Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3273562 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 20, 1966
Filing dateApr 17, 1963
Priority dateFeb 24, 1960
Publication numberUS 3273562 A, US 3273562A, US-A-3273562, US3273562 A, US3273562A
InventorsBrown Marthe E
Original AssigneeErnest C Wood, Rene G Le Vaux
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Skin and surgical clips
US 3273562 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 20, 1966 A. M. BROWN SKIN AND SURGICAL CLIPS Original Filed Feb. 24. 1960 N VE N TOR Adolph/14. Brown United States Patent 3,273,562 SIGN AND SURGICAL CUPS Adolph M. Brown, deceased, late of Beverly Hills, Calif., by Marthe E. Brown, administratrix, Beverly Hills, Calif., assignor of twenty percent to Rene G. Le Vaux and twenty percent to Ernest C. Wood Original application Feb. 24, 1960, Ser. No. 10,595, now Patent No. 3,098,232, dated July 23, 1963. Divided and this application Apr. 17, 1963, Ser. No. 273,791

ll (Ilairn. ((li. l28337) This application is a division of copending application Ser. No. 10,595, filed Feb. 24, 1960, entitled Means and Method for Suturing Wounds and Elements for Use in Same, now Patent No. 3,098,232.

This invention relates to a method and means for bringing together separated sections of skin heretofore achieved by taking stitches into the skin, and it relates further to elements for use in the practice of same.

To the present, when laceration or incision of a skin layer occurs in wounds or the like, it has been the practice to stitch the separated sections of the skin together for the purpose of reducing scar formation and to accelerate healing of the wound. Such stitching operation constitutes a surgical operation wherein the separated sections of the skin are brought together and then stitched, as by a needle and thread, to hold the separated sections together until the wound has healed. When sufiicient time has elapsed, such as from -7 days, the stitches are removed by pulling the stitches from the wound after the threads have been severed.

Such stitching operation constitutes a rather painful procedure which lasts a considerable period of time. In addition, it requires the services of both hands of one or more physicians to hold the separated sections of the skin together, to thread the needle, to pass the needle through adjacent edge portions of the severed skin layer, to tie the thread with the desired tension to close the stitch, and then to sever the loose ends of the threads when the stitch has been completed. All of this leads to the utilization of considerable time in the surgical operation, coupled with interferences of a bleeding wound. Time is a factor in a bleeding Wound, and freedom of the hands of the physician is a factor in the best care of the wound.

It is an object of this invention to provide a method and means for quickly and efiiciently bringing the adjacent edge portions of severed sections of the skin together for closing Wounds and for holding the sections together until healed.

A further object is to produce skin clips for use in clipping the skin together to close a wound.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will hereinafter appear and for purposes of illustration, but not of limitation, embodiments of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a clip adapted to be used with the clip applicator;

FIG. 2 is a plan View of a clip as shaped when applied to a wound;

FIG. 3 is a front view of a clip employed in the practice of this invention.

The important feature of this invention resides in the clips 30 used with a clip applicator. As seen in FIGS. 1,

ice

2 and 3, the clip is formed from sheet material, preferably metal, and in this particular embodiment the body is planar and generally U-shaped, with a rear web or bail portion 68 and forwardly extending leg portions 70. This arrangement is desirable because it is simple and inexpensive. The bail portion 68 is of lesser width at its central portion than at the end portions to define a central area of weakness for bending when the arms are displaced in the direction towards each other.

A pair of points or spicules 72 are inclined downward and toward each other from the front edge 71 of each clip.

With these arrangements, pressure on the sides of the clip sulficient to bend the leg portions 70, see FIG. 2, would cause points 72 on the legs to move toward each other. When the clip is pressed onto a wound, pressure on the sides of the clip causes tthe points to penetrate the skin to bring the margins together. While in position of use, the body of the clip is free of the skin. This is important because it permits a suitable clip remover to be inserted between the leg portions for separation of the legs and removal of the clips from the skin without exerting any pressure on the wound.

The invention may be embodied in other forms Without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof as set forth in the claim, and the present embodiment is therefore to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive and it is intended to include all changes which come Within the scope and range of the claim.

What is claimed is:

A skin clip comprising a flat, sheet metal member which is deformable and which remains in the shape to which it is deformed consisting of a crosswise extending bail por tion, an elongate arm extending forwardly perpendicularly from each of the outer ends of said bail portion, said bail portion and arms having fiat top and bottom surfaces of substantial width by comparison With the depths between said top and bottom surfaces and with each arm having a forward end portion and inner and outer lateral edges throughout the lengths thereof, spicules integral with the inner edges of each arm in the forward end portion thereof and extending inwardly in the direction towards each other and angularly downwardly beyond the plane formed by the bottom walls of the arms, the forward edge of said crosswise extending bail being tapered rearwardly from the outer ends inwardly towards the center to provide a bail of decreasing width from the outer ends towards the center of the bail.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 733,723 7/1903 Lukens 128-337 816,026 3/1906 Meier 128-337 2,329,440 9/1943 La Place 1-56 X 2,817,339 12/1957 Sullivan 128-337 X 3,006,344 10/1961 Vogelfanger 128334 X RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. D. L. TRULUCK, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US733723 *Feb 16, 1903Jul 14, 1903Clarence D LukensSerrefin.
US816026 *Mar 9, 1905Mar 27, 1906Albert J MeierSurgical clip.
US2329440 *Apr 2, 1941Sep 14, 1943Bocjl CorpFastener
US2817339 *Aug 10, 1953Dec 24, 1957Sullivan Norman MRigid fascial suture
US3006344 *Feb 24, 1959Oct 31, 1961Isaac J VogelfangerSurgical ligator and cutter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3583397 *Sep 25, 1968Jun 8, 1971Baddour George AFinger traction device
US3586002 *Jan 8, 1968Jun 22, 1971Wood Ernest CSurgical skin clip
US4261244 *May 14, 1979Apr 14, 1981Senco Products, Inc.Surgical staple
US4610250 *Oct 8, 1985Sep 9, 1986United States Surgical CorporationTwo-part surgical fastener for fascia wound approximation
US4994073 *Feb 22, 1989Feb 19, 1991United States Surgical Corp.Skin fastener
US5089009 *Jun 27, 1989Feb 18, 1992United States Surgical CorporationInwardly biased skin fastener
US5342376 *May 3, 1993Aug 30, 1994Dermagraphics, Inc.Inserting device for a barbed tissue connector
US5593423 *Jan 27, 1995Jan 14, 1997United States Surgical CorporationSkin fastener
US5658312 *Apr 20, 1995Aug 19, 1997United States Surgical CorporationSkin fastener
US5941890 *Jun 26, 1998Aug 24, 1999Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Implantable surgical marker
US6241747Oct 18, 1994Jun 5, 2001Quill Medical, Inc.Barbed Bodily tissue connector
US6425903May 9, 2000Jul 30, 2002James W. VoegeleImplantable surgical marker
US6599310Jun 29, 2001Jul 29, 2003Quill Medical, Inc.Suture method
US6916327 *Mar 7, 2001Jul 12, 2005Metacardia, Inc.Device for creating an anastomosis, including penetration structure and eversion structure
US7056331Sep 30, 2002Jun 6, 2006Quill Medical, Inc.Suture method
US7225512Aug 29, 2002Jun 5, 2007Quill Medical, Inc.Method of forming barbs on a suture and apparatus for performing same
US7226468Apr 21, 2003Jun 5, 2007Quill Medical, Inc.Barbed bodily tissue connector
US7552854May 21, 2007Jun 30, 2009Applied Medical Resources CorporationSurgical stapler with firing lock mechanism
US7624487May 13, 2003Dec 1, 2009Quill Medical, Inc.Apparatus and method for forming barbs on a suture
US7648055Sep 5, 2008Jan 19, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus with powered articulation
US7731073Jun 30, 2009Jun 8, 2010Applied Medical Resources CorporationSurgical stapler with firing lock mechanism
US7757925Apr 23, 2008Jul 20, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpBattery powered surgical instrument
US7806908Jan 2, 2008Oct 5, 2010Quill Medical, Inc.Barbed tissue connector
US7823760May 1, 2007Nov 2, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpPowered surgical stapling device platform
US7857829May 11, 2007Dec 28, 2010Quill Medical, Inc.Suture method
US7870989Jul 24, 2008Jan 18, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapler with timer and feedback display
US7909221Oct 8, 2008Mar 22, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpBattery powered surgical instrument
US7913365Mar 27, 2007Mar 29, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Method of forming barbs on a suture and apparatus for performing same
US7922063Oct 16, 2008Apr 12, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group, LpPowered surgical instrument
US7931660May 10, 2007Apr 26, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpPowered tacker instrument
US7934629Jun 8, 2010May 3, 2011Applied Medical Resources CorporationSurgical stapler with firing lock mechanism
US7950560Apr 13, 2007May 31, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpPowered surgical instrument
US7996967Aug 4, 2010Aug 16, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.System for variable-angle cutting of a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US7996968Aug 4, 2010Aug 16, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Automated method for cutting tissue retainers on a suture
US8006887Jan 12, 2010Aug 30, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus with powered articulation
US8011072Aug 4, 2010Sep 6, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Method for variable-angle cutting of a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US8015678Aug 4, 2010Sep 13, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Method for cutting a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US8020263Aug 4, 2010Sep 20, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Automated system for cutting tissue retainers on a suture
US8028387Aug 4, 2010Oct 4, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.System for supporting and cutting suture thread to create tissue retainers thereon
US8028388Aug 4, 2010Oct 4, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.System for cutting a suture to create tissue retainers of a desired shape and size
US8032996May 13, 2004Oct 11, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Apparatus for forming barbs on a suture
US8083770May 13, 2008Dec 27, 2011Quill Medical, Inc.Suture anchor and method
US8092493Jul 20, 2011Jan 10, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus with powered articulation
US8118834Dec 19, 2008Feb 21, 2012Angiotech Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Composite self-retaining sutures and method
US8132705Dec 10, 2010Mar 13, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapler with timer and feedback display
US8157150Oct 20, 2011Apr 17, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapler with timer and feedback display
US8201721Mar 9, 2011Jun 19, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpPowered surgical instrument
US8216273Feb 25, 2009Jul 10, 2012Ethicon, Inc.Self-retainers with supporting structures on a suture
US8240537Dec 7, 2011Aug 14, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus with powered articulation
US8246652Aug 4, 2010Aug 21, 2012Ethicon, Inc.Suture with a pointed end and an anchor end and with equally spaced yieldable tissue grasping barbs located at successive axial locations
US8267924Jan 13, 2011Sep 18, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpPowered surgical instrument
US8281972May 3, 2011Oct 9, 2012Applied Medical Resources CorporationSurgical stapler with firing lock mechanism
US8328823Mar 21, 2011Dec 11, 2012Covidien LpPowered tacker instrument
US8348125Mar 21, 2011Jan 8, 2013Covidien LpBattery powered surgical instrument
US8419768Jul 10, 2012Apr 16, 2013Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus with powered articulation
US8459521Aug 26, 2010Jun 11, 2013Covidien LpPowered surgical stapling device platform
US8505799Apr 9, 2012Aug 13, 2013Covidien LpBattery powered surgical instrument
US8505802Feb 29, 2012Aug 13, 2013Covidien LpSurgical stapler with timer and feedback display
US8506557Jul 10, 2012Aug 13, 2013Covidien LpPowered surgical instrument
US8615856Jan 30, 2009Dec 31, 2013Ethicon, Inc.Apparatus and method for forming self-retaining sutures
US8641732Feb 25, 2009Feb 4, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining suture with variable dimension filament and method
US8652170Aug 4, 2010Feb 18, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Double ended barbed suture with an intermediate body
US8679158Aug 4, 2010Mar 25, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Multiple suture thread configuration with an intermediate connector
US8685004Jul 9, 2013Apr 1, 2014Covidien LpPowered surgical instrument
US8690914Aug 4, 2010Apr 8, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Suture with an intermediate barbed body
US8721664Mar 12, 2013May 13, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Suture methods and devices
US8721681Jun 30, 2009May 13, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Barbed suture in combination with surgical needle
US8734485Aug 4, 2010May 27, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Sutures with barbs that overlap and cover projections
US8734486Aug 4, 2010May 27, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Multiple suture thread configuration with an intermediate connector
US8747437Aug 4, 2010Jun 10, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Continuous stitch wound closure utilizing one-way suture
US8764776Aug 4, 2010Jul 1, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Anastomosis method using self-retaining sutures
US8764796Feb 10, 2006Jul 1, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Suture method
US8771313Dec 19, 2008Jul 8, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining sutures with heat-contact mediated retainers
US8777987Sep 26, 2008Jul 15, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining sutures including tissue retainers having improved strength
US8777988Aug 4, 2010Jul 15, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Methods for using self-retaining sutures in endoscopic procedures
US8777989Aug 4, 2010Jul 15, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Subcutaneous sinusoidal wound closure utilizing one-way suture
US8793863Apr 11, 2008Aug 5, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming retainers on a suture
US8795332Sep 30, 2002Aug 5, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Barbed sutures
US8800837Apr 13, 2007Aug 12, 2014Covidien LpPowered surgical instrument
US8821514May 4, 2010Sep 2, 2014Covidien LpPowered tack applier
US8821540Aug 4, 2010Sep 2, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining sutures having effective holding strength and tensile strength
US8852232Aug 4, 2010Oct 7, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining sutures having effective holding strength and tensile strength
US8875607Jan 30, 2009Nov 4, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Apparatus and method for forming self-retaining sutures
US8876865Apr 14, 2009Nov 4, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining sutures with bi-directional retainers or uni-directional retainers
US8915943Apr 3, 2008Dec 23, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining systems for surgical procedures
US8916077Dec 19, 2008Dec 23, 2014Ethicon, Inc.Self-retaining sutures with retainers formed from molten material
US8925783May 8, 2012Jan 6, 2015Covidien LpPowered surgical instrument
US8926659Dec 20, 2010Jan 6, 2015Ethicon, Inc.Barbed suture created having barbs defined by variable-angle cut
US8932328Nov 3, 2009Jan 13, 2015Ethicon, Inc.Length of self-retaining suture and method and device for using the same
US8961560Dec 16, 2010Feb 24, 2015Ethicon, Inc.Bidirectional self-retaining sutures with laser-marked and/or non-laser marked indicia and methods
US20120150240 *Feb 15, 2012Jun 14, 2012Medoff Robert JLocking pin plate assembly adapted for fracture fixation
USRE45426Jul 31, 2001Mar 17, 2015Ethicon, Inc.Surgical methods using one-way suture
DE3443367A1 *Nov 28, 1984Jun 13, 1985Kirsch Wolff MayerChirurgischer mikroklip
DE3523015A1 *Jun 27, 1985Jan 2, 1987Patrik Dr Med GruendlerDevice for the fixation of a corneal transplant in the human eye
EP0389102A1 *Feb 19, 1990Sep 26, 1990United States Surgical CorporationSkin fastener
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/221, D24/145, 24/703.1
International ClassificationA61B17/08, A61B17/03
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/083
European ClassificationA61B17/08C