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Publication numberUS3270754 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1966
Filing dateSep 22, 1964
Priority dateSep 22, 1964
Also published asUS3446667
Publication numberUS 3270754 A, US 3270754A, US-A-3270754, US3270754 A, US3270754A
InventorsLove Robert G, Moeller R E, Pittman Forrest C
Original AssigneeHalliburton Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for employing fluid jets to remove material from articles
US 3270754 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SePL'G, 1966 R. E. MoELLr-:R ETAI. 3,270,754

APPARATUS FOR EMPLOYING FLUID JETS 'l'O REMOVE V MATERIAL FROM ARTICLES Filed Sept. 22, v1964 4 Sheets-Sheet l om @E N m m @n T mmm NL Pv. ELG. v T NMTS I mE @wm RRF A TTORNEY-S'.

Sept. 6, 1966 R. E. MOELLER ETAL 3,270,754

APPARATUS FOR EMPLOYING FLUD JETS TO REMOVE MATERIAL FROM ARTICLES Filed Sept. 22, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet P,

FIG 4 INVENTORS. R. E. MOELLER ROBERT G. LOVE BY FORREST C. PITTMAN ,5mg ,0mg /Ma; 93M@ f )MAA- .11 TTOR N E YS.

3,270,754 APPARATUS FOR EMPLOYING FLUID JETS TO REMOVE Filed Sept. 22, 1964 Y R. E. MOELLER ETAL Sept. '6. 1966 MATERIAL FROM ARTICLES 4 Sheets-Sheet i',

FIG. 6

INVENTOR I R. E. MOELLER ROBERT G. LOVE FORREST C. PITTMANA SII/544Mo, mz,

A TTOR NE XZ Sept. 6; 1966 R. E. MoELLl-:R ETAL 3,270,754

l APPARATUS FOR EMPLOYING FLUID JETS TO REMOVE MATERIAL FROM ARTICLES Filedsepnzz, 1964 4 s11eets-sheet 4.

NVENTORS. R. E. MOELLER ROBERT G. LOVE BY FORREST C. PITTMAN ZM, mf/ mm3 uw IAM.;

A 7 TOR NEKX United States Patent O 3,270,754 APPARATUS FOR EMPLOYING FLUID .IETS TO REMOVE MATERIAL FROM ARTICLES R. E. Moeller, Robert G. Love, and Forrest C. Pittman,

Duncan, Okla., assignors to Halliburton Company,

Duncan, Okla., a corporation of Delaware Filed Sept. 22, 1964, Ser. No. 398,267 11 Claims. (Cl. 134-110) This invention relates to methods and .apparatus for removing material from the interior of open ended particles. In particular it relates t-o the removal of explosives such as solid propellants from lthe interior of generally cylindrical housings such as rocket motor cases.

It is well known that explosives which have been stored for certain periods of time may become func- `tionally unreliable. |For `this reason, it is often necessary to dispose of explosives which have been in storage in excess of an allowable time` period. However, in accomplishing this disposal, it may be desirable to salvage the housings containing such overage explosives for future reuse.

It has long been recognized Ithat jets of high pressure fluids may be employed to remove overage explosives from cylindrical housings. However, techniques, heretofore employed have been characterized by substantial disadvantages.

In general, devices employed .to remove overage explosives from their housings have been characterized by such structural complexity as to not be readily movable from site -to site. dn addition, many devices have been incapable of effectively and safely handling large explosive units such as modern propellant motor cases. Many devices which have utilized high pressure jets to remove explosives have not been able to successfully handle fluid pressures of .a very high magnitude.

A large number of explosive removal devices previously developed have presented problems from the .standpoint of removing cuttings, i.e. jetted away explosive segments, from the jetting site so .as to avoid interference with the explosive removal operation.

Other difficulties have been encountered in maintaining a substantially uniform material removal rate and in forming -cuttings of a generally uniform size.

In recognition of the need for an improved fluid jetting type of material removing apparatus and technique, it is an object of ythe present invention to provide apparatus for removing material from the interior of articles which substantially -obviate disadvantages such as those heretofore described.

It is a particular object of the invention to provide such improved apparatus which can successfully handle high-pressure, material removing -jets over sustained periods of time.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide such improved apparatus which may be used in yremoving relatively large volumes of explosives materials, such as propellants, from rocket motor cases and to tend to form cuttings of a substantially similar size.

It is likewise .an object of the invention to provide an improved =jet material removing .technique by means of which relatively large segment shaped cuttings may be formed.

It is likewise .an object of the invention to provide an improved .apparatus which is portable and which is capable of accommodating a variety of article shapes, sizes 'and configurations.

An additional object of the invention is to provide improved apparatus including a continuously operable and effective system for collecting and recovering cuttings.

A still further object of the invention is to provide suc-h improved apparatus wherein the cuttings do not adversely ICC interfere with subsequent jetting or material removing operations.

It is also an object of the invention to provide such improved apparatus which provide for selectively variable and independently controllable relative rotation and axial movement between an article and .a jet forming mechanism.

It is also an object of the invention to provide such improved apparatus by means of which fluid spray generated during the material removing operation is effectively contained.

It is likewise an object of the invention t-o provide such improved apparatus wherein the material cutting jets may be selectively Adirected as required so as to remove material from 4article niches or partially shielded areas of the article interior.

A portable apparatus herein presented for accomplishing .the foregoing objectives includes skid means and tower means. Pivot mean-s connect the tower means with vthe skid means whereby the tower means may be pivoted toward the skid means for storage for transporting purposes. Tower securing means are provided to lreleasably secure the tower means in ya -generally upright -or operable position. Holding means are included in the apparatus for supporting an article with an open end facing generally downwardly. Elevating means are carried by the tower means for raising and lowering the holding means along a generally vertical and stationary axis. Drive means are included for rotating the holding means 4about a generally vert-ical axis. Fluid discharging means are provided. The fluid discharging means is adapted to remain stationary while entering the open end of an `article which is being lowered and to direct fluid jets against -material to be removed from ythe article interior.

Additionally, .significant but somewhat more limited aspects of this invention pertain .to particular structural characteristics of the holding means, elevating means, and drive means as well as .the iluid discharging means of the apparatus. Of additional significance are the structural details of removed material, i.e. cuttings, receiving means which a-re incorporated in rthe apparatus.

In describing the invention reference will be made t-o a preferred apparatus embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

-In the drawings: i

FIGURE 1 is a schematic, side elevational view of the overall apparatus with -the tower means erected and illustrating .the initial loading of a rocket motor case from which propellant material is to be removed;

FIGURE 2 is a schematic, .side elevational view of the FIGURE 1 apparatus showing .the loaded case in its elevated position and a composite, fluid discharging and cylindrical housing assembly moved into axial alignment with and beneath the elevated case;

FIGURE 3 is a schematic, side elevational View of the FIGURE l apparatus illustrating the lowering of the case over the jet forming, fluid discharging means and into the spray shielding housing of the apparatus to initiate the propellant material removing operation;

FIGURE 3a is a schematic, fragmentary, end elevational view of the FIGURE 1 apparatus as viewed along section line 3ft-3a of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 4 is -a schematic, enlarged, side elevational view of the FIGURE l apparatus illustrating structural details not shown in FIGURE l;

FIGURE 5 is still further enlarged, fragmentary, partially sectioned, and elevational view of article holding, elevating, and rotating components of the FIGURE 1 apparatus;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view of the FIGURE 5 assembly a-s viewed along the section line 6 6;

FIGURE 7 is a partially sectional, enlarged, and frag- 3 mentary view of the apparatus as viewed along the section line '7-7 of FIGURE 4 and illustrating structural details of the fluid discharging means of the apparatus;

FIGURE 8 is still further enlarged, fragmentary, sectioned, and elevational View of the upper end of the fluid discharging means shown in FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged, schematic, fragmentary and partially sectioned plan view of a filter mechanism associated with the FIGURE 4 apparatus and utilized t0 receive cuttings removed during the jetting operation; and

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged, schematic view illustrating channels which may be formed in material being removed from an article interior so as to form generally similarly sized and configured, wedge shaped cuttings or segments of propellant material.

FIGURES 1 through 9 illustrate, in varying detail, structural details of a preferred portable apparatus which may be utilized in the field for removing propellant material from the interior of rocket motor cases.

Principal apparatus components Principal components of this portable apparatus include skid means 1 and tower means 2. Conventional pivot means 3 connect the 'tower means 2 with the skid means 1 whereby the tower means 2 may be pivoted toward the skid means lfor storage and transporting purposes. Tower securing, bracing means 4 a-re provided to releasably secure the tower means 2 in a generally upright or vertical position as shown in FIGURE 1.

1 A holding means 5 is provided for supporting rocket motor 6. An elevating means 7, carried by tower means 2, is provided for raising and lowering the holding means 5 along a generally vertical and stationary axis. A drive means 8 is provided for rotating the holding means 5 about a generally vertical axis. A fluid discharging means 9 is adapted to remain stationary 'while entering the open lower end of a motor 6 which is being lowered on the holding means 5 and to direct fluid jets against propellant material to be removed from the article.

The apparatus further includes removed propellant material receiving means 10 for collecting the propellant cuttings which are removed from the motor 6 by jets discharging from the uid discharging means 9.

Structural details of major components As shown in FIGURES 1 through 4, skid means 1 may comprise a pair of elongate and generally parallel, bevel ended, channel members 101 and 102. Channel members 101 and 102 may Ibe rigidly interconnected by transverse bracing means such as the schematically shown framing components 103 and 104.

Skid means 1 may be provided with a bracket 105 for supporting 4the tower means 2 in an inclined position as hereinafter described. Bracket 105 may comprise a pair of channel members each of which defines an upwardly inclined extension of a skid channel member- One such channel member 106 extends upwardly from, and is rigidly connected with, the skid channel 101. The upper ends of the two inclined, bracket channel members projecting from the skid channel members 101 and 102 may be rigidly interconnected by a transverse framing member 107.` One or more framing members 108 are rigidlyv connected to transverse framing member 107 and project generally vertically upwardly and support a tower cradle means 109 as schematically shown.

rTower means 2 comprises a pair of laterally spaced, but parallel channel members 201 and 202 which are rigidly interconnected by transverse framing members such .as the schematically shown framing members 203, 204 vand 205. Transverse tower member 204 is so positioned as to be receivable in nested relationship upon the cradle means 109 when the tower means 2 is pivoted counterclockwise as shown in FIGURE 1 toward the skid means 1 for storage or transporting purposes.

. Pivot means 3 includes a pair of apertured, link-like members 301 and 302 which are rigidly connected to,

and project from, the lower ends of the tower channel members 201 and 202. T-wo link receiving pivot mounts 303 and 304 are rigidly mounted on skid means 1 by conventional framing not shown. Tower channel member 202 is pivotally connected to pivot mount 304 by a conventional rod like pivot shaft 30S which extends transversely through the assembly 304 and intersects an apertured portion of link 302. Similarly, a conventional rod like pivot shaft 306 transversely intersects pivot mount 303 and an apertured portion of link 301 so as to pivotally secure the tower channel member 201 to the pivot mount 303.

Pivotable movement of tower means 2 about pivot means 3 may be conveniently accomplished by a conventional, hydraulic tower erecting mechanism. This hydraulic tower lifting mechanism, which may be viewed as a component of tower means 2, includes a pair of identical piston and cylinder assemblies. One such assembly, as shown in FIGURE 4, includes a cylinder 206 housing piston means including a piston rod 207 which projects therefrom. Cylinder 206 is connected by a conventional pivot mount 208 to a framing assembly 209, which assembly extends transversely between channel members 101 and 102. Piston rod 207, at its outer end, is connected by a conventional pivot connection 210 to transverse, tower framing member 205.

Pressurized hydraulic fluid may be supplied to the cylinders 206 in a conventional fashion so as to cause the selective extension or retraction of the piston rods 207, in unison, so as to cause the raising or lowering, respectively, of the tower means 2.

When the tower means 2 is disposed in its generally upright or vertically extending position as shown in FIG- URES 1 through 4, it is desirable to provide means for releasably securing the tower means 2 in this operational position.

The tower securing means 4 may comprise a plurality 0f strut-like members extending between the skid means 1 and the tower means 2. Thus, skid means 1 may be provided with a pair of transversely apertured, strut mounts 401 and 402 which are rigidly connected to transverse framing member 103, A pair of struts 403 and 404 may be pivotally connected to mount 401 by a conventional pivot pin 405. A conventional threaded fastener 406 may detachably 4secure lthe upper end of strut 403 to a transversely apertured mounting ear 407 which is rigidly attached to transverse, tower means framing member 203. Similarly, a conventional threaded fastener 408 may `detachably secure the upper end of strut 404 to a transversely apertured ear 409 which is rigidly connected to transverse, tower means framing member 204.

Another pair of struts 410 and 411 extend respectively from tower means framing members 203 to 204 to pivot mount 402. Conventional threaded fasteners 412 and 413 detachably secure the upper ends of struts 410 and 411 to mounting ears 414 and 415 which are secured, respectively, to framing members 203 and 204.

As will be apparent, by removing the threaded fasteners 412 and 413, 406 and 408, the struts 410, 411, 402, and 403 may be detached from the tower means 2 so as to enable the tower means to be folded toward the skid means 1 and cradled upon the tower cradle means 109. With the tower means thus folded toward the skid means 1, the struts 402, 403, 410 and 411 may be pivoted about the pivot mounts 401 and 402, in a generally clockwise direction as shown in FIGURE 4, so as to rest upon components of the skid means 2.

Clamping means 5 is'adapted to embracingly engage and clamp the cylindrical periphery of the rocket motor 6.

Clamping means 5 includes a top plate 501 having a. generally frustoconical, upwardly projecting center por-- tion 502. Plate 501 may be of a generally circular con-- figuration in plan view. A lower plate 503 of lesser diameter than top plate 501 may be connected to the lower not shown, such as' threaded'fasteners.

An arcuate support plate 504 may be attached on one end to lower plate 503 by conventional fastening means such as welding so as to project axially downwardly away from the top plate 501. Support plate 504 preferably has a circumferential extent of less than 180.

Support means 5 further includes a first, generally semicylindrical clamping plate 505 and a second, generally semi-cylindrical clamping plate 506. Clamping plate 505 is provided with a resilient lining 507 which may be fabricated, for example, from sponge rubber while clamping plate 506 is provided with a similar resilient lining 508. Hinge means 509, having a generally vertical hinge axis, hingedly interconnect clamping plates 505 and 506.

'Clamping plate 505 may be provided with a plurality of radially outwardly projecting webs by means of which it is detachably connected to radially inwardly projecting webs carried by the support plate 504. One such web connecting arrangement is shown in FIGURE 6. As there shown, a vertically extending web 510 formed on support plate 504 contiguously overlaps a web 511 carried on clamp plate 505. Conventional threaded fasteners 512 serve to detachably connect the webs 511 and 510 so as to detachably secure the hingedly interconnected clamping plates 505 and 506 to the support plate 504. Through this detachable clamp mounting arrangement, hingedly interconnecting clamping plates may be replaced as required in accordance with the dimensions and shapes of individual rocket cases to be handled by the apparatus.

A pair of schematically shown, conventional, overcenter latches 513 and 514 may be employed to interconnect the free edges of the clamping plates 505 and S06. As will be appreciated, such latching mechanisms will tend to draw with the free edges 50551 and 506a of the clamping plates 505 and 506 together while the clamps are being secured.

The clamping plates 505 and 506 may be tailored such that they may be closed about the periphery of a particular size of rocket motor case in substantially embracing engagement. When the overcenter latches 513 and 514 are closed, the plates 505 and 506 are tightly constricted about the cylindrical periphery of the rocket motor 6, with the liners 507 and 508 being compressed between the plates 505 and 506 and the rocket case periphery. In this fashion, the clamping means 5 is effectively clamped about the rocket motor 6 and capable of supporting the weight of the rocket motor while the holding means 5 is elevated. As will be apparent, the rocket motor case 6 will be secured by the holding means 5 with its open end facing generally downwardly.

A typical rocket motor case 6 to be handled by the apparatus will have a cylindrical side wall 601 and an open end 602. The upper end 603 of the rocket motor case will either be closed or have an aperture which will be closed -by a conventional threaded plug during the propellant removing operation. Ordinarily, the propellant charge 604 contained within the interior of the rocket motor case will be annular in configuration, i.e. will have a central passage 605 extending axially through the motor case. Rocket case reinforcing rings, such as the schematically shown ring 606, may project into the propellant charge.

Elevating means 7 includes a vertically movable frame 701 which is mounted for reciprocation on the rail defining, channel members 201 and 202 of the tower means 2. Frame means 701 may include mirror yimage configured side wall portions 702 and 703 which are interconnected by an arcuate leading edge portion 704. Frame means 701 may further include a top plate 705 having an aperture 706 as shown in FIGURE 5.

Bearing or slide-like abutments 707 are rigidly carried on frame means side plates 701 and 703. As schematically shown in FIGURES 1 through 4, these slide-like abutments 707 project inwardly from the slide plates of slide means 701 so as to be disposed on opposite sides of each of the tower channel members 201 and 202 and slid- 6 ably engage these tower components. In this fashion, the frame means 701 is slidably mounted on the rail-defining tower channel members 201 and 202 and stabilized on these tower components so as to be able to project generally outwardly in a cantilever fashion.

Conventional and schematically shown hoisting means are provided on frame means 701. This hoisting means may include a pneumatically operated winch 708 which is supported upon a generally U-shaped bracket 709 as shown in FIGURE 5. A flexible hoisting chain 710 extends from hoist 708 to a swivel joint 711 having a vertical axis of swivel movement. A conventional hook 712 may be employed to detachably connect the swivel joint 711 with an eye 515 which projects upwardly from, and is threadably connected to, the plate projection 502. An open top, semi-cylindrical container 713 may be provided to contain and receive the free end of the hoisting chain 710.

As illustrated, the chain 710, swivel joint 711, and hook 712 are disposed so as to be movable vertically through the aperture 706 of the frame means 701.

As will be understood, the pneumatically operated winch 708 may be employed to maintain a continuous upward biasing force on the holding means 5 or may include a conventional, self-actuating, braking mechanism so as to positively secure the holding means 5 at any desired position of elevation.

Vertical raising and lowering of the frame means 701 on tower means 2 may be accomplished by a conventional lhydraulic piston and cylinder arrangement. This arrangement may include a cylinder 211 which is mounted upon a bracket 212 extending between links 301 and 302 as shown in FIGURE 3a. Cylinder 211 houses piston means including a piston rod 213 which projects upwardly to engage a bracket 214 on tower means 701. By means of conventional iiuid coupling arrangements and a conventional source of pressurized hydraulic fluid and conventional flow control means, not shown, the frame means 701 may be selectively elevated or lowered along the tower means 2 as desired.

Structural details of drive means 8 which is employed to rotate holding mean-s 5 about a generally vertical axis are shown in FIGURES 5 and 6.

Drive means 8 includes a clutch-like, drive plate 801 having a cent-ral aperture 802. Aperture 802 has a diameter conforming generally to the diameter of the base of projection 502 of top plate 501. As illustrated, aperture 802 may be sloped upwardly so as to conform generally to the conical configuration of the base portion of the projection 502.

An annular ring gear 803 is connected to drive plate 801 by conventional fastening means such as the schematically shown, threaded fasteners 804. A mounting ring 805 is connected to plate 705 yof frame means 701 by conventional fastening means such as the schematically shown, threaded fasteners 806. Mounting r-ing 805 and ring gear 803 are interconnected by bearing means such as the schematically shown, ball bearings 807. In this fashion, ring gear S03 is mounted on frame means 701 for roation about a generally vertical axis when the tower means 2 is upright.

A pinion-type drive gear 808, having a vertical axis of rotation when the tower means 2 is erected, is mounted upon a shaft 809 extending from a conventional, pressurized fluid operated motor 810. Motor 810, as schematically shown, is mounted upon frame means plate 705. Drive gear 808 is supported on shaft 809 so as to be in meshing and driving engagement with the interior, toothed portion of ring gear 803.

`Clamping means are incorporated in drive means 8 to releasably secure the drive plate 801 to the top plate 501 of the holding means 5 in a generally clutch-like fashion. The clamping means are carried by and movable with the drive plate 801 and comprise a plurality of pivoted clamps 811. As shown in FIGURE 6, the preferred embodiment includes three symmetrically disposed clamps 811. Each such clamp 811 is pivotally supported on a conventional pivot mount 812. A pivot shaft 813 of each such mount has a pivot axis extending generally perpendicular to a radius extending rfrom the axis of rotation of the drive pla-te 801.

Each clamp 811 has a generally C-shaped portion 814 which projects generally outwardly from the drive plate 801 and an operating lever portion 815 which projects generally toward the axis of rotation of the drive plate 801. As illustrated, the C-shaped clamp portion 814 is adapted to curve around the edges of the abutting drive plate 801 and top plate 501 so as to engage the underside of the top plate 501 and clutchingly press it against the under-side of drive plate 801. A conventional compression-type coil spring 816 is mounted on the top of drive plate 801in association with each clamp 811. Each spring 816 engages the underside of a clamp lever portion 815 so as to bias the lC-shaped clamp portion 814 into the position shown in FIGURE where it holds the top plate 501 against the drive plate 801. With a clamp 811 thus disposed, its lever portion 815 is inclined slightly upwardly and away from the pivot shaft 813.

As will be appreciated, the alignment of the plates 501 and 801 which enables the clamps 811 to hold them securely together is insured by the cooperation of the projection 502 with the aperture 802.

A clamp releasing mechanism is carried by the plate 705 of the trarne means 701. This clamp releasing means is adapted to engage the lever portions 815 of the clamps 811 so as to lrelease the clamps from the plate 501 and allow the plate 501 to be disengaged from Ithe drive plate 801.

This clamp releasing means includes a ring 817 which is carried by the plate 705 of the frame means 701 above the clamp lever portions 815 as shown in FIGURE 5. Ring 817 is supported on plate 705 by a plurality of rod Iand spring assemblies symmetrically disposed about the ring 817. In the preferred embodiment, three such assemblies may be provided, each including a rod 818 which is threadably engaged to the ring 817 and projects upwardly through a plate aperture 705a and has an enlarged upper end which may be formed by a washer and nut assembly 819. A conventional coil spring 820 extends between the assembly 819 and the top of the plate '705 and encircles the -rod 818. Each spring 820 is a compression type spring and tends to urge its associated rod 818 upwardly so as to hold the ring 817 against the underside of the plate 705 and thus out of contact with the clamp lever portions 815.

The lowering or depression of the rings 817 into clamp releasing engagement with the clamp lever portions 815 is accomplished by a plurality of pressurized iluid actuated piston and cylinder assemblies which also are symmetrically disposed about the ring 817 and carried by the plate 705. In the preferred embodiment, three such assemblies may be provided. Each such assembly may include a cylinder defining housing 821 and may contain a piston 822 having a piston rod 823 extending through a plate aperture 705b into threaded engagement with the ring 817. By supplying pressurized fluid through a conventional conduit 824 under the inuence of conventional control means, not shown, the pistons 822 may be simultaneously depressed or moved downwardly so as to in turn move the ring 817 downwa-rdly into clamp-releasing engagement with the clamp lever portions 815. As will be appreciated, when the ring 817 engages the clamp lever 815, the C-shaped clamp portions 814 are pivoted generally upwardly and outwardly out of engagement with the top plate 501.

As illustrated, engagement and disengagement of the clamp portions 814 with the underside of the top plate 501 may be facilitated by a beveled, lower edge 501a of plate 501 as shown in FIGURE 5.

As schematically shown in FIGURE l and shown in further detail in FIGURE 4, iluid discharging means 9 and removed material receiving means 10 comprises a unitary or composite assembly which is movable into and out of axial alignment with an elevated article supporting holding means 5.

Fluid discharging means 9 of this assembly includes rst tubular conduit means 901 having a generally vertical axis and second tubular conduit means 902 which also has a generally vertical axis. As illustrated in FIGURE 7, second conduit means 902 is mounted coaxially within and is spaced from rst conduit means 901 so as to define one fluid flow path 903 within the second conduit means 902 and another, ilow path 904 which is of an annular character and lies between the conduit means 901 and 902.

A manifold-like spray head 905 sealingly engages the upper ends 901a and 902a of the conduit means 901 and 902 respectively. As shown in FIGURE 8, the upper end 901a of rst conduit means 901 threadably and sealingly engages an internally threaded portion 905:1 of manifold 905. The upper end 902a of second conduit means 902 is provided with sealing means such as conventional O-rings 906. Upper end 902a of conduit means 902 is telescopingly received within a bore-like portion 905b of manifold 905, with the seal rings 906 sealingly interconnecting the conduit end '2a with the bore 905b. As illustrated, a body portion 905C of manifold 905 prevents luid communication between the upper ends 901a and 902a of the conduits 901 and 902 respectively.

A plurality of jet dein-ing nozzles 907 are carried by the -spray head or manifold 905 and communicate with the upper end of the conduit 901 so as to be in fluid communication with the passage 904. Three such nozzles 907, for example, may be provided with each nozzle 907 having an axis inclined generally downwardly as shown in FIGURE 8, i.e. inclined at an angle of inclination measured downwardly from a vertical axis and exceeding 90.

A second plurality of nozzles 908 are carried by the manifold 90S in uid communication with the upper end 902a of the inner conduit 902, so as to communicate with the central flow passage 903. For example, three such nozzles 908 may be provided Which are symmetrically disposed about the common longitudinal axes of the conduit means 901 and 902. Each such nozzle 908 is inclined downwardly away from a vertical axis at an langle not exceeding about 90. While the nozzles 908 may be inclined so as to direct jets horizontally, in the arrangement shown in FIGURE 8, the nozzles 908 are inclined so as to direct jets outwardly and somewhat upwardly.

Manifold 905 may also be provided with a plurality of nozzles 909 which are symmetrically disposed about the longitudinal and Vertical axis of the conduits 901 and 902, which nozzles 909 also communicate with the passage 903. As shown, the nozzles 909 are incl-ined at an angle measured downwardly from a vertical axis so as to direct jets upwardly above the jets defined by the nozzles 908, `i.e. the angle of inclination of the jets 909 measured downwardly from the vertical axis is less than the angle of inclination of the jets 908 measured downwardly from the same axis.

As schematically shown in FIGURE 7, first conduit means 901 may be mounted in a T-tting 910 which is connected through conventional couplings 'andV a conventional valve 911 to a conduit 912 adapted to supply pressurized liquid such as water from a conventional source, not shown.

Second conduit means 902 passes through T-tting 910 and is connected with 1a conduit section 913. This latter conduit section communicates through -another T-tting 914 with a conventional valve 915. Fitting 914 rnay be supported on a base 916 so as to close its lower end. As

illustrated, valve 915 is connected by conventional couA 9 from the supply conduit 912 to the nozzles 908 and 909 may be selectively controlled by the valve 915. With this arrangement, fluid flow through the nozzles 907 may be varied in intensity or interrupted independent ofthe flow through the nozzles 908 and 909. Similarly, fiow through the nozzles 908 and 909 may be varied or interrupted independent of the flow through the nozzles 907.

The removed material receiving means includes a generally cylindrical housing 1001 which has an open upper end 100hz and a downwardly converging base 1002 which terminates at its lower end in a flexible, conventional conduit 1003. Conduit 901 intersects base 1002 in sealed relation therewith as schematically shown.

As will be apparent from the drawings, cylindrical housing 1001 encircles conduit means 901 and 902 in generally concentric relationship with. these conduit means. As shown in FIGURE 7, the upper end 1001a of cylindrical housing 1001 extends somewhat above the jet defining spray head 905 and is radially spaced from this sprayhead and the portions of the conduit means 901 which projects above the base 1002.

Cylindrical housing 1001 may be provided with a hinged, doorlike member 1004 to provide convenient access to the interior of the housing 1001. As schematically shown, member 1004 may be provided with transparent window means 1005.

Three symmetrically arranged, leg-like components 1006 support the cylindrical housing .1001 above a horizontally slidable base 1007 and connect the housing 1001 to this base.

As will be apparent, the lateral width of platform 1007 will be such as to enable the platform to move horizontally between the tower pivot mounts 303 and 304 when the housing 1001 is moved toward the tower means 2 so as to bring the fluid discharging means into axial alignment with a rocket motor 6. When the housing 1001 is moved away from the tower means 2, as shown schematically in FIGURE l, the base 1007 may provide a working platform to facilitate the loading of a rocket motor 6 on the article holding means 5.

Base 1007 may be supported on rail means carried by the skid means 1 for horizontal sliding movement into and out of axial alignment with the elevated holding means 5.

As schematically shown in FIGURE 4, base 1007 may be supported on rail-like upper surfaces of the skid channels 101 an-d 102. A block-like base portion 1008 may project downwardly from the lower surface of the base 1007 into the space between the rail defining channels 101 and I102. Base portion 1008 :may engage opposing side faces of these channel members so as to stabilize and guide the base 1007 through its sliding movement along the channel members 101 and 102.

A conventional, pressurized fiuid .actuated piston and cylinder assembly is employed for moving the removed material receiving means 10 and the fiuid discharging means 9 horizontally along the rail defining skid means 1. This assembly, as schematically shown in FIGURE 4, includes a cylinder 1009 which is mounted on a bracket 1010. This `bracket is secured between the skid channels 101 and 102 in a conventional fashion. Piston means contained within the cylinder 1009 includes a piston rod 1011. This rod projects from the cylinder 1009 and engages, at its outer free end, a bracket .1012 which is connected to guide block 1008 as schematically shown. As will be appreciated, by selectively supplying pressurized uid to the cylinder 1009 from a conventional source, not shown, and under the control of conventional pressurized fiuid control means, also not shown, the fluid discharging means 9 and removed material receiving means 10 may be moved horizontally in unison into and out of axial alignment with the elevated article holding means 5.

A filter assembly 1013 is associated with the removed material receiving means 10 and is connected with the housing means 1001 by the flexible conduit 1003. As

10 Will be appreciated, this filter assembly .1013 may remain stationary while the housing means 1001 is moved, by virtue of the fexible nature of the interconnecting conduit 1003.

As schematically shown in FIGURES 4 and 9, filter assembly 1013 includes a coarse filtering assembly comprising alternately oper-able, first and second filter sections 1014 Vand 1015 respectively. This coarse filtering assembly includes a common housing 1016 and an upper plate 1017 which defines a continuation of the conduit means 1003 and supports two filter baskets 1018 and 1019 in first and second filter sections 1014 and .1015 respectively. A fiow diverting plate 1020, mounted on a conventional pivot mount 1021, is horizontally pivotable so as to be able to selectively seal off either the filter 1019 or the filter 1018 from the flow of cuttings and liquid discharging from the conduit 1003. With the ow diverting plate 1020 disposed as shown in FIGURE 9, the iiow of cuttings and liquid from the conduit 1003 passes through the filter section 1018. When the filter 1018 is filled to capacity, the flow diventing plate may be moved counterclockwise, as shown in FIGURE 9, so .as to seal off the filter 1018 and divert the flow of cuttings and liquid to the other filter section 1019. The filter 1018 may then be removed and be cleaned while liquid and cuttings are passing through the filter section 1019.

A conduit 1022 extends from the base of the housing 1016 to a conventional fluid pump .1023 which serves to pump the coarse filtered flow of cuttings and liquid through a conduit string 1024 to a fine filter assembly 1025. As schematically illustrated, fine filter assembly 1025 includes a filter basket 1026 which is supported within a housing 1027. Housing 1027 may be provided with a conventional, outlet defining conduit 1028 for the discharge of filtered liquid.

As shown schematically in FIGURE 4, filter assembly 1013 may be supported upon skid means 1029 to facilitate the positioning of the assembly, as desired, in relation to the skid means 1.

Mode of operation With the structural details of the apparatus having been described, its mode of operation may now be delineated.

As schematically shown in FIGURES 1 through 4, it may be desirable to support the apparatus above the ground for a cleaning operation. Where this is desirable, the skid channels 101 and 102 may be conventionally supported upon transverse timbers such as the schematically shown timbers X and Y.

The apparatus, upon its arrival at an operations site, will be disposed with the tower means 2 folded toward the skid means 1, i.e. the tower framing member 204 will be cradled on the cradle means 109. In order to erect the tower means 2, the piston rods 207 are simultaneously extended so as to pivot the tower means 2 clockwise as shown in FIG. 1. After the tower means has been erected so as to extend generally vertically upright, the struts 403, 404, 410 and 411 are connected to the tower framing components 203 'and 204 so as to secure the tower means 2 in its upright position.

In p-reparation f-or rocket motor case loading, the piston rod 213 will -be in a retracted position so as to support the frame 701 at a low elevation as shown in FIGURE 1. If not previously accomplished, the clamping ring 817 will be depressed so as to move the clamps 811 out of clamping engagement with the plate S01 so that the holding means 5 may be lowered on the chain 710. The power winch 708 is then operated so as to lower the freed holding means 5 into the position generally shown in FIGURE 1 where it is disposed in close proximity to the base 1007. The overcenter clamps 513 and 514 may be freed so as to aillow the clamp portions 505 and 506 to be opened to receive a rocket motor 6. With the rocket motor case 6 disposed between the opened clamp portions 505 and 506, these clamp portions may be closed about the rocket motor periphery so that the clamp liners 507 and 508 are pressed tightly against this periphery. Closing of the overcenter latches 513 and 514 constricts the clamp portion liners 507 and 508 about the rocket motor case peripheries so that the rocket motor case is firmly supported by the holding means with its open end 602 facing downwardly.

FIGURE l schematically illustrates the apparatus after a rocket motor 6 has been connected to the holding means 5. As 4there shown, the piston rod 1011 is extended to the right so as to displace the material receiving means and fluid discharging means 9 from the vicinity of the tower means 2..

With the rocket motor 6 gripped lby the holding means 5, the winch 708 may be again operated so as to raise the chain 710 and move the plate 501 upwardly into engagement with the drive plate y801. In moving upwardly, the top plate projection 502 will enter the drive plate aperture 802 so as to cammingly align these two plates. As will `be appreciated, while the plate 501 is being moved into engagement with the drive plate 801, the clamp releasing ring 817 will be depressed downwardly so as to hold the clamp C-shaped portions 814 out of the travel path of the converging plate 501. When the plate 501 has been brought into function clutching engagement with the drive plate 801, the clamp releasing ring 817 may be retracted upwardly by the springs 820 as a result of the interrupting of the supply of fluid to the cylinders 821. This will allow the springs 816` to pivot the clamps 811 to their clamping position so that the C- shaped clamp portions 814 engage the underside of the plate 501 and hold it securely against the drive plate 801. As a safety measure, the winch '708 may be employed as an additional mechanism for securing holding means 5 against drive plate 801.

After effecting the clutched interengagement of the plates 501 and 801, the piston rod 213 may be extended upwardly so as to raise the frame means 701. Frame means 701 will be positioned at such an elevation as to insure that the housing means 1001 may be moved horizontally toward the tower means 2 into axial alignment with and beneath the rocket motor case 6 supported by the holding means 5. The axial alignment of the housing means 1001 with the elevated rocket motor 6 is schematically shown in FIGURE 2.

Under the influence of conventional control mechanisms, the piston rod 213 may be moved downwardly at a controlled rate so as to lower the frame means 701 and the holding means 5 which supports the rocket motor case 6. With the rocket case 6 moving downwardly, the stationary spray head 905 will enter the central passage 605 of the rocket motor case 6. Fluid jets discharged from the spray heads 905 will impinge upon the material 604 contained within the rocket motor case and cut channels through this material extending to the cylindrical wall 601.

FIGURE 3 illustrates a rocket motor case being lowered into the spray shielding housing 1001. As shown in FIGURE 7, as the spray defining head 905 enters the central passage 605, the propellant char-ge 604 and the cylindrical rocket case wall 601 move into the annular space between the spray head 605 and the housing 1001.

With the rocket case rotating mechanism 8 being functionally independent of the rocket case lowering mechanism 7, the rocket motor case 6 may lbe manipulated in a variety of ways to facilitate the most effective jetting pattern to cause the removal of propellant material 604.

While the rocket case 6 is being lowered, the motor 810 may be actuated by conventional control means to cause c-oncurrent rotation of the drive plate 80-1 at a controlled rate and thus cause the rotation of the holding means 5 and the rocket motor 6. Such combined downward and rotary movement will cause jets issuing from the spray head 905 to cut a generally spiral pattern of cuttings away from the charge 604.

In certain inst-ances it may be desirable to form wedge shaped segments or cuttings tending more positively toward a generally uniform cutting size. This may be accomplished, for example, by initially lowering the rocket motor 6 with jets issuing from the nozzles 908 with no rotary movement being imparted to the rocket motor. After the rocket case 6 has been lowered a predetermined extent, the lowering of the rocket case may be interrupted and the rocket case rotated so as to position the nozzles 908 midway between their formerly occupied positions. The non-rotating rocket case may then be raised with jets issuing from the nozzles 908 so as to form vertically and radially extending channels 607 disposed midway between the vertically and radially extending channels 607 formed while the rocket case was being lowered. The rocket ease may then be relowered and rotated so that the jets issuing from the nozzles 908 cut channels extending to the wall 601 and transversely intersecting the previously cut, vertical channels 607. This technique is particularly useful as a means for avoiding the forming of undesirably long spiral cuttings.

If the rocket case 6 is simultaneously lowered and rotated, the jets issuing `from the nozzles 908 will cut a .spiral pattern intersecting the previously formed, radially extending vertical channel 607. There will thus be formed a spiral-like channel pattern which will transversely intersect the vertical and radial channels 607 so as to form generally wedge-shaped cuttings 608 of propellant material.

Alternatively, after the vertical and radially extending channels 607 have lbeen formed, the propellant motor case may be lowered to a particular degree and then held stationary at a particular elevation and rotated. With this form of rocket case manipulation, jets issuing from the nozzles 908 will form a substantially continuous, generally annular channel pattern through the material 604 and will form generally wedge shaped cuttings 608.

As will be appreciated, the propellant charge 604 may be bonded to the inner wall of the cylindrical casing 601. In practice, it has been found that the jets issuing from the nozzles of the spray head 905, in impinging upon the inner wall of the casing 601, will be deflected laterally so as to effectively cut between the charge 604 and the casing 601 and free the cuttings from the rocket case so that they may fall by gravity onto the housing base 1002 and be flushed by liquid discharging from the spray head into the flexible conduit 1003. This cutting action may be facilitated `by the entrainment of propellant material in the jet streams as they cut through the rliular portion of the charge 604 en route to the wall As will be apparent, internal rocket case structure, such as the ring 606, will impede the flow of spray nozzles 908 so as to prevent the removal of material in niches above the ring 606 adjacent the junction of these rings with the motor case Wall 601. As illustrated in FlG- URE 7, material may be removed from this zone by initiating the flow of jets from the nozzles 907 so that they are directed downwardly and outwardly and generally directly into this partially concealed area.

As will also be apparent, the downwardly directed `force of jets issuing from the nozzles 007 may be employed to facilitate the removal of propellant Aresidue not initially fully removed by the jets 908. For example, after the jets from the nozzles 908 have made an initial material removal while a rocket case 6 is being lowered, the case may be raised and pressurized fluid then directed from the nozzles 907 so as to cut away residual propellant still adhereing to the rocket motor case wall 601.

At the upper end 603 of the rocket motor, the top of the spray head 905 may abut the top -of the rocket motor case so as to prevent the jets issuing from the nozzles 908 from completing the removal of material in the upper end of the rocket motor case 6. In this zone, the more 13 upwardly inclined jets issuing `from the nozzles 909 function to effectively remove propellant material above the spray head 905 which could not otherwise be efficiently removed.

As will be apparent, jets may be `issued from nozzles ,908 and 909 with there being no jets issued from the nozzles 907 and alternatively jets may be issued from the nozzles 907 with there being no flow from the jets 908 and 909. In Ithis manner, the flow of jetting fluid is conserved and minimized, consistent with the forming of jets having an optimum material removing action.

As will be apparent, the desired pattern of jets issuing from the spray head 905 may be obtained by appropriate manipulation of the valves 911 and 915.

It is contemplated that water pressurized to as high as 20,000 pounds per square inch may .be supplied to the discharging means 9. Ordinarily, however, the operating range of water pressure would extend from about 1,000 pounds per square inch to about 15,000 pounds per square inch. As will be appreciated, the length and diameter of the jet defining nozzles may vary depending upon the physical proper-ties of the jetting liquid being utilized and the overall dimensional characteristics of the apparatus and the articles being treated.

As will be appreciated, pressurized fluids for operating the various motors and pistons of the apparatus may be supplied from conventional sources and controlled by conventional fluid flow control systems. The material removing liquid, which may comprise merely water, may be pressurized and supplied by conventional pump systems. These conventional mechanisms, if desired, may be truck or skid mounted consistent with the generally portable nature of the apparatus.

At the conclusion of a propellant removal operation, it may be desirable to move the apparatus to a new operation site. This may be readily accomplished by securing the holding means 5, as `for example, against the drive plate 801, and by lowering the tower means 2so that the tower cross bracing member 204 is cradled on the cradle means 109. The apparatus may t-hen be easily transported or moved to a new site.

Advantages and scope of invention In describing the structure and mode of operation of a preferred embodiment of the propellant removing apparatus, several advantages of the invention have been dernonstrated.

The combination of the skid mount and hinged tower ,structure contributes to the ease with which the apparatus may be handled in a portable fashion and moved between operation sites.

The stationary naturevof the uid discharging means enables cleaning liquids to be employed under unusually high pressures. The stationary nozzle jetting arrangement, with the gravity induced removal of cuttings, insures that these cuttings do not impede subsequent jetting or material removing operations.

The movable nature of the fluid discharging means and the removed material receiving means facilitates the loading of an article from which material is to be removed. The unique combination of these components provides an easily positionable assembly which rnay be disposed as required ffor a material removing operation and which effectively shields spray generated during this operation.

The selectively variable pattern of jets issuing from the spray head conserves on cleaning fluid and enables jets to be directed so as to accomplish the most eilicient material removing action. As will be appreciated, with the nozzle and conduit means arrangement shown, the direction of cutting jets may be changed without interrupting the cleaning operation.

The technique of irst forming radially extending vertical channels and then cutting transversely of these channels through material to be removed, provides a particularly effective and reliable system for forming cuttings of a predictable and generally uniform size.

The differently oriented nozzles of the spray head in combination with the individualized control of iluid to these nozzles, enables the jetting pattern to .be changed as required to removed material from otherwise inaccessible portions of article interiors.

The structural and individually operable characteristics of the elevating means 7 and rotary drive means 8 affords maximum operation reliability in combination with a wide range of variations in movements which may be imparted to the article from which material is to be removed. This drive arrangement particularly facilitates the imparting of controlled movements to the rocket motor case 6 so that the jetting assembly tends to form cuttings of a generally uniform size.

The removed material receiving means provides an effective and contained system for collecting cuttings. This system is continuously operable even though a portion of the ltering system included in this portion of the apparatus becomes temporarily clogged with cuttings.

The ability of the article holding means to be lowered from the elevating mechanism facilitates article loading and avoids the necessity of imparting excessive elevating movement to the elevating means 7 during an article loading operation. This arrangement also facilitates the handling of heavy articles such as rocket motor cases.

The characteristics of the holding means 5 are such as to enable this portion of the apparatus to be conveniently accommodated to a variety of article sizes and configurations and to be easily and rapidly secured to articles.

In describing the invention, reference has been made to preferred apparatus and method embodiments. However, those skilled in the material removing art and familiar with the disclosure of this invention may well recognize additions, deletions, substitutions, or other modifications with reference to the preferred embodiments which would fall within the purview of the overall invention as defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A port-able apparatus for removing material from the interior of open ended articles, said apparatus comprising:

skid means;

tower means;

pivot means connecting said tower means with said skid means whereby said tower means may be pivoted toward said skid means;

tower securing means adapted to releasably secure said tower means in a generally upright position; holding means for supporting an article with an open end thereof facing downwardly;

elevating means carried iby said tower means for raising and lowering said holding means along a generally vertical and stationary axis;

drive means for rotating said holding means about a generally vertical axis; and

fluid discharging means adapted to remain stationary while entering the open end of an arti-cle whichI is being lowered and direct fluid jets `against material to be removed from said article.

2. An apparatus as described in clai-m 1 wherein said holding means comprises:

top plate means;

support plate means extending generally downwardly from said topplate means;

a first, arcuate clamp portion having a resilient, article periphery engaging liner;

a second, arcuate clamp portion having a resilient, article engaging liner;

connecting means securing one of said clamp portions to said support plate; and

latching means for securing sai-d rst and second clamp portions in clamping engagement about an article.

'tower means includes:

track means supporting said frame means for vertical movement therealong;

first, cylinder housed, piston means for raising said tower means to its generally upright position; and

second, cylinder housed, piston means for causing said frame mean-s to move along said track means.

5. An apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein Said drive means inclu-des:

a drive plate;

ring gear means connected with said drive plate;

frame means;

mounting means supporting said drive plate and ring gear means on said frame means for rotation about a vertical axis;

drive gear means meshingly engaging said ring gear means;

motor means for rotating said drive gear means so as to cause rotation of said drive plate about a vertical axis;

clamping means adapted to releasably secure said holding means to said drive plate, said clamping means being carried by and movable with said drive plate; and

cla-mp releasing means carried by said frame means and adapted to engage said clamping means.

6. An apparatus as -described in claim wherein said clamping means comprises a plurality of clamps,

a pivot mounting for each clamp having a pivot axis generally perpendicular to a radius extending from the axis of rotation of said drive plate,

each of said clamps having a generally C-shaped portion projecting generally outwardly from said drive plate and an operating lever portion projecting generally toward the axis of rotation of said drive plate, and

spring means engaging each clamp so as to urge the C-shaped portion thereof to pivot around an edge portion of said drive plate and engage said holding mean-s so Vas to urge said holding means into engage-means Iwith the underside of said drive plate;

wherein said clamp releasing means comprises a ring carried by said frame means above said clamp lever portions,

spring means adapted to urge said ring upwardly away from said clamp lever portions, and

cylinder housed piston means adapted to urge said ring into engagement with all of the clamp lever portions so as to pivot the clamps about their respective pivot yaxes and move the generally C-shaped clamp portions out of engagement with said holding means;

wherein said -drive plate is centrally apertured;

wherein said holding means includes an upwardly converging, central projection adapted to enter the central aperture of said drive plate and align said holding means relative to said drive plate; and

wherein said elevating means is connected to said central projection of said holding means.

7. An apparatus as described in claim 1 wherein said fluid` discharging means includes:

rst nozzle means adapted to direct fluid jets generally outwardly and downwardly;

second nozzle means adapted to direct fiuid jets generally outwardly and at an angle of inclination measured downwardly from a vertical axis not exceeding about ninety degrees; and

valve means for selectively controlling iiuid ow through said first and second nozzle means.

8. An apparatus as described in claim 7 wherein said fluid discharging means includes:

first tubular conduit means having a generally vertical axis;

second tubular conduit means having a generally vertical axis and mounted within and spaced from said rst conduit means so as to define one fluid flow path within said second conduit means and another iluid flow path between said iirst and second conduit means;

manifold means sealingly engaging upper, Open ends of said lirst and second conduit means;

barrier means within said manifold means preventing fluid communicating between the upper, open ends of said rst and second conduit means;

said upper open end of said first conduit means communicating with said first nozzle means; and

said upper open end of said second conduit means communicating with said second nozzle means.

9. An apparatus as described in claim 1 and further including removed material receiving means comprising:

cylindrical housing means encircling and radially spaced from at least the upper portion of said fluid discharging means;

removed material conduit means extending from said housing; and

filtering means including alternately operable, first and second filter sections, and

ilow diverting means for selectively directing flow from said removed material conduit means through said first or said second lilter sections.

10. Anf'apparatus as described in claim 9 wherein said removed material receiving means additionally includes:

rail -means supporting said housing means for generally horizontal movement into and out of axial alignment with said holding means;iand

cylinder housed, piston means for moving said housing means along said rail means.

11. A portable apparatus .for removing material from the interior of open ended articles, said apparatus comprising:

skid means;

tower means;

pivot means connecting said tower means with said skid means whereby said tower means may be pivoted toward said skid means; t tower securing means adapted to releasably secure said tower means in a generally upright position; holding means for supporting an article with an open end thereof lfacing downwardly, said holding means including top plate means, support plate means extending generally downwardly from said top plate means, a first, arcuate clamp portion having a resi-lient,

arti-cle periphery engaging liner, a second, arcuate clamp portion having a resilient,

article engaging liner, connecting means securing one of said clamp portions to said support plate, .and latching means for securing said first and second clamp portions in clamping engagement about an article; elevating means carried by said tower means for raising and lowering said holding means along a generally vertical and stationary axis, said elevating means including vertically movable frame means carried by said tower means,

1 7 hoisting means mounted on said frame means, motor means Ifor operating said reel means, and swivel joint means connecting said hoisting means with said top plate means `whereby said holding means may rotate about a vertical axis relative to said frame means; drive means for rotating said holding means about a generally vertical axis, :said drive means including a drive plate, ring gear means connected with said drive plate, frame means, mounting means supporting drive plate and ring gear means on said frame means for rotation about a vertical axis, drive gear means meshingly engaging said ring gear means, motor means for rotating said drive gear means so as to cause rotation of said drive plate about a vertical axis, clamping means adapted to releasably secure said top plate means of said means in clutching engagement with said drive plate, said clamping means being carried by and movable with said drive plate, and clamp releasing means carried by said frame means and adapted to engage said clamping means; fluid discharging means adapted to remain stationary while entering the open end of an article which is being lowered and direct fluid jets against material to be removed from said argcle, said fluid discharg ing means including first nozzle means adapted to `direct fluid jets generally outwardly and downwardly,

second nozzle means adapted to direct fluid jets generally outwardly and upwardly, and Valve means =for selectively controlling fluid ow through said first and second nozzle means; and removed material receiving means including cylindrical housing means encircling and radially spaced from at least the upper portion of said iluid discharging means, removed material conduit means extending from said housing, and ltering means includ-ing alternately operable, first and second lter sections, and flow diverting means for selectively directing flow from said removed material conduit means through said rst or said second lter sections.

References Cited hy the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,740,052 12/ 1929 Watson 134-110 2,260,518 10/1941 Hamilton et al. 134-110 2,710,819 6/1955 Weber et al. 134-23 3,009,839 11/1961 Phillips 134-23 FOREIGN PATENTS 545,300 3/1956 Belgium. 724,084 2/ 1955 Great Britain.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner. ROBERT L. BLEUTGE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1740052 *Aug 20, 1926Dec 17, 1929Allis Chalmers Mfg CoHydraulic casting-washing apparatus
US2260518 *Jan 24, 1938Oct 28, 1941John H HamiltonWashing machine
US2710819 *Dec 16, 1949Jun 14, 1955Armour & CoArticle washing method
US3009839 *Feb 8, 1960Nov 21, 1961Coleman CoTank spraying method
BE545300A * Title not available
GB724084A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4039350 *Mar 4, 1976Aug 2, 1977Sioux Steam Cleaner CorporationIndustrial cleaning system
US4496519 *Mar 9, 1981Jan 29, 1985Mcguire Paul JNuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/110, 134/152, 134/161, 134/156, 134/166.00R, 134/141, 134/160
International ClassificationF42B33/06, F02K9/00, F02K9/24, F42B33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02K9/24, F42B33/062
European ClassificationF42B33/06B, F02K9/24