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Publication numberUS3274804 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1966
Filing dateMay 22, 1964
Priority dateMay 22, 1964
Publication numberUS 3274804 A, US 3274804A, US-A-3274804, US3274804 A, US3274804A
InventorsKeever James D, Thorneburg James L, Thorneburg Lewis L
Original AssigneeThorneburg Hosiery Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Footlet type sock and method
US 3274804 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 27, 1966 J. 1.. THORNEBURG ET AL 3,

FOOTLET TYPE $00K AND METHOD Filed May 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 JLa MW ,IJMM

ATTORNEYS Sept. 27, 19 J. THORNEBURG ET AL 3,274,304

FOOTLET TYPE 500K AND METHOD 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 22, 1964 S G S mm? m NUUE R .WBBV o N H mm A 00K m HH 1 b M4 LL M S E FEM w WW JLM W B United States Patent O 3,274,804 FOOTLET TYPE SOCK AND METHOD James L. Thorneburg, Lewis L. Thorneburg, and James D. Keever, all of Statesville, N.C., assignors to Thorneburg Hosiery Mills, Inc., Statesville, N.C., a corporation of North Carolina Filed May 22, 1964, Ser. No. 369,438 15 Claims. (Cl. 66-171) This invention relates to a sock of the footlet type which is adapted to be worn inside of a shoe and to be substantially covered thereby. More particularly, the present footlet sock is adapted to be worn with low-cut shoes, such as those normally Worn by Women golfers, and the sock is provided with a support tab that is adapted to roll upon itself and engage the upper rear portion of the shoe to prevent the rear portion of the sock from sliding down into the shoe.

There are many different kinds of footlet type socks presently available that are adapted to be worn inside of the shoe and to be substantially covered thereby. One type requires that the material be cut or trimmed to form the foot receiving opening and then the cut edge is bound to prevent raveling while an elastic band is secured to the opening to permit stretchability and to attempt to prevent the footlet from sliding down into the shoe. Other types of footlets have been knit by hand with cuffs that fold down over the top of the shoe to prevent the sock from slipping down into the shoe, however, the high cost of hand-knit footlets has prohibited their widespread use. Also, short-top socks have been knit on circular hosiery knitting machines and sold as a footlet type sock to be worn and substantially covered by the shoe, however, these prior footlets tend to work down into the shoe when worn.

With the foregoing in mind, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a footlet sock that can be economically manufactured on a circular hosiery knitting machine and which has a stretchable upper selvage edge and a heel support tab that is adapted to roll upon itself to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the heel of the shoe.

It is another object ofthe present invention to provide a footlet sock of the type described in which terry loops are provided in selected portions to provide added comfort to the wearer.

It is a more specific object of the present invention to provide a footlet type sock of the type described wherein the stretchable upper selvage edge includes a plurality of rounds of an elastic strand inlaid in the initial stitch loops of the knit fabric surrounding the foot receiving opening and wherein the rounds of elastic serve to roll the fabric down upon itself around the rear of the heel to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding down into the shoe and to also serve to roll the fabric upon itself in an area extending across the upper front part of the footlet to prevent direct engagement of the rounds of elastic yarn with the top of the foot.

Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a foot with a lowcut shoe thereon and showing one form of footlet sock on the foot and substantially covered by the shoe with the front and rear upper edge portions rolled down;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 2-2 in FIGURE 1 and illustrating how the support tab at the rear portion of the sock rolls down upon itself and over the upper rear edge of the heel portion of the shoe to "ice prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe;

FIGURE 3 is a side elevation of the footlet sock, removed from the foot and in flattened condition, with the portions at the front and rear of the foot receiving opening rolled down;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of the portion of the footlet sock surrounding the foot receiving opening with the front and rear portions rolled down;

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIGURE 4 but showing the heel support tab and front portion of the selvage edge unrolled and held in straight condition, for illustrative purposes;

FIGURE 6 is a schematic view of the inside rear portion of the footlet sock as it would appear if slit down the top of the foot and along the gore lines of the heel pocket;

FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 5 but showing a second form of footlet sock wherein the partial courses of the heel support tab are progressively varied in length; and

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 but schematically illustrating the second form of footlet sock.

One preferred form of footlet sock is shown in FIG- URES 1-6 and, as shown in FIGURE 1, the footlet sock is adapted to be substantially covered by a low-cut shoe S so that only the small portion surrounding the foot receiving opening is exposed. In the drawings, the outside of the footlet is lined to show the direction in which the wales extend and the inside of the footlet is lined to show the direction in which the courses extend.

The sock includes a foot portion (FIGURE 3) having a toe pocket 10, a heel pocket 11 and a seamless tubular portion connecting the toe and heel pockets. The lower half of the seamless tubular portion defines a sole portion indicated at 12 and the upper half defines an instep portion indicated at 13. The toe of the footlet is closed in any suitable manner, such as by a looping or sewing operation along the line 14. The footlet also includes a narrow ankle portion 15 that extends around the upper portion of the footlet and located between the dash-dot lines 16, 17 of FIGURE 5.

A support tab, broadly indicated at T, extends substantially halfway around the rear portion of the footlet and is positioned above the heel pocket 11. As best shown in FIGURE 5, a plurality of rounds of an elastic strand 18 are in'laid in and encircled by stitch loops 20 of that portion of the upper course of the angle portion 15 which extends above the instep portion 13. The rounds of elastic strand 18 are also inlaid in and encircled by stitch loops 21 'of the uppermost partial course of the support tab T.

It is to be understood that the support tab T will not normally stand up, as shown in FIGURE 5, since the rounds of elastic strand 18 contract within the encircling stitch loops 20, 21 of the body yarn. Thus, the forwardmost ends of the support tab T are drawn down substantially level with the dash-dot line 16 (FIGURE 5) by the elastic strands 18 and cause the tab T to roll downwardly upon itself, as best shown in FIGURE 2, and over the upper edge of the heel portion of the shoe S to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe. The contracting of the inlaid rounds of elastic strand 1% also cause the medial portion of the upper edge of the complete courses -15 to roll outwardly and upon itselfacross the instep, as shown in FIGURES 1, 3 and 4 so that the elastic strands 18 are cushioned by a layer of fabric and do not come into direct contact with the top of the foot of the wearer.

In order to provide additional comfort and to enhance the appearance of the footlet, certain portions of the footlet are preferably provided with terry loops L which may be formed in the conventional manner by drawing the terry yarn over the nibs of the sinkers while the body yarn stitch loops are drawn over the regular throat position of the sinkers. In the form of footlet shown in FIGURES 1-6, the terry loops L are formed on the inner surface of the support tab T, in an area of the complete courses of the ankle portion 15 above the instep 13, and in the inner surface of the foot, including the heel pocket 11, the sole 12 and the toe 10.

The footlet is preferably knit on a circular hosiery knitting machine which is capable of knitting with both rotary and reciprocatory motion of the needle cylinder. FIGURE 6 schematically illustrates the manner in which the footlet is knit and will be referred to in describing the method of knitting this type of footlet sock. To begin the knitting of the footlet, the elastic strand 18 is alternately fed in front of and behind the needles of the knitting machine without knitting for 10 to 12 revolutions of the needle cylinder. Thus, these 10 or 12 rounds of elastic strands, preferably a covered rubber yarn, are held on the needles, behind alternate needles and in front of intervening needles.

The needle cylinder then begins to reciprocate and that half of the needles which are to knit the top or instep 13 of the footlet are switched to an idle level While the other half of the needles which are to knit the support tab T, remain at an active level. As the needle cylinder is reciprocated the body yarn is fed to the active needles and as the stitch loops 2-1 of the first partial course are formed, the rounds of elastic strand 18 are shed from these needles and the body yarn stitch loops 2.1 are formed around and encircle the rounds of elastic strand *1-8. The rounds of elastic strand 18 still remain held by the inactive needles while the SUPPOlIlI tab T is being knit.

With continued reciprocation of the needle cylinder, a partial course is knit on all of the active needles with each swing of the needle cylinder to form the desired height to the support ta-b T. On an 84 needle machine, it has been found that 16 partial courses are sufiicient to provide the desired height, however, it is to be undetrstood that this number may be varied. During the knitting of the partial courses of the support tab T, the body and terry yarns are both fed to the needles and the body yarn stitch loops are formed over the usual stitch drawing edges at the throats of the sinkers while the terry loops L are formed over the nibs of the sinkers.

The machine then again switches to rotate the needle cylinder and the complete courses in the ankle portion 15 are formed. As the first complete course is formed, along the dash-dot line 16 in FIGURES and 6, the instep needles (having been at the inactive level during the knitting of the support tab T) are switched to active level to pick up and knit the body yarn so that the rounds of elastic strand '18 are shed from these needles and the body yarn stitch loops 20 are formed around and encircle the rounds of elastic strand 18. During the knitting of the complete coures of the ankle portion 15, the sinkers adjacent those needles which knit a medial section at the firont of the foot receiving opening are moved inwardly between the needles at an earlier stage at the knitting station to form a section of terry loops L. It has been found that 8 complete courses is sufiicient for the ankle portion 15.

Upon completion of the knitting of the ankle portion 15, along the dash-dot line 17, the machine is again switched to recip'rocatory motion and the instep needles are switched to an inactive level. The heel pocket 11 is then knit with reciprocation of the needle cylinder, be-

ginning on approximately half of the needles and gradually reducing the number of needles knitting, in successive partial courses in a narrowing operation to form the narrowed gusset, indicated at 11a in FIGURE 6. It is also preferred that terry loops L be formed during the knitting of the heel pocket 11.

The narrowing operation is followed by a widening operation in which the number of needles knitting in suc ceeding partial courses is gradually increased to form the widened gusset, indicated at 11b in FIGURE 6. As the needles are gradually brought back into active level, the endmost stitch loops of the narrowed gusset 11a are joined to the endmost stitch loops of the narrowed gusset 11b along the gore line indicated at 24 in FIGURES 3, 4 and 5. A few additional partial widened courses are then formed and the endmost stitch loops are joined to the stitch loops of the last complete course of the ankle portion 15, along a suture line 25, that extends along the dash-dot line 17 in FIGURE 5.

All of the needles are then switched to active level as the needle cylinder again rotates to knit the seamless tubular foot portion of complete courses. During the circular knitting of the sole and instep portions 12 and 13, the sinkers are controlled to form terry loops L in the sole portion 12, extending from the dotted line 26 in FIGURE 3 and beneath the foot to a similar line on the opposite side. After the desired length of foot is knit, the toe pocket 10 is knit with reciprocation of the needle cylinder, preferably with terry loops on the inside. The narrowed and widened gussets of the toe are joined together along gore lines at opposite sides, as indicated at 27 in FIGURE 3. After the toe is competed, the needle cylinder is again rotated and a few complete courses, usually referred to as loopers rounds, are formed. These loopers rounds are cut away during the looping or sewing operation to close the toe along the line 14 in FIGURE 3.

The modified form of footlet shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 is of the same basic construction as the first form of footlet shown in FIG-URES 1-6 and corresponding parts will bear the same reference characters with the prime notation added. In the footlet shown in FIGURE 7, the partial courses of the support tab T are fashioned or varied in length so that opposite ends of the support tab T are tapered. The tapered ends of the support tab T may be formed by .a narrowing and/or Widening of the partial courses of the support tab T.

In the rfootlet of FIGURE 7, the initial stitch loops 21' of the first partial course of the tab T surround or encircle the inlaid elastic strands 18' around the rear portion of the foot receiving opening and succeeding partial courses of the tab T are progressively decreased in length down to the dash-dot line 16, where the complete courses of the ankle portion v15 begin. As schematically shown in FIG- URE 8, the decreasing length of the partial courses of the tab T forms a narrowed section having terry loops L on the inner face. As the support tab T is formed, the endmost stitch loops of the partial courses in the narrowed section are held on the idled needles until the first full course of the angle portion 15' is formed. As this first full course of the ankle portion 15' is formed, the idled needles are all brought back to active level so that the endmost stitch loops of the narrowed partial courses of the tab T are joined to the stitch loops of the first partial course to draw the opposite tapered ends of the support tab T down to the level of the first complete course of the ankle portion 15.

In this modified form of footlet, it is also preferred that two separate sections of terry loops L be formed during the knitting of the complete courses of the ankle portion 15. One section of terry loops L is formed across the instep and the other section is formed in a medial portion at the rear and beneath the tab T to cushion and further pfiotegt the heel against the upper edge of the heel of the s oe The heel pocket :11 of the footlet shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 is formed in a slightly dififerent manner from the heel pocket of the first form of footlet. In the heel pocket 11, the narrowed gusset 11a and the widened gusset 11b are the same and they are joined together along single gore lines 24 on each side of the footlet, only one being shown in FIGURE 7. The sole and instep portions 12', and the toe are knit in the same manner as the corresponding parts of the first form of footlet.

Thus, in both forms of footlet, the rounds of elastic strand are inlaid in the stitch loops of the first partial course of the support tab as well as in the stitch loops of that portion of the first circular course of the ankle portion which extends around the front and top of the foot. The inlaid rounds of elastic strand provide an elastic sel- Ivage edge or make-up which defines the opening in the footlet sock that is adapted to receive the foot of the wearer. The footlets can be economically knit on conventional circular hosiery knitting machinery with very little modification and they require no sewing or further finishing around the foot opening. The footlets are thus automatically completed on the knitting machine, except for closing the toe pocket by forming a looper line or seaming. The contracted rounds of elastic strand in the selvage upper edge of the footlet cause the material to roll down upon itself at the rear and front portions of the opening to form attractive rolls with the terry loops on the outside. The contracted rounds of elastic strand also hold the support tab in this downwardly rolled condition to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from working down into the shoe.

Attractive patterns can be formed by using body and/or terry yarns of different color to knit the support tab T and other portions of the footlet. It is to be understood that the terry loops can be provided in any desired portion of the footlet and any desired type of heel and/ or toe pocket may be knit. The length and height of the support tab may be varied substantially from that shown, as well as the number of complete courses formed in the ankle portion.

In the drawings and specification there have been set forth preferred embodiments of the invention and, although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only, and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims.

We claim:

1. A knit footlet type sock adapted to be Worn inside of a low-cut shoe and to be substantially covered thereby, said footlet sock comprising (a) a foot portion including a toe portion, a heel embracing portion, and a seamless tubular portion connecting said toe and heel portions, the lower half of said seamless tubular portion defining a sole portion and the upper half defining an instep portion,

(b) an ankle portion comprising a few complete courses connected to said instep portion and said heel embracing portion and extending upwardly therefrom,

(c) a support tab connected atone end to the portion of the upper course of the ankle portion positioned above said heel embracing portion, said support tab comprising a plurality of partial courses, and

(d) a plurality of rounds of an elastic strand inlaid in the stitch loops of the portion of the upper course of the ankle portion positioned above said instep portion, said rounds of elastic strand also being inlaid in the stitch loops of the terminal partial course of said support tab and forming an elastic selvage edge defining an opening in said footlet sock adapted to receive the foot of the wearer therethrough, sad elastic selvage edge serving to roll said support tab down upon itself and over the upper edge of the heel portion of the shoe to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe.

2. A footlet type sock according to claim 1 wherein said partial courses of said support tab are each the same length.

3. A footlet type sock according to claim 1 wherein said partial courses of said support tab successively vary in length.

4. A footlet type sock according to claim 2 wherein said partial courses of said support tab extend substantially half the distance around the foot receiving opening.

5. A footlet type sock according to claim 3 wherein said partial courses of said support tab progressively decrease in length from said terminal partial course to said upper course of said ankle portion, and wherein the endmost stitch loops of said palrtial courses are connected to the stitch loops of said upper course of said angle portion.

6. A knit footlet type sock adapted to be worn inside of a low-cut shoe and to be substantially covered thereby, said footlet sock comprising (a) a foot portion including a toe pocket, a heel pocket, and a seamless tubular portion connecting said toe and heel pockets, the lower half of said seamless tubular portion defining a sole portion and the upper half defining an instep portion,

(b) an angle portion comprising a few complete courses connected to said instep portion and said heel pocket and extending upwardly therefrom,

(c) a support tab connected at one end to the portion of the upper course of the ankle portion positioned above said heel pocket, said support tab comprising a plurality of partial courses of equal length, said partial courses extending substantially half the distance around the said upper course of said ankle portion,

(d) terry loops projecting from the inner face of said support tab, and

(e) a plurality of rounds of an elastic strand inlaid in the stitch loops of the portion of the upper course of the ankle portion positioned above said instep portion, said rounds of elastic strand also being inlaid in the stitch loops of the terminal partial course of said support tab and forming an elastic selvage edge defining an opening in said footlet sock adapted to receive the foot of the wearer therethrough, said elastic selvage edge serving to roll said support tab outwardly and down upon itself to expose said terry loops over the upper edge of the heel portion of the shoe and to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe.

7. A footlet type sock according to claim 6 wherein terry loops are provided on the inner face of the portion of said ankle portion opposite said support tab, and wherein said elastic selvage edge also serves to roll the upper edge of the instep portion of said ankle portion outwardly upon itself to expose said terry loops and to provide a cushion of fabric between the rounds of elastic strand and the instep of the wearer..

8. A knit footlet type sock adapted to be worn inside of a low-cut shoe and to 'be substantially covered thereby, said footlet sock comprising (a) a foot portion including a toe pocket, 2. heel pocket, and a seamless tubular portion connecting said toe and heel pockets, the lower half of said seamless tubular portion defining a sole portion and the upper half defining an instep portion,

(b) an ankle portion comprising a few completed courses connected to said instep portion and said heel pocket and extending upwardly therefrom,

(c) a support tab connected at one end to the portion of the upper course of the ankle portion positioned above said heel pocket, said support tab comprising a plurality of partial courses of progressively increasing length from said upper course of said ankle portion to the terminal partial course at the upper end of said support tab, said terminal partial course extending substantially half the distance around said upper course of said ankle portion, and the endmost stitch loops of said partial courses being connected to the stitch loops of said upper course of said ankle portion,

(d) terry loops projecting from the inner face of said support tab, and

(e) a plurality of rounds of an elastic strand inlaid in the stitch loops of the portion of the upper course of the ankle portion positioned above said instep portion, said rounds of elastic strand also being inlaid in the stitch loops of said terminal partial course of said support tab and forming an elastic selvage edge defining an opening in said f-ootlet sock adapted to receive the foot of the wearer therethrough, said elastic selvage edge serving to roll said support tab outwardly and down upon itself to expose said terry loops over the upper edge of the heel portion of the shoe and to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe.

9. A footlet type sock according to claim 8 wherein terry loops are provided on the inner face of the portion of said ankle portion opposite said support tab, and wherein said elastic selvage edge also serves to roll the upper edge of the instep portion of said ankle portion outwardly upon itself to expose said terry loops and to provide a cushion of fabric between the rounds of elastic strand and the instep of the wearer.

10. A method of forming a footlet type sock adapted to be worn inside of a low-cut shoe and to be substantially covered thereby, said footlet sock including a support ta-b adapted to roll down upon itself and over the upper edge of the heel portion of the shoe to prevent the rear portion of the footlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe, asid method comprising the steps of (a) forming a plurality of rounds of an elastic strand,

(b) knitting an initial partial course with the stitch loops encircling the rounds of elastic strand,

(c) knitting a plurality of partial courses to form the support tab,

((1) knitting an initial complete course with the stich loops in 'one section thereof being connected to the stitch loops of the last partial course of the support tab and stitch loops opposite said one section encircling the rounds of elastic strand,

(e) knitting a few additional complete courses to form an ankle portion,

(f) knitting fashioned partial courses and forming a heel pocket while connecting the stitch loops of the first partial course of the heel pocket to the stitch loops of a portion of the last course of the ankle portion positioned beneath the support tab,

(g) knitting a plurality of complete courses to form a tubular foot portion connected at one end to the last partial course of the heel pocketand to the stitch loops in that portion of the last course of the ankle portion opposite said one section, and

(h) knitting fashioned partial courses and forming a toe pocket connected to the other end of said tubular foot portion.

11. A method according to claim 10 wherein each of the partial courses formed in steps (b) and (c) are knit of the same length.

12. A method according to claim 10 wherein the partial courses formed in steps (b) and (c) are progressively decreased in length.

13. A method of forming a footlet type sock on a circular knitting machine having a needle cylinder with needles supported for independent movement therein and means for selectively rotating and reciprocating the needle. cylinder, the footlet type sock being adapted to be worn inside of a low-cut shoe and to be substantially covered thereby, said footlet sock including a support tab adapted to roll down upon itself and over the upper edge of theheel portion of the shoe to prevent the rear portion of the fo'otlet from sliding downwardly into the shoe, said. method comprising the steps of (a) rotating the needle cylinder while inlaying several rounds of an elastic strand alternately in front of and behind the needles,

(b) reciprocating the needle cylinder while 1) knitting an initial partial course on a group of adjacent needles comprising substantially half the needles while forming stitch loops encircling the rounds of elastic strand, and

(2) knitting a plurality of addition-a1 partial courses on said group of needles to complete the support tab,

(3) while continuing to hold the rounds of elastic strand on the remaining needles,

(0) rotating the needle cylinder while (1) knitting an initial complete course on all the needles while connecting the stitch loops formed on said group of needles to the stitch loops of the last partial course of the support tab and forming stitch loops on the remaining needles encircling the rounds of elastic strand, and

(2) knitting additional complete courses to form an ankle portion,

(d) reciprocating the needle cylinder and forming a heel pocket on said group of needles by knitting fashioned partial courses,

(e) rotating the needle cylinder and forming a tubular foot portion on all the needles, and

(f) reciprocating the needle cylinder and forming a toe pocket on substantially half of the needles by knitting fashioned partial courses.

14. A method according to claim 13 wherein each of the partial courses formed in the support tab are knit of the same length.

15. A method according to claim 13 wherein the partial courses formed in the support tab are progressively decreased in length.

References (Iited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,936,064 11/1933 Mills.

2,001,293 5/1935 Wilson 66-171 2,183,862 12/1939 Davis 66-172 2,256,690 9/1941 Smith 66-172 2,284,454 6/1942 Smith 66-194 2,623,374 12/1952 Hinchman 66-171 X 2,721,463 10/1955 Tuberty 66-173 2,800,782 7/1957 Bridges 66-194 X 2,904,980 9/1959 Stinson 66-171 3,130,566 4/1964 Chesebro 66-171 3,146,468 9/1964 McDonald 2-239 MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.

W. C. REYNOLDS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3503077 *Apr 22, 1968Mar 31, 1970Russell Hosiery Mills IncSlipper
US3975929 *Mar 12, 1975Aug 24, 1976Alba-Waldensian, IncorporatedThigh length anti-embolism stocking and method of knitting same
US3990115 *Jan 22, 1976Nov 9, 1976Renfro CorporationRoll top cuffless sock and method of forming same
US4169324 *Jan 31, 1978Oct 2, 1979Gibbs Don WSock and shoe and sock and shoe fastening means
US4255949 *Aug 16, 1979Mar 17, 1981Thorneburg James LAthletic socks with integrally knit arch cushion
US4263793 *Apr 2, 1979Apr 28, 1981Kayser-Roth Hosiery, Inc.Dress weight tube sock
US4282726 *Oct 31, 1979Aug 11, 1981Wayne Gossard, Inc.Anti-slip footlet sock
US4282727 *Nov 26, 1979Aug 11, 1981Brown Wooten Mills, Inc.Decorative footlet-type sock
US4304108 *Jul 30, 1979Dec 8, 1981Crescent Hosiery MillsSock with simulated overedge shell stitch and method
US4326393 *Oct 10, 1979Apr 27, 1982Brown Wooten Mills, Inc.Decorative footlet-type sock
US5428975 *Mar 28, 1994Jul 4, 1995Crescent Hosiery MillsDouble roll footee sock
US7076973 *Jan 28, 2005Jul 18, 2006Wigwam Mills, Inc.Method and apparatus for making a sock having a looped tab
US20050026539 *Aug 14, 2003Feb 3, 2005Sara Lee CorporationCircular knitted garments having bands with integrally knit cushion loops
US20140059891 *Jun 28, 2013Mar 6, 2014Chung-Kuang LinStructure of shoe
EP1654408A2 *Jul 26, 2004May 10, 2006Sara Lee CorporationCircular knitted garments having bands with integrally knit cushion loops
WO1997018722A1 *Nov 14, 1996May 29, 1997Throneburg James LFoot protector for use in combination with hosiery and method of making and using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/171, 66/85.00A, 66/194, 66/186, 66/46, 2/239, 66/172.00E
International ClassificationA41B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41B11/00
European ClassificationA41B11/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 17, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: THORNEBURG, JAMES L. P.O. BOX 503, 629 NORTH RACE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:THORNEBURG HOSIERY CO., INC. A NC CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004141/0242
Effective date: 19830427