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Publication numberUS3270997 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1966
Filing dateMar 19, 1964
Priority dateMar 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3270997 A, US 3270997A, US-A-3270997, US3270997 A, US3270997A
InventorsGethmann Kenneth W
Original AssigneeGethmann Kenneth W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scaffold device
US 3270997 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

K. W. GETHMANN SGAFFOLD DEVICE Sept. 6, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet Filed March 19, 1964 5 p v x w 4 P M ,m Nr 7 M Q my K5 Sept. 6, 1966 K. w. GETHMANN SCAFFOLD DEVICE 2 Sheetsiheet 2 Filed March 19, 1964 I 9'- i A hwavroe KENNETH MGE/"H/V/Q/V/V ,QTTOP/VEVS United States Patent 3,270,997 SCAFFOLD DEVICE Kenneth W. Gethmann, Gladbrook, Iowa Filed Mar. 19, 1964, Ser. No. 353,192 6 Claims. (Cl. 248-235) Scaifolds per -se are well known in the building industry. The major problem associated with present scaffolds is that there is no convenient walk means thereon for construction purposes. Additionally, there is no convenient means for storing materials such as blocks, bricks, mortar, etc., prior to their usage.

Satfolds are usually stacked in tiers, sometimes to great heights. A danger exists with this arrangement in that a workman may possibly fall from the structure.

The building industry has become a year around project as of late. A problem which does exist with this winter work is in Winterizing the scaffolds or enclosing the working area.

Scaifolds are quite frequently used to shore a ceiling or the like which is under construction. The ceiling or ceiling forms will usually be shored by placing beams on the upper portion of the scaffold underneath the structure to be supported. A difliculty is encountered in so doing due to the fact that the individual scaffold members are 6 to 8 feet high and no intermediate shoring means are available. This means that the structure can only be shored at the levels corresponding to the upper portion of each scaffold member.

Therefore, a principal object of this invention is to provide a scafiold device which has associated therewith an adjustable convenient walk means.

A further object of this invention is to provide a scaffold device which has associated therewith an adjustable, convenient material supply support means.

A further object of this invention is to provide a scaffold device which prevents workmen from falling from the scaffold.

A further object of this invention is to provide a scaffold device which permits convenient enclosure of the scaffold structure. 7

A further object of this invention is to provide a scaffold device which permits an overhead structure or the like to be shored regardless of variations in the height of the structure.

Still further objects of this invention are to provide a scaffold device that is economical in manufacture, durable in use, and refined in appearance.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

This invention consists in the construction, arrangements, and combination, of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, specifically pointed out in the claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the assembled device;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the material support bracket portion of the device;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of the guard post portion of the device;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the purlin bracket portion of the device;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the walk support bracket portion of the device;

FIGURE 6 is an end elevational view of a scaffold device having shoring means associated therewith;

FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view of a scaffold device having shoring means associated therewith;

FIGURE 8 is side elevational view illustrating the means of installing the shoring bracket on a scaffold device with a portion thereof cut away;

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FIGURE 9 is a side view of a scaffold device having extension frames mounted thereon; and

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view of the purlin bracket portion of the device.

The numeral 10 .generally designates a scaffold having opposite upright ends 11 and 11 and detachable cross braces 15 extending therebetween. Upright end 11 is comprised of vertical legs 17 and 19 having a cross brace 21 extending horizontally therebetween at' their upper portions. Upright ends 11 and 11' will not be separately describe-d as they are identical. The component parts of 11 which are identical to 11 will be indicated by A brace 23 extends vertically downwardly from brace 21 and has a plurality of braces 25 extending horizontally therefrom to leg 17. A brace 27 extends vertically downwardly from brace 21 and has a plurality of braces 29 extending horizontally therefrom to leg 19. Brace 31 extends horizontally between the upper portions of braces 23 and 27. Legs 17 and 19 have a plurality of pipe stubs 33 and 35 respectively secured thereto which extend inwardly therefrom parallel to brace 21. The uppermost stubs 33 and 35 are positioned above the uppermost horizontal braces 25 and 29, respectively, and the lowermost stubs 33 and 35 and positioned below the lowermost braces 25 and 29, respectively. Legs 17 and 19 have a plurality of brackets 37 secured thereto for receiving a cross brace 15.

Legs 19 and 19' each have detachably secured thereto a walk support bracket 39. Walk support bracket 39 is comprised of normally horizontal. elongated angle member 41 having a vertical. tubular member 43 secured at one of its ends. A brace 45 is secured to and extends downwardly from angle member 41 at substantially a right angle. Diagonal brace 47 extends from the lower end of brace 45 to tubular member 43. An arcuate'sleeve segment 49 is secured to angle member 41 adjacent the free end thereof and extends transversely outwardly and downwardly therefrom. An arcuate sleeve segment 51 is secured to brace 45 as illustrated in FIGURE 5 intermediate its length and is adapted to partially embra'celeg 19' at times. A U-shaped sleeve segment 53 is secured to brace 45 adjacent its lower end and is adapted to partially embrace leg 19 at times. Sleeve members 51 and 53 are in vertical alignment and are perpendicularly disposed to the axes of sleeve segment 49. Angle member 41 has an arcuate cut-away portion 55 adjacent sleeve member 49 adapted to receive leg 19 at times. A shorter angle member 57 is secured to angle member 41 by welding or the like as illustrated in FIGURE 5.

Upright ends 11 and 11' each have secured thereto a material support bracket 59. Bracket 59 is comprised of an elongated angle member 61 having an upstanding flange 63 secured to one of its ends. Arcuate sleeve segment 65 is secured to the upper portion of angle member 61 intermediate its length and at one side thereof. An arcuate sleeve segment 67 is secured to the other end of angle member 61 at one side thereof with its axis being perpendicular to that of segment 65. Sleeve segment 65 is adapted to partially embrace brace 27 as illustrated in FIGURE 1 while sleeve member 67 is adapted to partially embrace the *bottom surface of one of braces 29.

An elongated cylindrical member 69 having a collar 71 secured thereto intermediate its length by means of pin 73 can be slidably inserted into the open upper ends of legs 17 and 17'. Collar 71 limits the downward movement of cylindrical member 69 by engaging the upper end of legs 17 or 17.

A guard post- 73 having a sleeve member 75 and clamp 77 secured thereto adjacent its lower end can be secured to the upper end of legs 17 and 17' as illustrated in FIG- URE 1. Post 73 is mounted on member 69 as will be described hereafter. Clamp 77 is comprised of a U- shaped sleeve member 79 which has a pin 81 secured to one of its free ends and a latch 83 hingedly secured at its other end. Latch 83 has a notch 84 formed therein adapted to engage pin 81 at times. Sleeve member 75 slidably embraces the exposed end of cylindrical member 69 while clamp 77 embraces the upper portion of leg 17.

Guard post 73 has a bracket 37 mounted thereon adjacent its upper end. FIGURE 1 illustrates a guard post 73 in leg 17 and leg 17' with a guard rail 85 extending therebetween and secured to bracket 37 at its ends.

Legs 17 and 17 have secured thereto a plurality of purlin brackets 87 for supporting elongated wooden members 88, which in turn have a sheet of plastic or other suitable material mounted thereon for enclosing the scaffold structure. Purlin bracket 87 is comprised of an angle member 89 and a continuous rod 91 secured thereto. Rod 91 has its upper end terminating in a vertically extending arcuate hook element 93. Rod 91 extends downwardly from hook element 93 in a vertical portion 95 which is welded to edge 97 of angle 89. Rod 91 then extends at right angles from the lower end of vertical portion 95 across the bottom end 99 of angle 89 and is secured thereto by welding. An L-shaped bracket 101 is then formed by extending rod 91 beyond face 103 of angle 89, thence bending the rod upwardly and thence back upon itself at point 105, thence back along the bottom edge 99 of the angle to its midpoint. Rod 91 then terminates in a second arcuate hook element 107 which extends laterally outwardly from edge 99 and has its longitudinal axis perpendicularly disposed with. respect to hook element 93. Angle member 89 is provided with a hole 109 in face 103 to receive a securing means for elongated wooden member 88.

The numeral 113 represents a substantially U-shaped frame extension having a horizontal tubular member 115 with vertical tubular members 117 and 119 secured at its ends. Vertical tubular member 117 is adapted to slidably embrace cylindrical member 69 of FIGURE 8 as shown in FIGURES 8 and 9. A tie brace 121 has a horizontal tubular portion 123 and vertical tubular members 125 and 127 secured at its ends. Vertical tubular member 125 and 127 is adapted to slidably embrace vertical tubular members 117 and 119, respectively, of tie brace 113.

Frame extension 113A (FIGURE 9) is similar to frame extension 113 except that its corresponding parts 115A, 117A and 119A form the shape of an H rather than the shape of a U as was the case for frame extension 113. In practice, frame extension 113 is usually one foot in height and frame extension 113A is usually two feet in height.

A shoring bracket 128 can be detachably secured to the upper end of cylindrical member 69 as illustrated in FIG- URES 6 and 7. Shoring bracket 128 is comprised of a tubular member 129 having an L-shaped member 131 secured thereto at its upper end. L-shaped member 131 is provided with holes 133 and is adapted to receive a wooden beam or joist.

The normal method of operation of the scaffold of this invention is as follows. Upright ends 11 and 11 are set up as illustrated in FIGURE 1 with cross-brace 15 maintaining the same in upright position. A walk sup port bracket 39 is mounted on upright end 11 by simply placing arcuate sleeve segment 49 on the upper portion of one of braces 29 while maintaining vertical tubular member 43 in a somewhat elevated position. The outer end of walk support bracket 39 is then lowered thereby bringing sleeve segments 51 and 53 into engagement with leg 19. Cut-away area 55 will embrace a portion of leg 19. The precise arrangement of the sleeve segments prevent any movement of bracket 39.' Sleeve segment 49 being in engagement with brace 29 prevents horizontal movement of bracket 39 in one direction. Sleeve segment 51 prevents horizontal movement of bracket 39 in the opposite direction. Sleeve segment 53 prevents accidental pivotal movement of bracket 39 by partially embracing leg 19. Therefore, the only method by which bracket 39 may be removed from upright end 11 or moved in any direction is to pivot the outer end upwardly, thence rotating the bracket in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIGURE 1. Such arrangement of the sleeve segments provides the bracket with an extremely important safety feature. Another bracket 39 is mounted on leg 19' in a similar manner, and planks 111 extended therebetween. Planks 111 thereby provide a convenient walk for bricklayers, etc. Brackets 39 may be raised as the building progresses by simply moving the bracket up to a higher brace 29. It should be noted that sleeve segment 49 can be mounted on pipe stubs 35 when it is desired to mount the bracket 39 at intermediate elevations.

A material support bracket 59 is also mounted on upright ends 11 and 11'. Bracket 59 is simply placed in position so that sleeve 65 engages brace 27 and sleeve segment 67 engages the lower surface of brace 29 as illustrated in FIGURE 1. Planks 111 may then be extended between brackets 59 thereby providing a convenient material supply area for bricks, blocks, mortar, etc. Brackets 59 may also be raised or lowered if so desired.

Guard posts 73 and rail are a safety means to prevent workmen from falling from the scaffold when the top thereof is used as a walkway. Guard post 73 is quickly installed by simply placing sleeve member 75 over cylindrical member 69 in the manner described above, and placing clamp 77 around the upper portion of leg 17.

Purlin brackets 87 are installed on scaffold 10 by simply placing arcuate hook element on a pipe stub 33 or 35, or on a horizontal brace 25 or 27. Arcuate hook element 107 is placed in engagement with leg 17. Elongated wooden members 88 are then inserted in bracket 87 within the L-shaped bracket 101. Wooden members 88 can then be nailed or screwed in place by utilizing holes 109 in face 103 of angle 89. A sheet of plastic 112 or the like may be secured to wooden members 88 to enclose the scaffolding structure during inclement weather.

Frame extensions 113 and tie braces 121 may be mounted on the top of scaffold 10 in the manner described to vary the height of the scaffold without adding a complete scaffolding unit. This feature permits the scaffolding to be easily constructed to varying heights and adds great versatility to the scaffold as a whole.

If the top of the scaffold is to be used for shoring purposes (FIGURES 6, 7 and 8) instead'of as a walkway (FIGURE 1), the shoring brackets 128 are mounted on elements 69 in the manner described above. The height of the scaffold may be adjusted by using various combinations of frames 11, 113 and 113A as previously indicated; A supporting beam or joist is received within the L-shaped members 131 on pairs of brackets 128, and holes 133 can receive spikes or the like to effect the temporary connection between the joist and the brackets 128.

Thus, from the foregoing it is seen that the device of this invention provides a completely versatile scaffolding unit and otherwise accomplishes all of its stated objectives.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of my Scaffold Device without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my invention to cover by my claims, any modified forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included within their scope.

I claim:

1. In a material support bracket,

an elongated horizontal member,

a plank retaining means extending upwardly from one end of said horizontal member,

a first sleeve segment secured to one side of said horizontal member adjacent to its other end,

and a second sleeve segment secured to said horizontal member at one side thereof intermediate its length said first sleeve segment being arcuate about a horizontal axis and being open at its upper portion to receive a horizontal tubular member,

said second sleeve segment being arcuate about a vertical axis and having an open portion which opens in a direction towards said plank retaining means to receive a vertical tubular member.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein said first sleeve segment is secured to the lower side of said elongated member, and the second sleeve segment is secured to the upper side of said elongated member.

3. In a walk support bracket,

an elongated horizontal member,

a vertical arm member secured to said horizontal member intermediate its length and extending downwardly therefrom,

a diagonal arm member secured at one of its ends to said vertical arm member and secured at its other end to said horizontal member,

a first arcuate sleeve segment secured to said horizontal member adjacent one of its ends, said elongated horizontal member having a notched cut-away area formed therein adjacent said first arcuate sleeve segment,

and a second arcuate sleeve segment secured to said vertical arm member adjacent its lower end,

the axis of said first arcuate sleeve segment being perpendicular to that of said second arcuate sleeve segment.

4. In a purlin bracket,

a vertically disposed angle member, said angle member being comprised of a vertically disposed first member having opposite vertical side edges and a vertically disposed second member extending from one of the side edges of said first member transversely to said first member,

an L-shaped member secured to the lower end of said angle member,

a vertically extending hook element secured to the upper end of said angle member,

and a horizontally extending hook element secured to the lower end of said angle member.

5. In a purlin bracket,

a vertically disposed angle member,

a rod secured to said angle member,

said rod comprising a vertical portion secured to one edge of said angle member; and a horizontal portion connected to the lower end of said vertical portion and secured to the lower end of said angle member,

said vertical portion terminating in an upwardly extending vertical hook element,

said horizontal portion terminating in an L-shaped member positioned at one side of said angle member and then being formed into a laterally extending horizontal hook element.

6. In a walk support bracket,

an elongated, horizontal member,

a vertical arm member secured to said horizontal member intermediate its length and extending downwardly therefrom,

a diagonal arm member secured at one of its ends to said vertical arm member and secured at its other end to said horizontal member,

a first arcuate sleeve segment secured to said horizontal member adjacent one of its ends,

said elongated horizontal member having a semicircular cut-away area formed therein adjacent said first arcuate sleeve segment,

a second arcuate sleeve segment secured to said vertical arm member adjacent its lower end,

and a third arcuate sleeve segment secured to said vertical arm member intermediate its length,

the axis of said first arcuate sleeve segment being perpendicular to that of said second and third arcuate sleeve segments,

said cut-away area and said second and third arcuate sleeve segments being vertically aligned.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 978,550 12/1910 Boyd 248-211 2,125,830 8/1938 Uecker 248-235 2,605,074 7/ 1952 Bucsko 248-235 2,674,429 4/ 1954 Webster 248-235 2,686,032 8/ 1954 Thorson 248-211 2,897,013 7/1959 Delp 182-179 3,028,928 4/1962 Juculano 182-178 3,084,761 4/ 1963 Robertson 182-178 3,115,960 12/ 1963 Ott 248-211 X HARRISON R. MOSELEY, Primary Examiner.

R. P. MACHADO, Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3382949 *Mar 20, 1967May 14, 1968Le Materiel D Entpr Et De TravSafety railing for tubular scaffolding
US3385400 *Oct 5, 1966May 28, 1968Gilbert E. WhitsettScaffold bracket
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Classifications
U.S. Classification248/235, 182/82, 182/113
International ClassificationE04G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04G1/00
European ClassificationE04G1/00