball in the return trough.

To operate the game, the operator closes either of the directional control switches 13' or 19' by pressing the button 18 or 19. Assuming that the directional control switch 18 is closed: the closing of such switch will establish a circuit to the motor 48 which will remain energized as long as the directional control switch 18' is closed.

As the motor 48 begins its cycle of rotation, the cam 75' will open the switch 74', deenergizing the bulb 28. Simultaneously with this starting operation of the motor 48, the bar 23 will pivot, bringing the wiper finger 62 into contact with the contacts 63 to establish a circuit energizing the electric bulb 35 adjacent the electric bulb 28 (FIG. 2), thus to simulate the picking up of the bowling ball from the end of the return trough to the hand of the simulated silhouetted bowler at the lower end portion of the plate 32. The operator will maintain the control switch 18 in closed position until he has positioned the simulated bowling ball produced by the illumination of the lowermost light bulb 35' in a desired position with respect to the target (the simulated bowling pins 61). When the operator has accomplished this positioning of the simulated bowling ball, he then closes the shot switch 20 by pressing the shot button 20. The closing of the switch 20 energizes the holding relay 73 which in turn closes the switch 76, establishing a holding circuit for the motor 72. Upon rotation of this motor 72, the wiper finger 68 will be rotated into wiping engagement with respect to the contacts 66 to successively illuminate the remaining of the electric bulbs 35' and the bulbs 38' in series therewith, and to thereafter successively energize the electric bulbs 26, thus to simulate the rolling of a bowling ball toward the target. At the end or terminal of such rolling of the simulated ball and continued operation of the wiper finger 68, the electric bulbs 26 will be successively energized to simulate the return of the ball down the return trough to its original starting position. This is completed by the reclosing of the switch 74', which energizes the electric bulb 28' to produce a silhouetted bowling ball at the end of the return trough.

At the completion of a cycle of rotation of the wiper finger 68, the cam 75 operated by the motor 72 will open the switch 74 to deenergize the motor 72. There remains a sufiicient inertia of the motor to rotate so as to position the wiper finger 68 in contact with the contact 66, preparing an electric circuit to the first of the electric bulbs 35 upon movement of the wiper 62 into contact with the contacts 63.

If it be desired, a well-known type of coin control mechanism may be incorporated in the circuits shown in FIG. 6, whereby the game can be played only upon deposit of a coin of predetermined denomination.

From the foregoing description, we have provided a simulated bowling game which will afford the maximum amusement to the player and one in which the operation is relatively simple and understandable, as Well as attractive, to the player.

While we have illustrated and described the preferred form of construction for carrying our invention into effect, this is capable of variation and modification without departing from the spirit of the invention. We therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise details of constructon set forth, but desire to avail ourselves of such variations and modifications as come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. An amusement bowling game apparatus comprising (a) a cabinet having arranged therein in a horizontal plane a translucent panel on the surface of which is a representation of a simulated ball return trough,

(b) an elongated stationary member within said cabinet beneath and in parallel relation with respect to said simulated trough and having a plurality of openings formed therein in spaced relation with respect to each other,

(c) electric bulbs beneath the openings of said stationary member,

(d) a movable elongated member arranged in said cabinet beneath said panel and having a plurality of equally spaced openings therein and having at one end thereof spaced cut-out portions defining figures of a bowler in various bowling positions to progressively depict running and throwing of a ball, the arm of certain of the figures extending into certain of the openings adjacent thereto,

(e) means for mounting said movable member in said cabinet for oscillatory movement in a horizontal plane,

(f) electric bulbs supported by said movable member beneath said openings thereof and beneath said cutout portions and when energized presenting successive silhouettes of said bowler and said openings of said movable member upon the translucent panel,

(g) means for oscillating said movable member,

(h) means for successively energizing said electric bulbs in both of said elongated members to produce on said panel said silhouettes in progressive movement,

(i) means controlled by said oscillating means for holding energized the electric bulb beneath and at the end of said simulated trough, and

(j) means actuated by said means for successively energizing said electric bulbs for energizing the first of said electric bulbs on said movable member when said last-mentioned electric bulb is deenergized by said oscillating means whereby to simulate the picking up of the simulated ball from the end of the trough by the simulated bowler defined by the first cut-out portion of said movable member.

2. The apparatus defined by claim 1 further characterized by the inclusion of (k) means under the control of the player of the game apparatus for operating said oscillating means.

3. An amusement bowling game apparatus comprising (a) a cabinet having arranged therein in a horizontal plane a translucent panel on the surface of which is a representation of a simulated ball return trough,

(b) an elongated stationary member within said cabinet beneath and in parallel relation with respect to said simulated trough and having a plurality of openings formed therein in spaced relation with respect to each other,

(c) electric bulbs beneath the openings of said stationary member,

(d) a movable elongated member arranged in said cabinet beneath said panel and having a plurality of equally spaced openings therein and having at one end thereof spaced cut-out portions defining figures of a bowler in various bowling positions to progressively depict running and throwing of a ball, the arm of certain of the figures extending into certain of the openings adjacent thereto,

(e) means for mounting said movable member in said cabinet for oscillatory movement in a horizontal plane,

(f) electric bulbs supported by said movable member beneath said openings thereof and beneath said cutout portions and when energized presenting successive silhouettes of said bowler and said openings of said movable member upon the translucent panel,

(g) means for oscillating said movable member,

(h) means for successively energizing said electric bulbs in both of said elongated members to produce on said panel said silhouettes in progressive movement,

(i) means under the control of the player of the apparatus for initiating the operation of the means for successively energizing the electric bulbs,

(j) means controlled by said oscillating means for holding energized the electric bulb beneath and at the end of said simulated trough, and

(k) means actuated by said means for successively energizing said electric bulbs for energizing the first of said electric bulbs of said movable member when said last-mentioned electric bulb is deenergized by said oscillating means whereby to simulate the picking up of the simulated ball from the end of the trough by the simulated bowler defined by the first cut-out portion of said movable member.

4. The apparatus defined by claim 3 further characterized by the inclusion of (l) a holding circuit for said means for successively energizing said electric bulbs after the initial operation of said latter means by the player.

5. An amusement bowling game apparatus comprising (a) a cabinet having arranged therein in a horizontal plane a translucent panel on the surface of which is a representation of a simulated ball return trough,

(b) an elongated stationary member within said cabinet beneath and in parallel relation with respect to said simulated trough and having a plurality of openings formed therein in spaced relation with respect to each other,

(c) electric bulbs beneath the openings of said stationary member,

(d) a movable elongated member arranged in said cabinet beneath said panel and having a plurality of equally spaced openings therein and having at one end thereof spaced cut-out portions defining figures of a bowler in various bowling positions to progressively depict running and throwing of a ball, the arm of certain of the figures extending into certain of the openings adjacent thereto,

(e) means for mounting said movable member in said cabinet for oscillatory movement in a horizontal plane,

(f) electric bulbs supported by said movable member beneath said openings thereof and beneath said cutout portions and when energized presenting successive silhouettes of said bowler and said openings of said movable member upon the translucent panel,

(g) electric motor means for oscillating said movable member,

(h) and means under the control of the player of the apparatus for controlling the operation of said motor means to oscillate said movable member at a selected position on either side of its mounting and beneath Said panel,

(i) means for successively energizing said electric bulbs in both of said elongated members to produce on said panel said silhouettes in progressive movement,

(j) means controlled by said electric motor means for holding energized the electric bulb beneath and at the end of said simulated trough, and

(k) means actuated by said means for successively energizing said electric bulbs for energizing the first of said electric bulbs on said movable member when said last-mentioned electric bulb is deenergized by '7 8 said oscillating means whereby to simulate the pick- 2,531,608 11/1950 Bula 273-1011 ing up of the simulated ball from the end of the 2, 09,203 9 1952 Bula 273 5 trough by the simulated bowler defined by the first 2 925 275 2/1960 schlapa 273 85 X cut-out portion of said movable member.

References Cited by the Examiner 5 DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENTS ANTON 0. OECHSLE, Examiner.

2,300,132 10/1942 New 273-1012

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2300132 *Sep 21, 1940Oct 27, 1942New Fred MTorpedo shooting game apparatus
US2531608 *Aug 31, 1946Nov 28, 1950Bula Frank JBombing game
US2609203 *Dec 1, 1948Sep 2, 1952Theodore KruseSimulated bowling game
US2925275 *Aug 4, 1958Feb 16, 1960Chicago Dynamic Ind IncSimulated baseball game
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3337218 *Sep 8, 1964Aug 22, 1967Elliott & Evans IncAmusement apparatus
US3637212 *Mar 24, 1969Jan 25, 1972Funtronics IncBird shoot game and the like
US4008893 *Feb 26, 1975Feb 22, 1977Mark YoseloffSimulated bowling game
US4369971 *Jan 7, 1981Jan 25, 1983Mattel, Inc.Electronic bowling game
US5059125 *Aug 14, 1989Oct 22, 1991Better Bowling, Inc.Bowling tutor
US7128644 *Oct 18, 2002Oct 31, 2006Stephen LinzeyCoin roll type coin operated redemption game where rolling coin turns into image on video screen
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/52, 40/442
International ClassificationA63D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63D3/00
European ClassificationA63D3/00