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Publication numberUS3270404 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1966
Filing dateAug 6, 1963
Priority dateAug 6, 1963
Publication numberUS 3270404 A, US 3270404A, US-A-3270404, US3270404 A, US3270404A
InventorsAndreassen Alfred E O
Original AssigneeChamberlain Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making metallic shelving
US 3270404 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 6, 1966 A. E. o. ANDREASSEN 3,

METHOD OF MAKING METALLIC SHELVING Filed Aug. 6, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. Acreafd Mme/1 Sept. 6, 1966 A. E. o. ANDREASSEN 3,270,404

METHOD OF MAKING METALLIC SHELVING Filed Aug. 6, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 23 7 i 2 a Z INVENTOR.

A TT( )R NE YS Sept. 6, 1966 A. E. o. ANDREASSEN 3, 7

METHOD OF MAKING METALLIC SHELVING 4 Sheets-$heet 5 Filed Aug. 6, 1963 Sept. 6, 1966 A. E. o. ANDREASSEN 3,270,404

METHOD OF MAKING METALLIC SHELVING 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 6, 1963 INVENTOR.

/ A TTORA EYS United States Patent 3,270,404 METHOD OF MAKING METALLIC SHELVING Alfred E. 0. Andre'assen, Waterloo, Iowa, assignor to Chamberlain Corporation, Waterloo, Iowa, a corporation of Iowa Filed Aug. 6, 1963, Ser. No. 300,271 8 Claims. (Cl. 29-460) This invention relates to improvements in a method of making metallic shelving, and more particularly to making of metallic shelving of the type highly desirable for use in refrigerators, stoves, various types of commercial cabinets, and in other and various locations as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

Shelves of this general type are usually made with front and rear cross bars for the smaller shelves, and with front, center and rear cross bars for the larger shelves, with spaced wires or rods extending from the front to the rear cross bars and secured to the cross bars. Different types of side members to which the ends of the cross bars are secured are also used and the structure of the particular side members depends upon the character of the shelf itself, that is whether it is mounted in cantilever fashion, in a glideout shelf, a swing-out shelf, or some other form.

While different methods have been developed for the making of shelving of this type, the common expedient in the past has been to thread the ends of the wires or rods through apertures in the front and rear cross bars or frame members and rivet or peen the rods to the bars. The wires would enter into notches in the center cross bar and the bar or the wire staked adjacent the notch to hold the same connected. Riveting the ends of the wires to the front and rear rails or cross bars of the shelf structures required heading the wires and it Was an expensive and costly operation. Staking the wires to the center of the cross bar rendered the shelf somewhat unsightly due to the nicked appearance and the staking did not hold the wires with desirable strength and security, since sometimes the wires actually became loosened. Difiiculty was also experienced in the past in acquiring a trim member which extends across the front of the shelf and usually functions as a handle, of different color than the shelf itself. A further disadvantage of the manufacture of such shelving as heretofore known resided in the fact that the cross bars, in order to afford a sufficiently strong shelf structure, were made of stock that was purchased in straight lengths from which the desired unit lengths were severed, and the bars were too great in cross section to be severed from a roll of stock and successfully straightened in accordance with economic production.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a method of making metallic shelving, which results in a better shelf structure produced far more economically than was heretofore possible.

Another important object of this invention is the provision of a method of making metallic shelving which results in increased production rates and lends itself to automation.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a method of making metallic shelving in which lighter cross bar or frame members may be utilized, and which are sufficiently small in size to permit severance of the desired length from a stock roll.

Another feature of the instant invention resides in the provision of a method of making shelves, wherein riveting of the ends of the wires is entirely eliminated.

Another desideratum of the invention is the provision of a method of making shelves which results in stronger and more positive anchorage of the wires with a greater bed for the wires to seat upon.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a method of making shelving which results in a shelf to which a preformed trim member may be readily snapped or telescoped, whereby it is economical and simple to provide a trim member different in color than the shelf.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a method of making shelving which results in the automatic strengthening of the smaller cross bars used and at the same time providing a shelf more pleasing in appearance in that the disrupted appearance of staking to hold the wires is eliminated.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosure, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic view indicating the succession of steps followed in the practice of a method embodying principles of the instant invention;

FIGURE 2. is an enlarged fragmentary plan view indicating the cutting of the shelf cross bars;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary plan view of the lower cross bar notching die;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line IV-IV of FIGURE 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating the notching of the cross bar, with the upper notching die in association with the lower;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary plan view illustrating the placing of the wires in the cross bar;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating the swaging of the cross bars to strengthen the same and lock the wires in position;

FIGURE 8 is a greatly enlarged vertical sectional view illustrating the notching and saddle forming operation, taken substantially as indicated by the line VII-- .VII of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 9 is a view similar in character to FIGURE 5 showing the operation between the swaging die and the lower notching die, taken substantially as indicated by the line IX--IX of FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating the swaging of the front cross bar and the die used therefor;

FIGURE 11 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the swaging die for the front cross bar;

FIGURE 12 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line XII-XII of FIGURE 10;

FIGURE 13 is a perspective view of a completed shelf;

FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line XIV-XIV of FIG- URE 13 showing the connection between the trim member and the front cross bar;

FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line XVXV of FIGURE 14; and

FIGURE 16 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line XVI-XVI of FIG- URE 13.

As shown on the drawings:

By way of example and not by way of limitation, the instant invention will be herein described as employed in the making of a refrigerator or commercial cabinet shelf of the cantilever variety, although it will be understood that by merely changing the side members of the shelf, the shelf may be altered to be a vertically pivotal shelf, a swing-out shelf, a glideout shelf, and so on. The shelf is made of metal, and for refrigerators and similar locations aluminum is preferably used because of its lightness and the ease with which it may be shaped, al-

though other metals may also be used such as steel for shelves utilized in ovens and the like.

Briefly in the performance of the instant invention, the cross bars are severed from a coil of stock in the desired lengths for the particular shelving being then manufactured, straightened in any suitable manner, and placed on edge in a lower die. By vertical pressure notches are formed in the cross bar with a notching die, and a lateral thickening or saddle occurs at the base of each notch to seat the wires. The wires are then placed in position in the cross bars, and by suitable top dies, the space between the notches is flattened at the top to provide a strengthening substantially T-shaped cross section to the cross bars between the Wires. This formation overlaps the wires to a material extent and securely bonds the wires to the cross bars. The top die utilized for the front cross bar has spaced voids therein which results in providing upstanding lugs on the front cross bar at spaced intervals, both inner and outer lugs being provided, and the front trim may be snapped into position on the bar being held at the top by those lugs, or it may be telescoped along the cross bar into proper position.

As diagrammatically indicated in FIGURE 1, the making of shelving by the instant method is a continuous procedure. While the drawings illustrate the shaping and attachment of wires to one cross bar at a time, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the die means may be made to accommodate two or three cross bars as the case may be and there may be an equal number of coils of bar stock so that a complete shelf except for trim and side members may be completed in one substantially continuous succession of operations.

Bar stock is continuously fed from a coil 1 to station A where suitable parting dies, not shown, successively severs the strip into cross bars 2 of the desired length for the particular shelf. These cross bars are then moved to station E where they are placed on edge in a base or notching die and provided with notches with saddle formations at the bottoms thereof. The base or notching die in which the members remain is then moved to station C where wires or rods 3 are placed in the notches of the cross bars, and the base die is then moved to station D carrying the wires. At station D by suitable die mechanisms and under direct downward compression, the cross bars are shaped at their upper margins in a manner to both strengthen them and securely lock the wires to the cross bars, the front cross bar being further provided with lugs to hold a preformed trim member in place at the front of the shelf.

Assuming, for example, the making of a refrigerator shelf, the material from the stock coil 1 is preferably aluminum in the form of a band or a ribbon. The aluminum is thinner and lighter than that previously used for shelving of equal strength and capacity. At station A, a portion of the stock is straightened in any suitable manner, such as by rolls or by means carried by the parting dies, and the material is severed into desired lengths or cross bars 2 by the parting dies in a manner to provide an extending tongue 4 on each end of each bar 2. The feed from the roll of stock can be practically continuous, except for the slight stop at the time the cut is made. For example, the bar material for shelving of the type used in average household refrigerators could satisfactorily be inch in thickness and inch in width.

At station B a bar 2 is associated with each of two or more base or notching dies, so that the complete center portion of a shelf may be constructed at one time, although only one such base die is shown and will be described for purposes of convenience. As seen best in FIGURES 3 and 4, a base die 5 comprises a suitable block of metal 6 having spaced transversely extending grooves 7 therein, each of the size to accommodate a wire or rod 3. The die block 6 is also provided with a relatively wide centrally disposed longitudinal deep groove or slot 8, FIGURE 4, and disposed on opposite sides of this slot 8 are identical confronting hardened steel members 9 and 10 each of which is of less height than the die block 6 to provide opposed shoulders at 11 and 12 respectively, defined by the upper edge of the hardened member and the adjacent wall of the die block extending thereabove. Each of the members 9 and 10 is provided with spaced notches 13 therein in registry with the transverse grooves 7 in the die block. At the base of the notches 7 and 13 lateral concavities 14 are formed in the members 9 and 10 and the die block. Between the members 9 and 10 a groove 15 remains which is of just the size to receive a cross bar 2 standing on edge. As seen best in FIGURE 3 the cross bar 2 after being cut from the stock strip is turned edgewise and either slid into the groove 15 or picked up and dropped in that groove. When in such position, the cross bar extends approximately flush with the top of the die block and projects above the hardened members 9 and 10.

With the bar 2 positioned in the slot 15 between the members 9 and 10, as seen in FIGURE 5, an upper notching die 16 having rounded depending projections 17 thereon which fit into the transverse grooves 7 in the die block 6, is brought down under pressure upon the exposed upper edge of the bar 2. This operation provides spaced notches 18 in the bar 2, and because of the concave rerecesses 14 at the same time provides a laterally widened saddle 19 at the base of each notch upon which the wires 3 may seat. It will be noted that this saddle is considerably wider than the thickness of the bar 2 and therefore not only adds strength to the bar but also provides more than adequate seating for each wire when in the bar notch. As seen in FIGURE 8, the grooves 7 in the die block 6 limit the downward motion of the notching die 16.

At station C, the wires 3 are disposed in the grooves of the base die 6 and in the notches 0f the bar 2, as seen in FIGURE 6.

At station D, a compression die 20 is brought down upon the upper edge of the bar 2 as seen in FIGURES 7 and 9. This die is provided with projecting lands 21 to contact the upper edge of the bar 2 between adjacent notches 18, and between these lands the die is relieved as indicated at 22 by an arcuate recess to overlie each of the wires 3. One simple downward movement of the die 20 is sufiicient to compress the upper marginal portion of the bar 2 and cause it to flow laterally into the space within the groove 8 of the base die above the hardened members 9 and 10 and provide substantially a T-shaped upper portion 23 on the bar as seen best in cross section in FIGURE 12. At the same time, each T formation also flows to some extent transversely to the axes of the wires 3 and overlaps these wires to a material extent as indi cated at 24 so that only approximately /5 of the circumference of each wire is exposed. Thus, the wires are firmly and securely anchored to the bars to a greater extent than was accomplished heretofore, and the relatively thin bars are materially strengthened by the T formation.

At the same time the wires are so locked in each of the cross bars 2, the front cross bar 2a which is formed identically as above described, is additionally provided with upstanding spaced inner and outer lugs or projections 25 and 26 respectively each of which is considerably thinner than the thickness of the bar. These lugs may be arranged oppositely each other, or staggered with respect to the inner and outer lugs as shown in FIG- URES 10 and 14 and, in effect, form a track to receive the front trim member in a manner to be later described.

The lugs 25 and 26 are provided with a compression die 20a having all of the features of the die 20, but which is provided with spaced inner and outer voids or recesses 27 and 28. When the upper edge portion of this bar is pressed into T-shape, a part of the upper margin of the bar will partially fill those voids and form the lugs as seen in FIGURES 10 and 11.

The process described to date results in that portion ofthe shelf comprising the two or more cross bars and the wires locked to those cross bars. It will be noted that the wires need only be cut into desired lengths, no other shaping or heading of these wires being necessary. It should further be noted that two simple press operations are all that is required to shape and strengthen the cross bars and unite the wires firmly thereto. Riveting or peening of the ends of the wires to any structure has been totally eliminated.

Any suitable form of side members may be provided on the shelf, depending upon the particular character and use of the shelf. By way of example, I have illustrated side members for a cantilever shelf. One of these side members is best seen in FIGURE 13 and comprises a reinforced member 29 having a hook formation 30 on the rear end thereof for supporting the shelf. The extension 4 on the end of each bar 2 is passed through a suitable aperture in the side member and riveted thereto as indicated at 31 in FIGURE 16.

To complete the shelf it is simply necessary to easily attach a preformed front trim member 32 which functions as a decorative medium as well as a handle in the event the shelf is of the glideout type. The trim member may be given any desirable shape, and in the illustrated instance it has a hollow body portion as seen best in FIGURE 15 with a downwardly turned flange 33 for engagement between the aforesaid lugs 25 and 26. On the underside thereof the trim member has a groove formation 34 to receive the lower edge of the front cross bar 2a.

This trim member 32 may be attached by placing the flange 33 between the inner and outer lugs 25 and 26, pressing downwardly and snapping the groove formation 34 into engagement with the lower edge of the cross bar 2a. Should it be desired to have a closure or partial closure at the ends of the trim 32, which might be opened up somewhat in such a snap-on operation, it will be noted that the trim member may be telescoped from one end to the other across the front cross bar of the shelf, sliding the flange 33 along between the lugs 25 and 26 and sliding the groove formation along the under edge of the bar 2a. In either way the preformed trim ring is simply and expeditiously attached. It should also be noted that with the instant shelf, the trim ring may be made any desired color contrasting with that of the shelf, without any difliculty since the wires and cross bars are not fixedly attached to any portion of the trim member.

From the foregoing it is apparent that I have provided a method of manufacturing metallic shelving which requires only a few simple steps, namely cutting operations on bar stock that may be unwound from a coil and the simple severance of wire lengths, and two easy press operations. The side members 29 may be connected to the cross bars of the main shelf portion at any time during the process that may be desired. The process is simple, lends itself to automation, and results in the provision of a comparatively stronger shelf with the use of lighter material, and the wires are firmly anchored. The result of the practice of the method is an economical highly eflicient and pleasantly appearing shelf structure.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. The method of making a metallic shelf structure, including the steps of feeding and unrolling cross-bar stock from a supply coil,

severing cross-bar lengths from said stock in a manner to provide a projecting tongue on each end of a cross-bar,

placing each cross-bar on edge,

notching each cross-bar by downward pressure to provide space-d notches therealong with a widened saddle at the base of each not-ch, placing wires in said notches 011 said saddles, flattening the upper marginal portion of each crossbar into a T-shape by downward pressure between said notches in a manner to cause said flattened portions to overlie the wires and anchor the same in said notches, and riveting said tongues to shelf side members. 2. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure, the steps of cutting front and rear cross-bars from a coil of stock, placing said cross-bars on edge, forming spaced notches in said bars with a widened saddle laterally of the bar at the bottom of each notch by transverse pressure on an edge of each bar, placing wires in the notches of said cross-bars on said saddles, and flattening the upper portions of said bars between said notches to reinforce the bars and cause the flattened portions to flow longitudinally of the bar and overlap said wires and hold the same in place. 3. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure, the steps of cutting front and rear cross-bars from a coil of stock, placing said cross-bars on edge, forming spaced notches in said bars with a widened saddle at the bottom of each notch by downward pressure, placing wires in the notches of said cross-bars on said saddles, flattening the upper marginal portions of said bars between notches laterally and longitudinally of the bars to strengthen the bars and anchor the wires in place, simultaneously forming spaced upstanding lugs on the upper edge of the front bar, and engaging a trim member with said lugs. 4. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure, the steps of placing a cross-bar on edge, simultaneously providing spaced notches in said bar and forming a laterally widened saddle at the base of each notch, placing a wire in each notch on the saddle, and by downward compression on the upper edge of said bar flattening the same into a transverse upright T- shape and flowing the metal longitudinally of the bar partially over said wires to anchor the same to said bar. 5. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure, the steps of providing spaced notches in a cross-bar, placing wires in said notches, and compressing said bar between notches into an upright T-shape and flowing metal longitudinally of the 'bar partially over said wires to anchor the same to said bar.

6. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure,

the steps of placing a cross-bar on edge,

compressing spaced notches in said bar,

placing a wire in each of said notches, and

compressing the upper marginal portion of said bar between said notches to flow metal longitudinally of the bar partially over said wires and form a flattened and laterally widened area in the bar extending between each pair of adjacent notches.

7. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure,

the steps of compressing spaced notches inwardly from the edge in a cross-bar and simultaneously forming a laterally widened saddle at the base of each notch,

placing a wire in each said notch on the respective saddle, and

compressing said cross-bar between notches to form a laterally widened portion in the bar between notches and flow metal partially over said Wires to anchore the same on said saddles.

8. In a method of making a metallic shelf structure,

the steps of compressing spaced notches inwardly from the edge in a cross-bar and simultaneously forming a laterally widened saddle at the base of each notch,

placing a Wire in each said notch on the respective saddle, and

compressing said cross-bar between said notches to flow metal partially over said Wires to anchor the lugs on the edge of the cross-bar to anchor a trim member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS M-iles 14025 X Lachman 29l60 Carney 2l1l53 Lave 29-160 Brian 29-160 X Paullus et a1. 29-163.5 Jardin 29163.5

JOHN F. CAMPBELL, Primary Examiner. same and in the same operation provide upstanding 15 THOMAS H. EAGER, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3889345 *Oct 15, 1973Jun 17, 1975Elektriska Svetsnings AbMethod and apparatus for manufacture of floor gratings
US5273354 *Jun 25, 1991Dec 28, 1993Donnelly CorporationMolded refrigerator shelf and support bracket
US5297486 *Aug 14, 1991Mar 29, 1994Donnelly CorporationBracket and shelf
US5362145 *Mar 7, 1991Nov 8, 1994Donnelly CorporationMolded refrigerator shelf
US5403084 *Nov 15, 1993Apr 4, 1995Donnelly CorporationMolded refrigerator shelf with snap-in slide
US5406894 *Nov 4, 1993Apr 18, 1995Donnelly Technology, Inc.Shelving system
US5429433 *Jun 29, 1994Jul 4, 1995Donnelly Technology, Inc.Molded refrigerator shelf
US5441338 *Jul 27, 1992Aug 15, 1995Donnelly CorporationSnap-on shelf
US5454638 *Feb 21, 1995Oct 3, 1995Donnelly Technology, Inc.Adjustable refrigerator shelving
US5524981 *Oct 1, 1993Jun 11, 1996Donnelly Technology, Inc.Molded refrigerator shelf and support bracket
US7121004 *Jun 3, 1999Oct 17, 2006Columbia Manufacturing Corp.Method of fabricating security door
US7237855Aug 21, 2003Jul 3, 2007Saint-Gobain Glass FranceShelf for supporting articles, particularly in refrigerated installations
US7300122Dec 14, 2004Nov 27, 2007Saint-Gobain Glass FranceShelf for supporting articles, particularly in refrigerated installations
US7850805Dec 13, 2004Dec 14, 2010Saint-Gobain Glass FranceShelf for supporting articles, particularly in refrigerated installations
US8231191Feb 16, 2007Jul 31, 2012Saint-Gobain Glass FranceShelf for supporting articles, particularly in refrigerated installations
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/897.15, 29/513, 29/514, 211/153
International ClassificationB21D47/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21D47/00
European ClassificationB21D47/00