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Publication numberUS3272556 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1966
Filing dateApr 2, 1964
Priority dateApr 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3272556 A, US 3272556A, US-A-3272556, US3272556 A, US3272556A
InventorsElmer Rocker
Original AssigneeElmer Rocker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable baby seat
US 3272556 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 13, 1966 E. ROCKER 3,272,556

ADJUSTABLE BABY SEAT Filed April 2, 1964 INVENTOR.

ELME R ROCKER QIP IZW,

ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,272,556 ADJUSTABLE BABY SEAT Elmer Rocker, 2 587 Falmouth Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio Filed Apr. 2, 1964, Ser. No. 356,899 Claims. (Cl. 297-310) The present invention relates to a support stand and, more particularly, to an adjustable support stand for a baby seat or the like.

Within recent years, a lightweight carrier designed to seat or otherwise support an infant has become increasingly popular. At times it is desired merely to nest the infant within the carrier while the latter is carried about as in shopping; or alternatively it is desired to prop up the carrier and use it in place of a high chair as for feed- The present invention provides an improved supporting means for a carrier which may be collapsed or folded away in a locked position for portability or used in one of several supporting positions as a stand for the carrier.

It is therefore a principal object of the present invention to provide an improved support stand for a baby carrier or the like.

Another object is to provide such a stand that may be locked in place against the carrier during periods of nonuse and then used selectively to support the carrier in one of several standing positions.

A further object is to provide a support means for a baby carrier or the like involving a leverage system wherein the heavier a weight in the carrier, the tighter the parts of the support means engage one another.

Other objects will become apparent as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention consists of the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the annexed drawing and following disclosure describing in detail the invention, such drawing and disclosure illustrating, however, but one or more of the various ways in which the invention may be practiced.

In the accompanying drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a carrier having the present support stand in closed locked position;

FIGURE 2 is a right-hand view of FIGURE 1 and illustrates the back of the carrier;

FIGURES 3, 4, and 5 are side elevational views of the carrier and support means in different supporting positions; and

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the interlocking means of the present stand.

As indicated, the present supporting stand in one form is collapsable or foldable in order to be stored in a fixed position against the back of a carrier. When needed the stand is set at one of a number of supporting positions and embodies, as Well, several other improved structural features as hereinafter described.

The carrier body itself may comprise various shapes and structures, the present invention residing in the novel support means for such a carrier. Preferably, the carrier body is of a lightweight plastic such as polyethylene and may be molded as one piece. Other well known plastic materials can also be used. The carrier illustrated in the drawings comprises a body B of a flexible resilient plastic material having a back portion 11 and opposed sides 11 which terminate in a folded rim 12. The sides 11 which are similar slope away from the back portion 10 to form a seat or bottom 13 which normally receives the seat of the infant. If desired the back 11 and sides 11 may be slotted to reduce the weight and provide ventilation.

ice

The present support stand comprises a pair of generally U-shaped frames or braces pivotally journaled to the back portion 1i). Normally, the frames are formed from resilient rod-like material and preferably from relatively stiff, heavy gauge steel wire. One of such U-shaped wire frames 14 has its legs 14a converging toward their free ends. The very tips of the legs 14a are bent inwardly (FIGURE 2) to engage plastic bosses 15 molded integrally with the body B at a medial section of the back portion 10 and substantially in a widthwise direction. To mount the wire frame 14 with respect to the bosses 15, the legs 14a are spread sufliciently apart to insert the tips into openings (not shown) in the bosses 15. Thereafter, the natural resiliency of the wire frame 14 urges the legs inwardly to maintain engagement with the bosses. The wire frame 14 is thus free to swing from a closed position adjacent the backs 10 to a position outwardly therefrom.

Each of the legs 14a has a plurality of offset portions or loops 16 (FIGURE 6) to define notches. The notches of one leg 14a match or are opposed to the other leg 14a. The bight portion 14b of wire frame 14 has a pair of resilient, elastomeric sleeves 17. The latter are freely rotatabfe about the bight portion 14b and may be axially slotted to permit mounting on the wire. The bight portion 14b also has an offset which serves to keep the sleeves 17 in a desired position. A pair of nubs 18 frictionally engage and hold the wire frame 14 in the position illustrated by FIGURES 1 and 2. In one form, these nubs have raised bases molded with the body B to which rubber tips 19 are adhered or otherwise secured.

A second U-shaped wire frame 20 also has its legs 20;! converging toward its free ends. The tips of the legs 20a are bent outwardly (FIGURE 2) to engage openings in plastic bosses 21, similar to bosses 15, at an end section of the back portion 11 and placed substantially in a widthwise direction thereof. To mount wire frame 20, the legs 29a are pressed toward each other in order to clear the bosse 21 and the ends of the legs then inserted into such bosses, the natural resiliency of wire frame 20 thereafter urging the legs toward the raised bosses. The wire frame 20 is thus free to swing from a closed position adjacent the back 10 to a position outwardly therefrom. At each of the corners defined by the juncture of legs 20a and the bight portion 20b of wire frame 20, there is a resilient elastomeric sleeve 22;. The sleeves 22 may be slipped on the wire frame 20 before it is bent, or the sleeves may be applied as a complete integral coating in a manner known in the art.

In use, if the stand is not needed as during carrying the seat or for storage, the wires may be mutually locked against the back portion 10. It will be noted that, aided by the convergence of the legs of both wire frames 14 and 20, the legs 14a overlap legs 20a when the wires are in a closed position against the back portion 10. Moreover, the nubs 18 catch the bight portion 14b and therefore latch not only wire frame 14 but wire frame 20 in the closed position. It will further be noted that the divergence of the legs 14a (toward the bight portion 14b) prevents wire frame 20 from passing around wire frame 14. In addition, it is emphasized that the ends of the legs 14a adjacent the tips are bent out of the plane of the legs 14a toward the back portion 10 (FIG. 1) to permit the legs 14a to overlie the legs 20a as aforesaid and still be substantially flat against the back portion 10 for a substantial portion of their length.

Since wire frame 14 makes a rather tight fit around the nubs, it has been found most helpful to make the sleeves 17 rotatable about the bight portion 14b. Not only do the sleeves 17 thereby easily ride over the nubs 18 to a latched position, but it is a relatively simple matter to loosen wire frame 14 (and therefore wire frame 20) from the closed positions by turning the sleeves 17 on the bight portion 14d to cause the bight portion 14d to roll off of the nubs rather than to pull directly on the wire frame 14.

When it is desired to use the stand, both wire frames 14 and 20 swing outwardly, and the bight portion 20b of wire frame 20 fits within matching or opposed notches 16 of the legs 14a. The entrance to each notch or loop 16 (FIGURE 6) is of a shorter distance than the diameter of the loop, so that once the wire fits within a notch it is tightly retained. In this regard, the use of an elastic covering 22 has been found to be most helpful as a safety measure, since the frictional grip between the two wires at the loops or notches 16 is considerably enhanced.

FIGURES 3 through illustrate various open stand positions, depending on which of the loops or notches in the legs 14a are engaged by the bight portion 2012. In these illustrated positions, it will also be noted that the sleeves 17 serve an additional purpose by gripping a sustaining surface S and thereby prevent slipping.

As more weight is applied to the seat, the wires of the present stand are actually pressed in tighter engagement. For example, referring to FIGURE 4, as the body B receives more weight, there is a tendency to spread apart the body B and thus the nubs 18 and bight portion 14b and flex the legs 14a. This only urges the wire frame 20 into still tighter engagement with the legs of wire frame 14 because of the connection of the former wire frame with the bosses 21. In addition, this weight causes the notches 16 to close more tightly about the sleeves 17 and wire portion 20b.

It will now be apparent that the present invention provides an improved support stand for a baby carrier or the like. The stand may be latched in place against the carrier in a closed position during periods of non-use, and then selectively employed to support the carrier in one of several open positions.

Other forms embodying the features of the invention may be employed, change being made as regards the features herein disclosed, provided those stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such features be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention:

1. In a baby seat or the like comprising a body having a back portion and a seat portion, support means including a first generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled to a medial portion of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, and a second generally U- shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled adjacent an end of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, said first U-shaped wire frame having opposed offset loops which are adapted to be engaged by the bight portion of said second U-shaped wire frame upon outward pivoting of said wire frames as aforesaid to interlock said wire frames, the entrance to said loops being of a shorter distance than the diameter of said second wire frame bight portion, whereby said loops must be sprung apart at their entrance to permit entry and removal of said bight portion, the corners defined by the juncture of the bight portion of said second generally U-shaped wire frame with the legs thereof having a resilient elastomeric coating means for frictionally engaging said loops.

2. In a baby seat or the like comprising a body having a back portion and a seat portion, support means including a first generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled to a medial portion of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, a second generally U- shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled adjacent an end of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly there- 5 from, the bight portion of said second U-shaped wire frame being adapted to engage the legs of said first U- shaped wire frame upon outward pivoting of said wire frames to define a support stand for said body, the legs of said first U-shaped wire frame overlapping those of said second wire frame when said frames are in such closed positions, said legs of each of said generally U- shaped wire frames converging at their free ends in order to facilitate the overlapping of the legs of said first wire frame with respect to those of said second wire frame and insure a tight snug fit of said wire frames against said back portion in the defined closed positions and means for releasably latching said first wire frame to said back portion thereby to contain both wire frames in such closed position-s for carrying or storage.

3. In a baby seat or the like comprising a body having a back portion and a seat portion, support means including a first generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled to a medial portion of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, a second generally U- shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled adjacent an end of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, the bight portion of said second U-shaped wire frame being adapted to engage the legs of said first U- shaped wire frame upon outward pivoting of said wire frames to define a support stand for said body, the legs of said first U-shaped wire frame overlapping those of said second wire frame when said frames are in such closed positions, and means for releasably latching said first wire frame to said back portion thereby to contain both wire frames in such closed positions for carrying or storage, said latching means comprising nub portions on said body which are adapted to be releasably engaged by the bight portion of said first generally U-shaped Wire frame.

4. The support means of claim 3 wherein the bight portion of said first generally U-shaped wire frame has a sleeve means mounted thereon for engagement with one of said nub portions upon movement of said first wire frame to the closed position as aforesaid, said sleeve means being mounted for rotation on said bight portion to facilitate engagement and disengagement of said bight portion of said first wire frame from said one nub portion.

5. The support means of claim 4 wherein the bight portion of said first generally U-shaped wire frame has an offset section to retain said sleeve means in a desired position on said first wire frame.

6. A support stand comprising a back portion, a first generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled to a medial portion of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, and a second generally U- shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled adjacent an end of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, said first U-shaped wire frame having opposed offset loops which are adapted to be engaged by the bight portion of said second U-shaped wire frame upon outward pivoting of said wire frames as aforesaid to interlock said wire frames, the entrance to said loops being of a shorter distance than the diameter of said second wire frame bight portion, whereby said loops must be sprung apart at their entrance to permit entry and removal of said bight portion, the corners defined by the juncture of the bight portion of said second generally U-shaped wire frame with the legs thereof having a resilient elastomeric coating means for friction'ally engaging said loop.

7. A support stand comprising a back portion, a first generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled to a medial portion of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, a second generally Ushaped Wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled adjacent an end of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, the bight portion of said second U-shaped wire frame being adapted to engage the legs of said first U-shaped wire frame upon outward pivoting of said wire frames to define a support stand for said back portion, the legs of said first U-shaped wire frame overlapping those of said second wire frame when said frames are in such closed positions, said legs of each of said generally U-shaped wire frames converging at their free ends in order to facilitate the overlapping of the legs of said first wire frame with respect to those of said second wire frame and insure a tight snug fit of said wire frames against said back portion in the defined closed positions, and means for releasably latching said first Wire frame to said back portion thereby to contain both wire frames in such closed positions for carrying or storage.

8. A support stand comprising a back portion, a first generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled to a medial portion of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, a second generally U-shaped wire frame having its ends pivotally journaled adjacent an end of said back portion substantially widthwise thereof and 30 adapted to swing from a closed position adjacent said back portion to a position outwardly therefrom, the bight portion of said second U-shaped'wire frame being adapted to engage the legs of said first U-shaped wire frame upon outward pivoting of said wire frames to define a support stand for said back portion, the legs of said first U-shaped wire frame overlapping those of said second wire frame when said frames are in such closed positions, and means for releasably latching said first wire frame to said back portion thereby to contain both wire frames in such closed positions for carrying or storage, said latching means comprising nub portions on said back portions which are adapted to be releasably engaged by the bight portion of said first generally U-shaped wire frame.

9. The support stand of claim 8 wherein the bight portion of said first generally U-shaped wire frame has a sleeve means mounted thereon for engagement with one of said nub portions upon movement of said first wire frame to the closed position as aforesaid], said sleeve means being mounted for rotation on said bight portion to facilitate engagement and disengagement of said bight portion of said first wire frame from said one nub portion.

10. The support stand of claim 9 wherein the bight portion of said first generally U-shaped wire frame has an offset section to retain said sleeve means in a desired position on said first wire frame.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 583,708 6/1897 Liebman 40152.1 619,743 2/1899 Hathaway 40152.1 1,659,871 2/1928 Hartman 248-465 2,521,412 9/1950 Sack 5327 3,171,687 3/1965 Jensen 297377 FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

J. S. PETRIE, R. B. FARLEY, G. O. FINCH,

Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
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US583708 *Nov 2, 1896Jun 1, 1897 Rudolph liebmann
US619743 *Dec 14, 1898Feb 21, 1899 Picture-frame
US1659871 *Apr 27, 1927Feb 21, 1928American Mirror WorksEasel
US2521412 *May 20, 1949Sep 5, 1950Harry SackAngularly adjustable and collapsible back rest
US3171687 *Sep 18, 1962Mar 2, 1965Infanseat CompanyBaby carrier apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3351380 *May 26, 1966Nov 7, 1967Sprague Robert PaulInfant carrier for use with shopping carts
US3409325 *Mar 3, 1967Nov 5, 1968Hamilton Cosco IncInfant's chair
US3653080 *Nov 23, 1970Apr 4, 1972Raymond Lee Organization IncRocking infant seat
US3683430 *Sep 9, 1970Aug 15, 1972Bradley William JTiltable headboard for beds
US3976328 *Oct 6, 1975Aug 24, 1976Questor CorporationBaby carrier and seat
US3989173 *Apr 2, 1973Nov 2, 1976Gerico, Inc.Hinged leg stand for child carrier
US4044931 *Feb 3, 1975Aug 30, 1977Pietro CatelliTubular back supported child carrier
US4065175 *Jul 6, 1976Dec 27, 1977Giuseppe PeregoConvertible chair
US4123102 *Jul 22, 1977Oct 31, 1978Alexander C. DaswickAdjustable reclining chair having three-point suspension, and method
US4510634 *Sep 30, 1983Apr 16, 1985Diedrich Brian JInfant carrier
US5660597 *May 11, 1995Aug 26, 1997Fox; Lawrence A.Vibratory child pacifying device
US6253392Jul 22, 1999Jul 3, 2001The First Years Inc.Bathtub-bathseat
EP0955000A1 *May 5, 1999Nov 10, 1999AmpafranceA device for adjusting the inclination of a children's chair, and corresponding chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/310, 297/377
International ClassificationA47D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47D1/002
European ClassificationA47D1/00B