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Publication numberUS3274729 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1966
Filing dateJun 17, 1964
Priority dateDec 23, 1963
Publication numberUS 3274729 A, US 3274729A, US-A-3274729, US3274729 A, US3274729A
InventorsClaude Refabert
Original AssigneeClodrey Polyflex Ets
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Doll having photocell-actuated sounding means
US 3274729 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. REFABERT 3,274,729

Sept. 27, 1966 DOLL HAVING PHOTOCELL-ACTUATED SOUNDING MEANS Filed June 17, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sept. 27, 1966 c. REFABERT 3,274,729

DOLL HAVING PHOTOCELL-ACTUATED SOUNDING MEANS Filed June 17, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 C. REFABERT Sept. 27, 1966 DOLL HAVING PHOTOCELL-ACTUATED SOUNDING MEANS Filed June 17, 1964 3 Shee ts-Sheet 5 Mm mm mm 5 mm M MM hm in M Q %m United States Patent I O The present invention relates to toys representing living subjects such as toys which simulate animals and more especially dolls.

A principal object of this invention is to provide a toy which is especially attractive for children.

The invention consists chiefly in providing a toy of I the kind in question with the following elements: a photoelectric cell, and in particular a photoconductive cell, mounted in such manner on the toy that it can be irradiated by light, either visible light or infra-red light; a small electric motor; means for energizing the motor under control of the intensity of irradiation of the cell; means, preferably including a transistor, fed with current from a battery, mounted in such manner that itsconduction depends upon the irradiation intensity and an electro-magnetic relay mounted at the output of the latter said means in such manner as to produce the energizing of said motor when said latter means is conductive and only in this case; and means operative by said motor for producing a signal, in particular an audible signal, when said motor is in operation.

According to another feature of the present invention the means for producing sound signals comp-rises a power source, a motor energized by this source, a crank driven by this motor and at least one bellows having a reed interposed between a fixed point of the toy and the eccentric pin of said crank so that the bellows is alternately stretched and compressed when the motor is operative.

According to still another feature of my invention the subject represented by tthe toy has eyes disposed in such manner as to be opened or closed according to whether the toy is upright or is lying down and the circuit of the electric motor is operatively connected 'with said eyes in such manner as to be opened when the eyes are closed.

Preferred embodiments of the present invention will be hereinafter described with reference to the appended drawings, given merely by way of example, and in which:

FIG. 1 diagrammatically shows a doll according to the present invention;

*FIG. 2 shows the electric circuit provided in said doll and the means for producing audible sounds, according to the present invention; I

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a modification of a detail of the system of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken along line IVIV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 diagrammatically shows a modification of the system of FIG. 2;

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 show three other electric circuits according to the present invention;

FIGS. 9 and 10 show in vertical section and in two different positions, respectively, the head of a doll according to the present invention.

The doll P shown in FIG. 1 carries a photoconductive cell 1 disposed at a place such that, on the one hand, it is illuminated by the ambient light when the doll is in a normal position (upright, sitting or lying on its back) and on the other hand is not normally visible to an observer.

The light sensitive area may for this purpose be located on the dolls chest, as shown by FIG. 1, in which case ice tric connections leading thereto).

This cell 1 is in an electric circuit housed in the doll and capable of energizing a small noiseless electric motor 2 which can be termed a transducer (FIG. 2) also housed in the doll, the energizing of said motor depending upon the intensity of illumination of said cell.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, the energizing of the motor with electric current supplied by -a battery 3 depends upon the intensity of irradiation of cell 1. For this purpose the electronic circuit comprises a supply battery 4, a transistor 5, a resistor 6 mounted as a voltage divider in connection with cell 1 between the collector and the emitter of the transistor in such manner as to bias the base thereof, and the coil of an electro-magnet relay 7 the contact of which controls the connection between battery 3 and motor 2.

The connection of the transistor with battery 4 is controlled by means of switches 8 and 9 mounted in series with each other and one of which is for instance located in the neck of the doll, under her hair, the other being advantageously mounted in such manner that it can be opened by the introduction of a suitable object in the dolls mouth (such as the nipple of a feeding bottle).

The operation of this electronic arrangement is as follows:

Initially motor 2 is at rest. Switches 8 and 9 are closed. If the illumination of cell 1 is sufficient, the voltage distribution in the circuit is such that transistor 5 is made conductive, which energizes electro-magnet 7 and causes motor 2 to be fed with current. The output shaft of this motor 2 therefore rotates in a continuous manner.

Suitable means for utilizing this rotation will be hereinafter described.

It will be readily understood that electro-magnet 7 is de-energized, so that motor 2 is stopped, as soon as one of the switches 8 and 9 is opened or as soon as cell 1 is no longer sufficiently illuminated.

The operation of the motor may be used to produce any desirable movement or displacement requiring but little power.

According to the preferred embodiment of the invention, which will now be described in a more detailed fashion, the rotation of the motor is used to produce a sequence of cries or sobs.

For this purpose, in the embodiment illustrated by FIG. 2, use is made of at least one bellows 10 having a vibrating reed 11 adapted to produce a sound or cry when it is flattened and/or when it is stretched.

One of the ends of this bellows is secured to a fixed point 12 and the other end is connected to the eccentric pin 13 of crank 14 driven by motor 2 through a reducing gear 15.

Of course, the connection between the bellows and fixed point 12 may be rigid, since said bellows can then be deformed without ditficulty.

Use may be made of two bellows mounted in such manner that one of them emits a sound when the other is silent and these two bellows may possibly generate two different noises.

But there is preferably only one bellows 10 arranged so that the vibrating reed 11 thereof emits one sound when air is admitted into the bellows whereas another vibrating reed emits a sound when air is evacuated (FIG. 5).

According to a second embodiment of this invention,

3 the output shaft of reducing gear 15 rotates a box 16 (FIGS. 3 and 4) carrying, side by side with each other, two systems 17 each adapted to produce sounds by the drop of a counterweight 18 provided with a vibrating reed 19, these two systems being mounted in opposition with each other in such manner that one of them produces a sound when the other is silent and vice-versa. course, I might also provide a single counterweight with two vibrating reeds corresponding each to a direction of displacement of the counterweight.

In such an embodiment, the effect that is produced is as follows, it being assumed that elements 1, 8 and 9 are disposed on the doll as indicated in FIG. 1.

Initially, switch 9 is resilently biased to a closed position and switch 8 can be closed manually.

If cell 1 is sufliciently illuminated, the doll cries.

In order to stop these cries (that is to say to stop motor 2) it suffices, as above stated, to perform one of two operations, i.e., either to protect cell 1 from the action of light or to open switch 9. The first operation may be effected by placing upon the dolls chest a coverlet or a jacket sufficiently opaque to light. When this coverlet or jacket is removed the cries are resumed (so that it can be said that the doll is crying because it is cold). The doll can also be taken in the arms of the child who is playing therewith thus applying the doll chest against that of the child and this causes the cries to cease. The doll again starts crying when leaving the arms of the child (so that it can be said that the doll is crying because it is not handled).

The second operation can be effected by introducing into the dolls mouth the nipple of a feeding bottle. -When this nipple is removed, the doll again starts crying due to switch 9 being mounted in said mouth (so that it can be said that the doll cries because it is hungry).

Switch 8 may be considered as the general switch. It is opened in order to avoid wasting the charge of the batteries.

In a satisfactory embodiment of the invention, given by way of illustration, according to the diagram of FIG. 2, the voltages supplied by batteries 3 and 4 are respectively 1.5 and 4.5 volts. Cell 1 can be of the L.D.R.O. 3

type, transistor 5 a P-N-P transistor of the QC. 72 type and motor 2 of the 1.5 volts/0.3 to 2.5 watts type.

Of course, modifications may be made to the doll above described.

The photoconductive cell 1 might be replaced by any other photoelectric cell, for instance of the photoemissive type capable of transforming the luminous or infra-red rays it receives into electric current, or of the photovoltaic type (photo-battery or cell with a stopping layer), or again of the photo-transistor type or photodiode type (such a photodiode being for instance diagrammatically illustrated at 20 in FIG. 6, associated with a battery 4, a

transistor 5, a relay 7, resistor 21-24, and thermal compensation thermistors 25 and 27).

The energizing of motor 2 might be controlled by the photoelectric cell that is used, whatever be its type, through any suitable means, whether or not said means comprise transistors and/or relays (for instance, in the two embodiments illustrated by FIGS. 7 and 8, control of relay 7 depends directly upon the variations of resistance of photoconductive cell 1 without passing through v the intermediate of a transistor).

In the embodiment illustrated by FIGS. 9 and the eyes 28 of the doll are connected together by a transverse member 29 rigid with a counterweight 30 and the assembly of said elements 28, 29 and 30 is pivoted about a spindle 31 carried by the head 32 of the doll and extendring parallel to a line passing through the centers of the eyes.

It will be readily understood that, with such an arrangement, the dolls eyes open when the head thereof is vertical (FIG. 9) and on the contrary close when this head is inclined (FIG. 10).

.by a spring 39 against contacts 33 and connecting them together electrically as long as the dolls eyes remain at least partly open.

Plate 35 carries an end projection 36 adapted to be displaced by transverse member 29 when eyes 28 approach closed position, so that said plate swings about one of the contacts 33 and moves away from the other one, thus opening the electric circuit which controls the cry simulating means (FIG. 10).

On the contrary when the dolls eyes reopen, transverse member 29 releases extension 36 and plate 35 is again applied by spring 39 against fixed contact 33, so that crying is resumed.

This gives the impression that the doll ceases to cry when going to sleep and cries again as soon as she awakes.

In the embodiment illustrated in the drawings, plate 35 carries a second extension 37 disposed opposite a hole 38 provided in the dolls mouth so that the opening of the switch above described and therefore the stopping of the cries, can also be produced by inserting a nipple into hole 38.

It is particularly advantageous to have the operation of a crying control switch produced by the closing of the dolls eyes when said eyes close only gradually due to the doll being handled or rocked, as described in my United States patent application Ser. No. 370,447 for Improvements in Sleeping Dolls filed on May 27, 1964.

In a general manner, while the above description discloses practical and efiicient embodiments of the present invention, said invention is not limited thereto as changes may be made in the arrangement, disposition and form of the components without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

It should be understood that the word doll which appears in the following claims should not be limited to toys representing a human being but is intended to encompass toys representing also other living beings.

What I claim is:

1. A toy comprising, in combination, a doll body, a photoelectric cell carried by the toy in such a position on said doll body normally covered by the clothes of said doll that it can be irradiated by light striking said toy, an electric transducer carried by said toy on the inside thereof, means carried by said toy and operatively connected with said cell for energizing said transducer in photoelectric cell carried by the toy in such a position on said doll body normally covered by the clothes of said doll that it can be irradiated by light striking said toy, an

electric transducer carried by said toy on the inside thereof, means carried by said toy and operatively connected with said cell for energizing said transducer in response to a given irradiation of said cell by light, and means operative by said transducer for emitting sound when said transducer is operating.

3. A toy according to claim 1 wherein said photoelectric cell is a photoconductive cell.

4. A' toy comprising, in combination, a doll body, a photoelectric cell carried by the toy in such a position thereon that it can be irradiated by light striking said toy, an electric transducer carried by said toy on the inside thereof operatively connected to said cell, a transistor carried by said toy, a battery carried by said toy operasaid transistor, said transistor being connected with said cell so that its conductance depends upon the irradiation of said cell, electromagnetic relay means carried by said toy connected with the input of said transistor and adapted to start the operation of said transducer when said transistor is conductive and only in this case, and means operative by said transducer for emitting sounds when said transducer is operating.

5. A toy according to claim 4 in which said means operative by said transducer for emitting sounds, when said transducer is operating, include a crank driven by said transducer and at least one bellows operatively connected with said crank so as to be alternate-1y expanded and compressed by the rotation of said crank and a vibrating reed for emitting sounds in response to the movements of said bellows.

6. A toy according to claim 4 in which said means operative by said transducer for emitting sounds, when said transducer is operating, include a crank driven by said transducer and at least one bellows operatively connected with said crank, so as to be alternately expanded and compressed by the rotation of said crank, and two vibrating reeds for emitting sounds in response to the movements of said bellows mounted so that one of them vibrates when said bellows is expanded whereas the other vibrates when said bellows is compressed.

7. A toy according to claim 4 in which said means operative by said transducer for emitting sounds, when said transducer is operating, include a casing journalvled in said toy and driven by said transducer, vibrating reeds in said casing and counterweight means movable in said casing and operatively connected to said reeds for operating them when said casing is rotated.

8. A toy comprising in combination, a doll body, movable opaque cover means normally shielding a portion of said body against the action of light rays, a photoelectric cell carried by said portion of said body, an electric transducer carried by said toy on the inside thereof, means carried by said toy and operatively connected with said cell for energizing said transducer in response to a given irradiation of said cell by light rays when said opaque cover means are moved to uncover said photoelectric cell, and means operative by said transducer for producing a signal when said transducer is operating.

9. A toy according to claim 8 wherein said photoelectric cell is positioned in the eyes of said doll.

10. A toy according to claim 8 wherein said photoelectric cell is positioned on the chest of said doll.

11. A toy according to claim 8 which further comprises switch means for deactivating said means operatively connected with said cell for energizing said transducer, said switch means being operative by the introduction of an element in the dolls mouth.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,920,027 7/1933 Wilhelm 46232 2,301,367 11/1942 Cahusac et a1 340273 2,668,284 2/1954 Mapes 340-273 3,150,461 9/1964 Grist 46232 3,159,942 12/1964 Fiske 46232 3,160,984 12/1964 Ryan 46-232 3,162,980 12/1964 Hellman 46232 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

L. J. BOVASSO, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1920027 *May 1, 1931Jul 25, 1933Robert WilhelmFigure
US2301367 *Mar 19, 1940Nov 10, 1942C O Two Fire Equipment CoSmoke detector and signal
US2668284 *Feb 28, 1950Feb 2, 1954Specialties Dev CorpApparatus for detecting suspended matter in fluids
US3150461 *Nov 25, 1960Sep 29, 1964Grist Franklin JamesToy sounding space helmet
US3159942 *Jul 31, 1961Dec 8, 1964Irving FiskeTalkback or echo doll and apparatus
US3160984 *Apr 22, 1964Dec 15, 1964Ryan John WMotor simulating sounding toy
US3162980 *Jul 6, 1961Dec 29, 1964Hellman Werner FTalking doll and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3490170 *Dec 30, 1966Jan 20, 1970Wolf TobinSounding wetting doll
US3514899 *Apr 26, 1968Jun 2, 1970Topper CorpDoll having electrical action-producing mechanism responsive to actuators on separate articles
US4314423 *Jul 9, 1979Feb 9, 1982Lipsitz Barry RSound producing toy
US4479329 *Sep 30, 1981Oct 30, 1984Jacob FradenToy including motion-detecting means for activating same
US4659919 *Feb 14, 1986Apr 21, 1987Price William EOptical sensing circuit for audio activation of toys
US4675519 *Jan 31, 1986Jun 23, 1987Price William EToy having optically actuated sound generator
US4687457 *Aug 26, 1985Aug 18, 1987Axlon, Inc.Hand-held puppet with pseudo-voice generation
US4717363 *Jul 29, 1986Jan 5, 1988Ets Anselme S.A.Dolls or similar toys
US4802879 *May 5, 1986Feb 7, 1989Tiger Electronics, Inc.Action figure toy with graphics display
US4874343 *Oct 23, 1987Oct 17, 1989Mattel, Inc.Toy detection and signaling circuit
US4964837 *Feb 16, 1989Oct 23, 1990Collier Harry BRadio controlled model vehicle having coordinated sound effects system
US5158492 *Apr 15, 1991Oct 27, 1992Elliott A. RudellLight activated doll
US5195920 *Oct 18, 1990Mar 23, 1993Collier Harry BRadio controlled model vehicle having coordinated sound effects system
US5501627 *Nov 8, 1994Mar 26, 1996Ekstein; PennyChildren's toy with peek-a-boo activation
EP0240591A2 *Apr 23, 1986Oct 14, 1987ORIGIN Co., Ltd.Means for generating audio-frequency
EP0620032A1 *Mar 17, 1993Oct 19, 1994CREATION & DISTRIBUTION LIMITEDDolls
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/191, 446/175, 446/197
International ClassificationA63H3/28, A63H3/33, A63H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/28
European ClassificationA63H3/28