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Publication numberUS3271781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1966
Filing dateApr 15, 1965
Priority dateApr 15, 1965
Publication numberUS 3271781 A, US 3271781A, US-A-3271781, US3271781 A, US3271781A
InventorsPeck Albert B, Sheldon Sontag
Original AssigneePeck Mfg Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cap construction
US 3271781 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 13, 1966 s. SONTAG E'QI'AL CAP CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 15, 1965 6 TNE N OP S v 5 NM OT DR LE EB HL A ATTORNEY Sept. 13, 1966 s. SONTAG ETAL 3, 1,78

' CAP CONSTRUCTION Filed April 15, 1965 2 Sheets-$heet 2 INVENTORS SHELDON SONTAG ALBERT B. PECK WVQM ATTORNEY United States Patent CAP CONSTRUCTION Sheldon Sontag, Brooklyn, and Albert E. Peck, Tarrytown, N.Y., assignors to Peck Manufacturing Comany, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New Filed Apr. 15, 1965, Ser. No. 448,293

13 Claims. (Cl. 2-202) This invention relates generally to a cap or head covering which is convertible to form a hooded cap covering the wearers neck and ears and also to provide varying degrees of protection of the wearers face.

An object of the present invention is to provide a head covering which is selectively convertible for use as a cap alone, for example, a so-called hockey cap, or as a hooded cap or a cap with a face mask.

Another object is to provide a convertible cap or head covering of the described character which can be conveniently and relatively inexpensively formed of a knitted or other stretchable, conforming fabric.

A further object is to provide a convertible cap or head covering of the described character having a unique and attractive appearance.

In accordance with an aspect of this invention, a convertible fabric head covering comprises three panel members joined in superposed relation to constitute two outer panel members forming a generally tubular body which opens at one end and an intermediate panel member which is selectively disposable in abutting relation against either of the outer panel members, one of the outer panel members raving a relatively large opening therein to expose at least a substantial portion of the wearers face when the wearers head is disposed between that one outer panel member and the intermediate panel member, and another of the panel members having at least one aperture therein which is small relative to the size of said opening and adapted to expose only a corresponding limited area of the wearers face, when the wearers head is disposed between the intermediate panel member and the other of the outer panel members.

In one embodiment of the invention, the intermediate panel member has one or more relatively small discrete apertures for exposing only limited areas of the wearers face, for example, the wearers eyes, eyes and mouth, or eyes, nostrils and mouth, and such apertures are located to come within the face opening when such apertured intermediate panel member is disposed against the outer panel member having the face opening therein.

In another embodiment of the invention, the outer panel member opposed to that having the face opening is formed with the one or more relatively small apertures for selectively exposing the wearers eyes, eyes and mouth, or eyes, nostrils and mouth, so that each such aperture is effectively closed by the intermediate panel member when the latter is disposed against the outer panel member having such aperture or apertures therein.

Further, in the convertible head covering embodying the invention, the intermediate and outer panel members below the cap portion, which latter may be defined by upper parts of said panel members or by a separately formed fabric body, are foldable upwardly onto the cap portion to form a cuff on the cap portion, for example, to constitute a so-called hockey cap.

One of the panel members, for example, the outer panel member having a face opening therein, may be formed of two fabric layers, while each of the other panel members is constituted by a single fabric layer so that, when the several panel members are folded upwardly to form a cuif on the cap portion, the cuff has equal thicknesses of fabric at the front and back parts thereof. Further, when one of the three panel members is formed of two fabric layers, the head covering may be advantageously produced from a knitted tube which is everted or folded on itself to provide the necessary four fabric layers.

The above, and other objects, features and advantages of the invention, will be apparent in the following detailed description of illustrative embodiments thereof which is to be read in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a convertible head covering in accordance with one embodiment and which is shown conditioned to provide a cap portion with a hood depending therefrom;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to that of FIG. 1, but showing the head covering conditioned to provide a face mask exposing only the wearers eyes and mouth;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view of the head covering structure of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a knitted tube which is flattened and cut to permit the forming of the head covering of FIGS. 1-3 therefrom;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a flat fabric blank from which the head covering of FIGS. 1-3 may also be formed;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the head covering converted into a cap;

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view of the head covering when converted into a cap;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view similar to that of FIG. 3, but showing the construction of a head covering in accordance with another embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 9 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 99 on FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a flat fabric blank from which a head covering of the type shown on FIGS. 8 and 9 can be produced;

FIG. 11 is another sectional view similar to that of FIG. 3, but showing a further modification of the head covering in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the head covering of FIG. 11 shown conditioned to provide a hooded cap; and

FIG. 13 is another perspective view of the head covering of FIG. 11, but shown converted to a hooded cap with face mask.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 in detail, it will be seen that a convertible head covering embodying this invention and there generally identified by the reference numeral 10 comprises three panel members 11, 12 and 13, preferably of knitted or other stretchable, conforming fabric. As shown particularly on FIG. 3, one of the panel members, for example, the panel member 11 may be constituted by two fabric layers 11' and 11", whereas the other two panel members 12 and 13 are each formed of a single fabric layer.

The panel members 11, 12 and 13 are joined in superposed relation, either by being formed integrally or by suitable seams at the sides of the head covering, as hereinafter described in detail, so that the outer panel members 11 and 13 form a generally tubular outer body which is closed at its upper end to define a cap portion 14. The third or intermediate panel member 12 extends between outer panel members 11 and 13 and is adapted to lie in abutting, facing relation against either panel member 11 or panel member 13.

Further, in accordance with the invention, one of the outer panel members, specifically the outer panel member 11 in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 4, is formed with a single opening 17 in both layers 11 and 11", which opening is located below the cap portion 14 and is of sufiicient size so that it may be at least stretched to expose a substantial portion, if not the entire face of the wearer. One of the other panel members 12 and 13,

specifically the intermediate layer or panel 12 in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 4, is formed with one or more discrete spaced apertures 18 and 19 each being relatively small and located to come within the face opening 17 when panel member 12 is disposed against panel member 11. Each of the apertures is intended to selectively expose only limited areas of the wearers face, for example, the wearers eyes and mouth, or eyes, nose and mouth.

When it is desired to convert head covering into a hooded cap, intermediate panel member 12 is disposed against outer panel member 13 and the wearers head is inserted between panel members 11 and 12 so as to be in facing abutting relation to the panel member 11. The wearers face is then exposed at opening 17, as shown on FIG. 1, while the wearers head, ears, neck and lower jaw and chin are fully protected from the cold.

If it is desired to provide further protection for the face by converting the head covering 10 into a hooded cap with face mask, as shown on FIG. 2, the intermediate panel member 12 is disposed against panel member 11 and the wearers head is inserted between panel members 12 and 13- with the panel member 12 being in overlying abutting relation to the wearers face. The wearers face is then protected fully by the portion of panel member 12 appearing within opening 17 and the wearers eyes and mouth or other limited areas of the face are exposed through the relatively small apertures 18 and 19. Thus, the conversion of the head covering 10 into a hooded cap, similar in appearance to the mailed hoods worn by the crusaders, or into a hooded cap with a face mask, is effected merely by selectively disposing the intermediate panel member 12 either against the panel member 13 or the panel member 11, respectively.

In relatively mild weather, the lower portions of panel members 11, 12 and 13 are folded upwardly onto cap portion 14 to form a cuff (FIG. 6) within which the opening 17 and apertures 18 and 19 are hidden, as shown on FIG. 7.

Where the panel member 11 has two fabric layers and the panel members 12 and 13 are each constituted by a single fabric layer, panel member 12 is disposed against panel member 13 prior to the upward folding thereof so that the cuff 20 will have equal thicknesses of fabric in all of its parts.

The forming of the head covering with two fabric layers in one of its panel members is further advantageous in that it permits the economical production of the head covering from tubular knitted fabric. For example, as shown on FIG. 4, the head covering 10 may be conveniently produced from a knitted tube 21 having a length that is approximately twice the desired height of the head covering 10. The tube 21, when flattened as shown, provides an underlying fabric layer 21a and an overlying fabric layer 21b joined together along the opposite longitudinal edges of the flattened tube. One layer 21b of the flattened tube is formed with identical openings 17' and 17" which are equidistant from the intended fold line 22 located near the middle of the tube, and the other layer 21a of the flattened tube is formed with one or more apertures 18 and 19' located within the opening 17". Thus, when one end portion of the tube 21, for example, the upper end portion as viewed on FIG. 4, is everted or folded outwardly over the lower end portion of the tube, the upper end portion of layer 21b, which is indicated at 11' comes in front of the lower end portion of layer 21b, which is indicated at 11", to form the two layers of panel member 11 with the openings 17' and 17 registering to form face opening 17, while the upper end portion of layer 21a, which is indicated at 13, comes in back of the lower end portion of layer 21a, which is indicated at 12', to form the panel members 13 and 12, respectively. Thereafter, the upper end portion of the folded tube is closed or gathered together, for example, by stitching as indicated at 15 on FIGS. 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7.

As will be apparent to those skilled in this art, the

4. herein described head coverings incorporating the principles of this invention can be formed in many other ways including the folding of selectively formed flat blanks.

FIG. 5 illustrates, by way of example, one method of producing a head covering 10 from a flat blank 121 of knitted or other stretchable, conforming fabric, which blank is generally rectangular and includes four areas 11', 11", 12 and 13' defined by the edges of the blank and intersecting medial lines 122 and 123. The areas 11' and 11 have openings 17 and 17" therein, and the area 12 has one or more apertures 18 and 19', as shown. When the blank 121 is folded about the medial line 122, and then about the medial line 123, the area 11" comes in back of the area 11' to form, with the latter, the panel member 11, and the area 12' comes between the area 13' and the area 11". Thus, area 12' forms intermediate panel member 12 and area 13' forms outer panel member 13. The fold about the medial line 123 of the blank serves to join the panel members 11, 12 and 13, at one side of the head covering, and the panel members are sewed or seamed together at the opposite side of the head covering and also at the top.

Whether the head covering 10 is produced from the knit tube 21 of FIG. 4 or the flat blank 1 21 of FIG. 5, it is finished with binding or finishing stitches around the opening 17 and along the lower edge of panel member 11 to join together the layers 11' and 11' thereof, and also around the apertures 18 and 19 and along the separate lower edges of panel members 12 and 13.

Referring now to F168. 8 and 9, it will be seen that a head covering 210 in accordance with another embodiment of this invention comprises three panel members 211, 212 and 213, each consisting of a single layer of knitted or other stretchable, conforming fabric. The

panel members 211 and 213 which constitute the outer panel members, are substantially coextensive and form a generally tubular outer body which is closed at its upper end to define a cap portion 214. The third or intermediate panel member 212 extends between the outer panel members 211 and 213, at least below the cap portion 214 and may be coextensive with panel members 211 and 213, as shown. intermediate panel member 212 is joined to the outer body formed by panel members 211 and 213, for example, at the opposite sides of the body and is adapted to lie in abutting facing relation against either panel member 211 or panel member 213.

The layers constituting panel members 211, 212 and 213 may all be cut or otherwise separately formed of knitted or other stretchable, conforming fabric, and stitched together at side seams 215 and 216 (FIG. 9). Alternatively, any two of the panel members 211, 2-12 and 21 3 may be knitted integrally on a conventional tubular knitting machine producing a knitted tube which, when flattened, defines the two panel members in question, and thereafter the third panel member is stitched or otherwise secured to the integrally knitted layers or panel members at least along the opposite sides of the latter; Finally, the upper end of the body formed by the outer panel members is closed by stitching or other suitable means.

The head covering 210 of vFIGS. 8 and 9 may also be formed from a one-piece flat blank 221 (FIG. 10) which is generally rectangular, as shown, and made up of contiguous areas 211, 212' and 213 with parallel fold lines 222 and 223 therebetween. The areas 211' and 212' are respectively formed with opening 17' and with one or more apertures, as at 218' and 219. The area 212' is folded back around fold line 222 to lie in back of area (2111' and area 213 is then folded to lie in back of area 212. Thus, the areas 211', 212' and 213' of the folded blank form the panel members 211, 212 and 213 of head covering 210, with the free edge of panel 211 being secured to the fold 223 between panels 212 and 213, as by the seam 2 1-5 (FIG. 9), and with the free edge of panel 213 being secured to the fold 222, as by the seam 216. The head covering 210 formed from the blank 22 1 is further closed at the top, as by stitching or other suitable means.

It will be apparent that the head covering 210 of FIGS. 8 and 9, may be worn with the wearers head disposed between panel members 2 11 and 212 to expose the wearers face at opening 217, or with the wearers head between panel members 2 12 and 213 so that the wearers face is protected fully by the portion of panel member 212 coming within opening 217 and only limited areas of the wearers face, for example, the eyes and month, are exposed at apertures 218 and 219.

Referring now to FIGS. ll, 12 and 13, it will be seen that the head covering 210a there illustrated is generally similar to the previously described head covering 210 and has its several parts identified by the same reference numerals as the corresponding parts of the latter, but with the letter a appended thereto. However, in the head covering 210a, the apertures 218a and 219a for exposing limited areas of the wearers face, for example, the eyes and mouth, are formed in the outer panel member or layer 213a and the intermediate panel member layer 21 2a is solid.

When it is desired to wear the head covering 210a as a hooded cap (FIG. 12), the intermediate panel member 212a is disposed against outer panel member 2113a and the wearers head is inserted between panel members 211a and 212a with panel member 211a facing forwardly. Thus, the wearers face is exposed at opening 217a of panel member 21111 while the apertures 21 8a and 219a in panel member 213a, which is at the back of the head, are closed by the intermediate panel member 212a.

When it is desired to wear head covering 210a as a hooded cap with face mask (FIG. 13), panel member 212a is disposed against panel member 21111 to close opening 2 17a, and the wearers head is inserted between panel member 2112a and panel member 21341 with the latter at the front to expose the wearers eyes and mouth at apertures 218a and 219a.

If it is desired to accentuate the presence of either the opening 217a or the apertures 218a and 219a at the back of the head covering when the latter is converted for use as in FIG. 12 or FIG. 13, respectively, such opening and apertures may be bound or edged with a contrasting color, or the color of panel member 212a may be made to contrast with the color of panel members 211a and 2134:. However, if it is desired to make the opening 217a or apertures 2118a and 219a less obvious when disposed at the back of the head covering 210a, the panel members 211a, 212a and 213a may all be of the same color which is matched by the binding or edging extending around opening 2 17a and apertures 218a and 219a.

As in the previously described head coverings, the lower portions of panel members 211a, 212a and 213a may be folded upwardly onto cap portion 214a to form a cuff around the latter.

If desired, the knitted tube 21 of FIG. 4 can also be employed for producing a head covering of the type shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, that is, one in which the face opening and the relatively small aperture or apertures appear in the outer panel members and the intermediate panel member is solid. In that case, the upper portion of tube 21 is everted inwardly to lie within the lower portion of the tube so that the upper and lower portions 11 and 11" of layer 21b form the outer panel member with opening 217a therein, the lower portion 12' of layer 21a forms the outer panel member with apertures 218a and 21911 therein, and the upper portion of layer 210 forms the intermediate panel member which is solid.

Although the several embodiments described above have all had a cap portion 14, 214 or 214a formed as an integral part of the panel members which selectively provide the hood, mask or folded cufi, such cap portion may be formed separately from the panel members, either of the same or of a different fabric. Further, if desired, a visor (not shown) of knitted fabric or other material may be attached to the outer panel member having the face opening 17, 217 or 217a therein.

It is apparent from the above that head coverings embodying this invention are easily and quickly convertible to provide varying degrees of protection from the cold, and are of unique and attractive appearance.

Although illustrative embodiments of the invention and modifications thereof have been described in detail herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, the invention is not limited to those precise embodiments and modifications and various changes and other modifications may be made therein by one skilled in the art Without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention, except as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A convertible head covering comprising first and second superposed panel members forming a tubular body portion, a third panel member disposed intermediate said first and second panel members and selectively disposable in abutting facing relationship with either of said first and second panel members, said first panel member having a relatively large face opening therein for exposing a substantial portion of the wearers face when disposed in overlying abutting facing relation therewith and one of said remaining panel members having at least one aperture which is small in relation to said face opening in said first panel member for effecting selective and limited exposure of at least one facial element when said last mentioned panel member is disposed in overlying abutting facing relation with the wearers face.

2. A convertible fabric head covering comprising three fabric panel members joined in superposed relation to constitute two outer panel members forming a generally tubular body which is open at one end and an intermediate panel member which is selectively disposable against either of said outer panel members, one of said outer panel members having an opening therein to expose a substantial portion of the wearers face when the wearers head is disposed between said one outer panel member and said intermediate panel member, and another of said panel members having at least one aperture therein which is small relative to the size of said opening of said one outer panel, each said aperture being adapted to expose only a corresponding limited area of the wearers face when the wearers head is disposed between said intermediate panel member and the other of said outer panel members.

3. A convertible fabric head covering as in claim 2; wherein one of said three panel members is constituted by two layers of fabric and each of the other two panel members is constituted by a single layer of fabric.

4. A convertible fabric head covering as in claim 3; wherein said panel member constituted by two layers of fabric is the outer panel member having said opening to expose a substantial portion of the wearers face.

5. A convertible fabric head covering as in claim 2; wherein each of said three panel members is constituted by a single fabric layer.

6. A convertible fabric head covering as in claim 2; wherein one of said outer panel members is constituted by inner and outer fabric layers and the other outer panel member and said intermediate panel member are each constituted by a single fabric layer; and

wherein the single fabric layer of said intermediate panel member and said inner layer of said one outer panel member are integral parts of an inner knitted tube portion, and the single fabric layer of said other outer panel member and said outer fabric layer of said one outer panel member are integral parts of an outer knitted tube portion which is integral with said inner knitted tube portion at one end of the latter.

7. A convertible fabric head covering as in claim 2;

wherein said pane-l member having at least one aperture therein is said other outer panel member and each said aperture is closed by said intermediate panel member when the latter is disposed against said other outer panel member.

8. A convertible fabric head covering as in claim 2; wherein said panel member having at least one aperture therein is said intermediate panel member, and each said aperture is located to come within said opening of said one outer panel member when said intermediate panel member is disposed against said one outer panel member.

9. A convertible head covering of stretchable, conforming fabric comprising an outer generally tubular body which is closed at the upper end and, when flattened, defines two substantially coextensive outer panel members, an intermediate panel member extending between said outer panel members and joined to said body at the opposite sides thereof, one of said outer panel members having a face opening there-in so that, when the wearers head is inserted between said one outer panel member and said intermediate panel member, the wearers face is substantially exposed at said opening and the head covering constitutes a hooded cap, and one of said intermediate and other outer panel members having at least one aperture therein to exposure only a corresponding area of the wearers face when the wearers head is disposed between said intermediate and other outer panel member, whereby the head covering then constitutes a cap with attached face mask.

10. A convertible head covering of stretchable, conforming fabric comprising an outer generally tubular body which is closed at the upper end to define a cap portion and, when flattened, defines two substantially coextensive outer panel members, an intermediate panel member extending between said outer panel members at lea-st below said cap portion of the body and being joined to the body at the opposite sides of the latter so as to be selectively disposable against each of said outer panel members, one of said outer panel members having a single relatively large opening therein below said cap portion to expose the wearers face when the wearers head is disposed between said one outer panel member and said intermediate panel member, and one of said intermediate and other outer panel members having at least one aperture therein which is small in relation to said opening to expose only a selected small area of the wearers face when the wearers head is disposed between said other outer panel member and said intermediate panel member, said outer and intermediate panel members below said cap portion being foldable upwardly onto the latter to form a cuff thereon.

11. A convertible head covering as in claim 10; wherein said panel member having at least one aperture therein is said other outer panel member and each said aperture is closed by said intermediate panel member when the latter is disposed against said other outer panel member.

12. A convertible head covering as in claim 10; wherein said panel member having at least one aperture therein is said intermediate panel member and each said aperture is located to come within said opening of said one outer panel member when said intermediate panel member is disposed against said one outer panel member.

13. A convertible head covering as in claim 10; wherein one of said outer panel members is constituted by two fabric layers and the other panel members are each constituted by a single fabric layer, said other panel members constituted by single fabric layers being folded together in forming said cuff so that equal thicknesses of fabric appear in the portions of the cuff defined by the panel member constituted by two fabric layers and by the two single layer panel members which are folded together.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,057,202 3/1913 Yudelson 2205 1,235,927 8/1917 Sanborn 2205 2,870,451 1/ 1959 Brodsky 2202 2,998,611 9/ 1961 Schuessler 2-202 JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

G. KRIZMANICH, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2998611 *Mar 23, 1960Sep 5, 1961Schuessler Knitting Mills IncCuffed cap and face hood and method of forming
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3373447 *Mar 10, 1966Mar 19, 1968Reliable Knitting WorksConvertible hat
US3531952 *Dec 24, 1968Oct 6, 1970Wigwam Mills IncKnit head cover and method of forming same
US3717882 *Apr 29, 1971Feb 27, 1973Schuessler WCap with adjustable face mask
US3740767 *Feb 17, 1971Jun 26, 1973Schuessler RKnitted headwear with wind barrier
US4272853 *Dec 31, 1979Jun 16, 1981Schuessler Walter ECold weather hood for safety hat
US4610247 *Sep 20, 1984Sep 9, 1986Arctic Temperature ControlsCold weather breathing apparatus
US4823406 *Aug 1, 1988Apr 25, 1989Paris Accessories, Inc.Method of manufacturing stocking cap and resultant article
US4941211 *Apr 14, 1989Jul 17, 1990Reliable Knitting WorksCold weather hood
US5123116 *Apr 16, 1991Jun 23, 1992Roth James MWrestling blinder
US5142704 *Apr 5, 1991Sep 1, 1992ChicopeeSurgical hood
US5551087 *May 23, 1995Sep 3, 1996Reliable Knitting WorksHat and face mask combination
US5809572 *Aug 1, 1996Sep 22, 1998Sisolak; Edward R.Multiple-layer, formed face mask for use in a cold weather hood
US5815849 *Apr 3, 1997Oct 6, 1998Maletich; GerardSunglass equipped facemask construction
US5845340 *May 16, 1997Dec 8, 1998Frislie; Larry P.Face and head garment
US6272690Mar 18, 1996Aug 14, 2001Michael J. CareyHead covering
US6397395Oct 6, 1999Jun 4, 2002Dehart Anthony G.Hooded garment with storable mask or goggles
US7188374Dec 6, 2002Mar 13, 2007Seirus Innovative Accessories, Inc.Hat with scarf
US7603724Dec 16, 2004Oct 20, 2009Under Armour, Inc.Hood with hinged mask piece
US7681251Mar 9, 2007Mar 23, 2010Seirus Innovative Accessories, Inc.Hat with scarf
US8109271 *Sep 7, 2006Feb 7, 2012Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcMethod and apparatus for securing a patient interface to a patient's face
US20040098789 *Dec 6, 2002May 27, 2004Carey Michael J.Hat with scarf
USD735974May 30, 2014Aug 11, 2015Reliable Knitting WorksGarment with surface ornamentation
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/202, 2/173, D02/880
International ClassificationA42B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA42B1/046
European ClassificationA42B1/04D