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Publication numberUS3272345 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1966
Filing dateJan 11, 1965
Priority dateJan 11, 1965
Publication numberUS 3272345 A, US 3272345A, US-A-3272345, US3272345 A, US3272345A
InventorsWallace John W
Original AssigneeBrad Mar Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cloth bolt holder and rack
US 3272345 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 13, 1966 J. w. WALLACE CLOTH BOLT HOLDER AND RACK 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 1]., 1965 IN l EN TOR -/aA 7 M J/4M3 H/S A TTORNE VS P 1966 J. w. WALLACE CLOTH BOLT-HOLDER AND RACK 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 11, 1965 INVENTOR Jab! WWW/4 By H/S A TTORNE V5 United States Patent 3,272,345 CLOTH BOLT HOLDER AND RACK John W. Wallace, Bradfordwoods, Pa., assignor to The Brad-Mar Corporation, Wexford, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Jan. 11, 1965, Ser. No. 424,776 15 Claims. '(Cl. 211-44) This invention relates to a display and utility rack and particularly, to a rack suitable for compactly and effectively displaying bolts of cloth material and for efficiently utilizing the bolts. A phase of my invention deals with a new and improved holder for supporting a cloth bolt in an upright position, for manipulating and tilting it, and for inserting and removing it.

My invention particularly deals with means for supporting, displaying and utilizing bolts of cloth material that are of somewhat flat of oblong shape. The cloth bolts are wound on a central mandrel of flattened or oblong shape which serves as a central core and may be of any suitable material, such as cardboard, wood, resin, etc.

The material of the bolts is customarily folded in half and wrapped around the mandrel. The cloth is supplied in various more or less standard widths of 18 inches, 24 inches, 30 inches and 36 inches, such that, as folded, it provides a bolt width of 9, 12, etc., inches. The Width becomes the height of the bolt when it is stored or displayed in an upright position. It will be appreciated that a bolt will have a considerable thickness when newly supplied and that it will be decreased in thickness as material is cut off and sold; this results in a variation in the space required for storing or displaying it.

A yard goods merchant finds it necessary to make the most efficient use of available space, in order that a desired full-line of materials will not only be available to the customer, but will also be attractively displayed for the customers inspection. This has to be done in such a manner as to permit movement between the racks, cleaning under the racks, a maximized elfective utilization of floor space and of head room representing the normal vision of a customer, and a minimized use of overhead room to provide suflicient light and to enable a clerk to look over the racks to see the customer. Generally speaking, the display should be such that a customer and clerk of average height can see over the top of the material display rack.

It has been an object of my invention to provide a new and improved form of display and utility rack that has modular flexibility, and that makes maximum utilization of available display space and in the most effective manner;

Another object has been to devise a display rack that is readily adaptable to different widths or heights of bolts as well as thicknesses of material thereon, and that will make possible the use of display shelves along sides as well as ends of the rack;

Another object has been to provide a display and utility rack for cloth bolts in which upper and lower tiers or layers of bolts may be in a closely adjacent or above and 'below relationship, and each bolt can be readily inserted and removed as well as inspected while being supported on the rack;

Another object of my invention has been to provide a new and improved form of display and utility rack for cloth bolts which will accomplish a stable retention of the bolt in an upright stored position there-on and, at the same time, will permit the bolt to be swung outwardly on an arc and suppored at an outwardly-inclined relationship for inspection and, when swung out, will permit the bolt to be easily removed and inserted on a holder;

A still further object of my invention has been to devise a new and improved form of bolt holder for a display and utility rack which is flexible in its utilization and which provides a two-position support of the bolt;

A still further object of my invention has been to devise bolt holders for rack shelves which will be slidable there-on to accommodate diiferent thicknesses of cloth bolts and which can be readily removed from and inserted on the shelf at any position therealong;

These and other objects of my invention will appear to those skilled in the art from the illustrated embodiments and the appended claims.

In the drawings,

FIGURE 1 is a front perspective view in elevation of a rack constructed in accordance with my invention and as utilizing holders also constructed in accordance with my invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmental end view in elevation and partial section of the rack of FIGURE 1, particularly illustrating details as to the construction and mounting of shelves and holders;

FIGURE 3 is a reduced somewhat diagrammatic end section in elevation, taken inside of one end frame of and illustrating a utilization of the rack of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmental end view in elevation and partial section on the scale of FIGURE 2, illustrating a wall-mounted application or employment of a construction of my invention;

FIGURE 5 is an end section in elevation on an intermediate scale between FIGURES 1 and 3, taken along the line V--V of FIGURE 6, and illustrating a triangular or A-frame utilization of my invention;

FIGURE 6 is a side view in elevation on the scale of and of the construction of FIGURE 5 with the shelves removed;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged somewhat diagrammatic view in elevation on the scale of FIGURE 2., illustrating the flexing of a bolt holder for mounting and dismounting it on bars or rails of a shelf; and

FIGURE 8 is a partially broken-away perspective view on the scale of FIGURE 7, illustrating how the holder of FIGURE 7 is inserted for positioning a bolt of cloth material.

In carrying out my invention, I make use of frame members in constructing a rack which may be readily shipped in a knocked-down compact package form and readily assembled to provide a strong and rigid support for a large number of cloth bolts. The frame members are provided with latching slots in a spaced relation along their vertical extent to detachably-receive outwardly-projecting bolt supporting shelves. Each shelf is provided with a suitable number of upwardly-projecting bolt holders which are detachably-mounted thereon for slid- :able movement longitudinally therealong. I preferably utilize a longitudinally-extending cross member on a rack of my construction to provide a back support or rest for a line of cloth bolts. The cross member is located in a spaced relation above and back of a particular shelf on which bolts are to be positioned in a vertically-upwardly extending relation thereon. This contributes to the stability of the bolts in their normally fully vertical upright positioning on a given shelf and on an associated holder.

Referring particularly to the rack embodiment 10 of FIGURE 1 of the drawings, it will be seen that I have provided two rectangular skeletonized frames 11, and a skeletonized-rectangular, cross-extending, central or mid-frame 13. Each end frame 11 has a pair of transversely-spaced-apart vertically-extending upright memhers 11a and 1112, an end connecting top bar or rail member 11c, and an upwardly-spaced lower connecting bar or rail member 11d. Members of the frames 11 are, like members of the frame 13 and members of shelf frames 15 and 15', shown of hollow rectangular or boxlike section to provide strength and rigidity with a minimization of weight, see particularly FIGURE 2.

Referring again to FIGURE 1, the central or midframe 13 is provided with longitudinally spaced-apart upwardly-extending or vertical upright members 13a and 131), a top end connecting bar or rail member 130, and a bottom end connecting bar or rail member 13a, as well as an intermediate connecting bar or rail member 13d. Like the end frames 11, the cross or central frame 13 is of integral construction as to its members, as by welding or brazing the members together into an integral structure, if the frames are of metal construction, If the members are of resin construction, they may be formed integrally or cemented together into an integral structure. Bottom portions of the end frames 11 serve as legs for the rack and may either receive rolling casters, such as 12 of FIGURE 1, or plug-fitting slides, such as 27 of FIGURES and 6.

In the construction of FIGURE 1, I have illustrated a display and utility rack that is suitable for carrying two tiers of cloth bolts along its opposed sides as well as along its ends. For simplicity of illustration, I have only shown end shelves at one end of the rack. Side shelves 15 are of unitary rectangular construction, as made-up of longitudinally-extending, spaced-apart parallel, front and back bar or rail members 15a and 15b, a central cross member 15c, and end-connecting or support members 16 of somewhat wing-like shape. As shown in FIGURE 3, the front and back members 15a and 15b lie on a common plane to support cloth bolts 18 in upright positions thereon. As shown particularly in FIG- URE 2, each 'Wing end member 16 has an upper latchpivot type of tongue or lug 16a and a pair of verticallyspaced straight type of tongues or lugs 16b that are adapted to fit within adjacent side slits or slots a that are vertically-spaced along mid frame vertical upright members 13a and 13b. It will thus be apparent that the shelves 15 may be easily inserted and removed at desired heights along the frame members. End shelves 15' are of the same construction as the side shelves 15, except that, due to their shorter lengths, they are not provided with cross brace members 15c. Their front and back bar or rail members 15'a and 15b are secured at their ends to wing or end connecting members 16. The members 16 have tongues or lugs corresponding to the lugs 16a and 16b of the members 16, and are adaped to removablyfit within adjacent horizontally-aligned slots b along the vertical extent of the vertical upright members 11a and 11b of the end frames 11.

As shown in FIGURE 1, when the rack 10 is shipped to a customer, it can be then easily assembled by inserting threaded bolts 14 through members 11d and 110 of the end frames 11 into threaded bore portions of vertical upright members 13a and 13b of the mid frame 13.

As illustrated in FIGURES l and 2, I have provided upright holders for supporting bolts of cloth material, such as 18 of FIGURE 8. Each holder 20 has a vertical front leg portion 20a connected at its upper end by a narrow loop portion 20b to a backwardly-downwardly-outwardly declining or forwardly-upwardly-inwardly-inclined back leg portion 20c. The leg portions of the holder 20 are preferably of flexible material, such as of metal or resin wire or rod construction, and are at least connected by a flexible portion 20b. Each holder 20 is provided with front and back slide mount or foot portions 20d and 20e that are shaped to fit on the bars 15a and 15b or 15'a and 15'b. The foot portions 20d and 20e are secured to lower ends of the legs 20a and 200, are of concave, channel-like or rectangular shape so as to slidably-fit in a complementary manner on or about three sides (top, front or back, and bottom) of associated shelf bar members 15a and 15a or 15b and 15'b. Each holder 20 is pre-stressed to normally flexibily-tension its leg portions, in order that the feet will normally be flexiblyclamped or retained in a frictionably-slidable position on 4 the shelf bar members. As shown in FIGURE 7, the tensioning may be such as to move the legs towards each other or to flexibily-resist spreading them apart or outwardly with respect to each other. It will be noted that the feet 20d and 20s have an open side, shown as an inwardly-open side in FIGURE 2, so that the holder 20 may be inserted on and removed from the bars 15a and 15b by manually flexing the leg portions 20a and 200, to spread them apart or outwardly against spring tension. As shown, the feet of each holder 20 have opposed inwardly-open sides.

As particularly illustrated in FIGURE 2, each holder 20, when viewed from the front has a fully forwardlyupwardly-sloped back leg 20c and a fully vertically-extending front leg 20a to define a triangular shape that represents a half of a rectangle, bisected by the leg 20c as a diagonal. It will be apparent that each holder 20 may be removed and inserted at any position along the length of a particular shelf 15 or 15 by merely expanding its legs 20a and 200 outwardly with respect to each other, and then releasing them to permit them to slidably-clamp on slide bars 15a and 15b or 15a and 15'b.

In FIGURE 3, I have illustrated a utilization of a rack structure, such as shown in FIGURE 1. The solid line position B shows a bolt of material 18 as tilted outwardly by a clerk or customer, and as supported in an outwardlyinclined relation on the back leg portion 20c for inspection. The solid line position A shows the bolts 18 in their normal upright supported positions, resting against back rail members and 13d, as compared to position B. The dot and dash line position C shows how a bolt 18 is endwise-removed from and inserted on a holder 20 from the tilted-out position B. FIGURE 7 shows the leg portions as spread-apart for mounting and removing the holder 20 which is greater than the distance between the front and back shelf bars 15a and 15b (see the dot and dash position of the leg portions 20a). It will be noted that the normal free closed-in relation of the leg portions is less in spacing than the distance between the front and back shelf bars, such that the legs are flexibly-tensioned towards each other in the full line position of FIGURE 7. Incidentally, referring to FIGURE 8, the holder 20 is inserted between the inside of the inner layer 18a of the cloth of the bolt and its mandrel 19.

The embodiments of FIGURES 4 and 5 show the adapt-ability of my invention. In FIGURE 4, the shelf 15 is mounted on a pair of longitudinally-spaced-apart forwardly-slotted vertical members 21 which are secured to the wall, as by bolts 22, and which have at least one cross connecting rail member 23 in a spaced relation above the shelf 15. In FIGURES 5 and 6, I have shown a triangular or substantially A-shaped rack 25 that employs hollow box-like, rectangular front and back frames 26 and 26' of similar construction whose parts have the same numbers, but with the parts of the back frame 26' designated by prime afixes. The front frame 26 is made up of spaced vertical or upright members 26a and verticallyspaced cross bar or horizontal rail members 26b and 260. The members 26a are provided with front slots a along their outer sides to removably-receive shelves 15". The shelf 15" may be of the same general construction as the shelves 15 and 15', except that the back end edge of each of its spaced pair of end wings 16" inclines forwardlydownwardly to correspond to the inclination of the support frame. In FIGURE 5, if the frame 26 inclines about 13, then the back edge which carries the latching lugs (corresponding to 16a and 16b of FIGURE 2) will also slope about 13.

It will be noted that where, as shown in FIGURE 5, the frames 26 and 26 have an off-vertical inclination, the shelves 15 have a horizontally-offset positioning. This enables the cloth bolts 18 to be positioned endwise on a vertical plane for better display and in such a manner that loose folds of an upper tier of cloth bolts will not drape over the cloth bolts of a lower tier.

her as on the front frame 26.

The cross member 26b serves as a top end connecting member and the member 26c serves as an intermediate connecting member for the front frame 26; such members serve to connect the vertical members 26a and to reinforce the frame. The back frame 26' is shown provided with corresponding box-like or hollow rectangular cross members 26'b and 26'0.

The upper end of the back frame 26' is provided with a pair of outwardly-projecting side-strap members 28 which are integrally secured thereto, as by weld metal w, and which are pivotally secured to the front frame 26 by bolts or bolt and nut assemblies 29. It will be apparent that the front and back frames 26 and 26 may then be folded in shipping and in storing to a substantially abutting parallel relation with each other. A pair of removable connecting arms 30 are provided in a spaced relation above the lower ends of the frames 26 and 26 and are secured in position by bolts or bolt and nut assemblies 31 to provide the desired angular relation or slope between the back frames. I preferably provide a backward slope fom the vertical for the frames 26 and 26 of about 13. I also prefer to make the shelves of shorter outward width or outward extent than the shelves 15 and 15'. For example, if the latter shelves are about 14 inches, the shelves 15" may be about 7 /2 inches in width or outward extent.

It will be noted from FIGURE 3 of the drawings that the holder is of a peculiar shape, such that a bolt of material 18 may be tilted outwardly and fully supported on the holder by the thickness of its material at its front portion on and along the back leg portion 200 (see B), and maintained in a supported relation until the bolt is lifted on an inclined plane outwardly off the holder (see C). By making it possible to tilt the bolts 18, as represented by position B, very little overhead space is necessary between the top of one bolt level, tier or row and the bottom of an upper bolt level, tier or row; it has to be only sufficient for a slight arc of movement of the upper end of the bolt being tilted. It will be noted that the cloth bolt 18 is supported in its endwise, vertical upright position (see A) on a shelf by the thickness of the material of its front portion along the front leg portion 20a (see FIGURE 8). Contrary to a conventional type of holder, the holder 20 of my invention does not require lifting the bolt vertically-upwardly for removal or for demonstrating it to a customer. In fact, the material can be displayed to the customer without removing it from the holder by moving it to its second or outer tilted position B. It is thus apparent that a series of bolts may be vertically-positioned above each other with a great savings of space. Also there is nothing to rub against the fabric to soil it, since the bolts 18 can be removed by the clerk by merely placing her hand on the upper end of a supporting mandrel 19 to effect the tilting movement and for slidable removal and insertion of the bolt with respect to the holder 20.

A suitable closely-adjacent side relationship may be re- .tained between upright bolts 18 of each tier, since the holders 20 are slidable along the shelves 15, 15' or 15" and are retained in a set position by the flexibly-clamped-on frictional engagement of their feet with the front and back pair of shelf rail or bar members due to the shape and tensioning of the wire or rod-like upper portions of the holder. The reinfocing back or cross rail members 1110, 13c and 13d of FIGURE 1 also serve to separate side tiers of cloth bolts that are on the same level.

Although, for simplicity of illustration, I have shown shelves 15" only mounted on the front frame 26 of the A or inverted V construction of FIGURE 5, I also contemplate providing slots a along the back frame 26', and detachably-mounting shelves therealong in the same man- In this construction, a lower shelf 15" has a forward-vertical offset relation with an upper shelf 15", such that a loose length of cloth drape from an upper bolt 18 will not tend to cover up the material of a lower cloth bolt.

Although I have illustrated preferred forms of my invention, 'it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and additions may be made without departing from its spirit and scope, as indicated by the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A display and utility rack for cloth bolts which comprises, a support frame, at least one shelf carried by said support frame, said shelf having a pair of front and back bars in a spaced-apart relation therealong, at least one holder for positioning a cloth bolt in an upright position on said shelf, said holder being of integral construction and having a pair of front and back upwardlyprojecting and converging leg portions for slidably-receiving the cloth bolt thereon, said holder having an upper connector portion connecting said leg portions together in an apex and in a downwardly-flaring relation with respect to each other, a pair of foot portions shaped to fit on said bars, one of said foot portions being secured to a lower end of one of said leg portions and the other of said foot portions being secured to a lower end of the other of said leg portions, one of said foot portions being flexibly-held on one of said bars and the other of said foot portions being flexibly-held on the other of said bars by said leg portions for sliding movement therealong, and said foot portions being constructed for movement into and out of a slidably-mounted position on an associated one of said bars when said leg portions are manually-flexed with respect to each other.

2. A rack as defined in claim 1 wherein, said leg portions are stressed for flexible resistance to manually-imposed movement in one direction with respect to each other, and each of said foot portions has an enclosing side and a side that is open for insertion and removal of said foot portions with respect to their associated bars when said leg portions are manually-flexed in the one direction with respect to each other.

3. A rack as defined in claim 1 wherein, said front leg portion extends vertically-downwardly from said connector portion perpendicular to said shelf whereby said front leg portion will provide a support along an inner front portion of the bolt to position the bolt in an endwise-upright position on said shelf, and said back leg portion declines backwardly-downwardly from said connector portion towards said shelf whereby said back leg portion will provide a support along an inner back portion of the bolt to position it in an outwardly-tilted relation on said shelf.

4. A display and utility rack suitable for cloth bolts wrapped on a mandrel which comprises, an upright support frame, at least one shelf detachably-carried by said support frame to project outwardly therefrom, at least one holder slidably-positioned for movement along said shelf to removably-receive the cloth bolt endwise along its mandrel and support it in an upright position on said shelf, said shelf having a pair of spaced-apart longitudinally-extending front and back bars, said holder having a pair of upwardly-projecting leg portions connected at their upper ends and flexibly stressed with respect to each other, each of said leg portions having a concave foot portion, one of said foot portions being slidably-positioned on one of said bars and the other of said foot portions being slidably-positioned on the other of said bars, and each said foot portion having an open side with respect to its associated bar, so that said leg portions when manually-flexed can be employed to insert and remove said foot portions from said bars.

5. A rack as defined in claim 4 wherein a back bar extends along said support frame in an upward position behind said shelf for supporting a back portion of the bolt in its upright positioning on said holder.

6. A rack as defined in claim 4 wherein said front leg projects vertically to support a front portion of the cloth thickness of the bolt when the bolt is in an upright position on said shelf, and said back leg declines backwardly- ,downwardly to support a back portion of the cloth thickness of the bolt in a forwardly-tilted position on said shelf.

7. A display and utility rack suitable for cloth bolts which comprises, an upright support frame, at least one shelf mounted on said support frame to project outwardly there-from, said shelf'having a pair of spaced-apart longitudinally-extending front and back bars, at least one holder for positioning on said shelf, said holder having an upwardly-projecting pair of legs connected at their top ends and normally flexed-inwardly with respect to each other, a front one of said legs having a channel foot slidably-mounted on said front bar and the back one of said legs having a channel foot slidably-mounted on said back bar, each said foot having a portion open towards the other foot whereby said legs may be manually flexed-outwardly to insert and remove said holder from said pair of bars, and said feet and said bars having a complementary fitting relation whereby said holder is flexiblyretained for sliding movement on said shelf.

8. A display and utility rack for adjacently positioning a group of cloth bolts wherein each bolt is wrapped on a mandrel which comprises, a vertically-upwardly projecting support frame having a pair of spaced-apart vertical upright members and cross-extending vertically-spacedapart cross-connecting members, latching slots in a spaced vertical relation along an outer face of said vertical members, a shelf frame having end members connected by a pair of spaced-apart longitudinally-extending rail members, said end members having latching lugs to detachablyengage within the latching slots of said vertical upright members of said support frame, a group of holders one for each cloth bolt, each of said holders being constructed to flexibly clamp-n said rail members in an upwardlyprojecting relation for removably-receiving a cloth bolt endwise along its mandrel, each said holder having a pair of feet provided with a complementary fit with said rail members for slidable movement therealong, and each of said feet having an open side, so that said feet may be moved into and out of a mounted position on said rail members when said holder is manually-flexed.

9. A cloth bolt display and utility rack which comprises, a vertical support frame having a pair of spacedapart vertical upright members, a shelf mounted on said upright members to project outwardly therefrom, said shelf having a pair of outwardly spaced-apart longitudinally-extending bar members therealong, at least one bolt holder for said shelf, said bolt holder being of flexible construction and having a pair of upwardly-projecting leg members that are flexibly-stressed for movement with respect to each other by an upper end connecting portion, a slide foot secured to and carried by a lower end of each of said legs, one of said slide feet having a substantially complementary telescopic slide-fit on one of said bars and the other of said feet having a substantially complementary telescopic slide-fit on the other of said bars, and each of said feet having an open side whereby said legs may be flexed to insert and remove said feet with respect to said bars.

10. A rack as defined in claim 9 wherein, a front one of said legs extends substantially vertically-downwardly to support a cloth bolt in the upright position on said .shelf, and a back one of said legs slopes backwardlydownwardly and outwardly from said connecting portion to support the cloth bolt in a forwardly-inclined position on said shelf when said legs are positioned between the mandrel and an inner layer of the cloth bolt.

11. A rack as defined in claim 9 wherein, said legs are flexibly-stressed for inward movement towards each other by said connecting portion, each of said feet is of channel-shape and is adapted to be positioned on an associated bar of said shelf in an open-face relation with respect to the other of said feet whereby said legs may be flexed-outwardly with respect to each other to remove said feet from said bars.

12. A cloth bolt display and utility rack which comprises, a support frame, said frame having a pair of substantially rectangular unitary end frame members and a substantially rectangular cross-extending central frame member, said central frame member being detachablysecured to said end frame members at its ends in an intermediate position with respect to said end frames, said central and end frames having latching slots along their outer sides, said central frame and said end frames having cross-connecting members in a vertically-spaced relation with respect to each other, at least one side shelf of unitary construction having a pair of spaced-apart rails therealong connected by end members, said end members having latching tongues for removably-positioning said side shelf on said central frame at adjacent latching slots therealong, at least one end shelf of similar construction to said side shelf for removable-positioning on at least one of said end frames at adjacent latching slots therealong, at least one end shelf of similar construcon each of said shelves, each of said holders having up wardly-extending inverted V-shaped flexible portions and a pair of opposed slide feet at lower ends of said flexible portions slidably-positioned on the rails of an associated one of said shelves, and said inverted V-shaped portions of each of said holders being flexed to mount and dismount said slide feet with respect to the pair of rails and back frames at their top ends in a pivoted relation with respect to each other in such a manner that said front and back frames may be moved from a flat abutting relation with respect to each other into an outwardly-pro jecting A-shaped relation with respect to each other, means extending across between lower portions of said front and back frames for removably-securing them in their outwardly-projecting relation with respect to each other, and wherein; at least one shelf is removably-carried by at least one of said frames, said shelf has a pair of spaced-apart longitudinally extending front and back bars of rectangular shape, a group of bolt holders are provided for said shelf, each of said bolt holders has upwardlyprojecting portions of inverted V-shape that are flexiblystressed for inward movement with respect to their lower ends, a pair of feet are secured to the lower ends of said upwardly-projecting portions, said feet are of channelshape open-inwardly with respect to each other and are adapted to slidably-fit on the front and back bars of an associated one of said shelves for sliding non-turning movement with respect thereto, and each of said holders is removable from its associated shelf by manually-outwardly spreading its upwardly-projecting portions to move said feet into a spread relation off said front and back bars.

14. A rack as defined in claim 13 wherein, said shelf has a pair of spaced-apart end wings, said front and back bars extend between said end wings, each of said end wings has a back edge portion detachably-secured to said one frame, and said back edge portions have a forwarddownward inclination from the vertical substantially corresponding to a backward inclination from the vertical of said one frame whereby said shelf projects on a substantial horizontal plane from said one frame, so that cloth bolts may be positioned on said holders to project fully vertically-upwardly from said shelf.

15. A rack as defined in claim 13 wherein, said one frame has at least a pair of shelves of the defined construction, said shelves are carried on upper and lower substantially horizontal planes to project from said one 9 10 frame, and the lower one of said shelves is forwardly- 2,260,294 10/1941 Brown 21144 vertically-offset with respect to an upper one of said 3,021,961 2/1962 Ruhnke 211177 shelves. 3,194,528 7/ 1965 Chesley 211 -184 X References Cited by the Examlner 5 FOREIGN PATENTS UNITED STATES PATENTS 937,111 9/1963 Great Britain.

1,556,624 10/1925 Pevenick 211178 X 1,655,593 1/1928 Bulman 211177 X 2,002,128 5/1935 Reidenbaugh 211 177 X CLAUDE LE Pr'mmy Examme" 2,062,802 12/ 1936 Walker 21144 W. D. LOULAN, Assistant Examiner.

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US6216884Aug 5, 1999Apr 17, 2001L.A. Darling CompanyFabric bolt hanger
US6364137 *Aug 22, 2000Apr 2, 2002Coors Brewing CompanyPortable multi-brand display rack
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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/44, 211/187
International ClassificationA47F7/17, A47F7/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47F7/175
European ClassificationA47F7/17B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 4, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: MEASUREGRAPH COMPANY
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004377/0384
Effective date: 19841231
Feb 27, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC., 135 SOUTH LASALL
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MEASUREGRAPH COMPANY THE;REEL/FRAME:003829/0697
Effective date: 19810102
Feb 11, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: MEASUREGRAPH COMPANY, 55 WEST MONROE ST., STE. 230
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MEASUREGRAPH COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:003828/0643
Effective date: 19810102