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Publication numberUS3275322 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1966
Filing dateApr 14, 1964
Priority dateApr 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3275322 A, US 3275322A, US-A-3275322, US3275322 A, US3275322A
InventorsBurnside Walter M
Original AssigneeBurnside Walter M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Amusement device with changeable score control mechanism
US 3275322 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 27, 1966 w. M. BURNSIDE 3,

AMUSEMENT DEVICE WITH CHANGEABLE SCORE CONTROL MECHANISM Filed April 14. 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 37 5 Inventor WQH: er M Burns id e AMUSEMENT DEVICE WITH CHANGEABLE SCORE CONTROL MECHANISM Filed April 14. 1964 Se t. 27, 1966 w. M. BURNSIDE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 lllll nlllllln" W IHHIIHI' .uu'llml.

Inventor Walter M. Burnside 55 ifi w, NW8: @iok e Sept. 27, 1966 w. M. BURNSIDE AMUSEMENT DEVICE WITH CHANGEABLE SCORE CONTROL MECHANISM Filed April 14 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 5 wmwm i V- .m m

United States Patent 3,275,322 AMUSEMENT DEVICE WITH CHANGEABLE SCORE CONTROL MECHANISM Walter M. Burnside, 324 S. Orchard, Waukegan, Ill. Filed Apr. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 359,748 8 Claims. (Cl. 273119) This invention relates generally to amusement devices which require skill in rolling or otherwise propelling a ball or object along a game board surface to a preselected target.

It is a general object of the present invention to provide an improved amusement device requiring skill to operate.

It is another object of this invention to provide apparatus for use in an amusement device, wherein a player may attain a score which is dependent upon his skill in rolling a ball or otherwise propelling an object to a selected winner target.

It is still another object to provide apparatus of the foregoing character, wherein interest in the game is stimulated by providing means whereby the players score will be increased by a preselected multiple of a basic score when the player is successful in contacting his preselected target. Still another object is to provide apparatus of the foregoing character, wherein the apparatus includes means for automatically selecting the score multiplier according to chance.

A still further object is to provide apparatus of the foregoing character, which includes a control unit for automatically selecting one or more winner targets.

Another object of the invention is to provide apparatus of the foregoing type, which includes means for selecting the score multiplier prior to the selection of a winner target.

Still another object is to provide apparatus of the foregoing character, wherein the control unit includes means for actuating a score indicating mechanism.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying figures of the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an amusement device including apparatus embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of a control unit of the apparatus;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are electrical schematic diagrams of the apparatus;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 66 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 88 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 99 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 10 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 10--10 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 11 is an elevational view partially in section of a start lever assembly of the apparatus.

An amusement device including control apparatus embodying the invention may comprise a pin ball machine including a frame supported on the floor by a plurality of vertically extending legs 21. The frame forms a generally flat rectangular play field 22 having a plurality of numbered targets thereon. When the device is a pin ball type machine, the targets are holes 23. At the lower edge of the play field 22 where a player of the device stands, a shooting plunger apparatus 24 is provided which 3,275,322 Patented Sept. 27, 1966 ICC is adjustable in a plane substantially parallel to the playing field 22 so that a player of the device may aim and shoot a ball onto. the playing field in the direction of any one of the holes 23. The play field 22 slopes downwardly from the far edge of the play field toward the player, so that a ball propelled onto the play field will tend to roll back toward the player by gravity. In the form illustrated, two guides 26 are provided on the play field, which guide a ball rolling toward the player into the plunger apparatus 24 so that it may be once again propelled onto the play field. Also at the end of the device where the player stands is mounted a start lever assembly 27, also shown in FIG. 11 of the drawing, and to be described in greater detail hereinafter.

At the end of the device away from the player is a vertically disposed score panel 28. On the score panel are provided a series of numbers 29 which correspond to the numbers of the target holes 23 on the play field 22, and also a series of score multiplier numbers 31. The numbers 29 and 31 are associated with electric lights which normally are not energized but which may be energized as will be described later in order to light up certain of the numbers 29 and 31. Also on the score panel 28 is a score register 32 which indicates a players score through an opening in the score panel 28, as will also be described hereinafter.

Apparatus embodying certain of the novel concept of the invention can be mounted within the frame 20 behind the score panel 28 and underneath the play field 22, and includes a control unit 36, shown in FIGS. 2 to 10. The control unit 36 (as best shown in FIG. 2) comprises a frame including a flat base plate 37 and two spaced angles 38 and 39. The angles 38 and 39 can be secured as by welding to the base plate 37 and extend outwardly from the plate 37 in spaced planes which are substantially perpendicular to the plane of the base plate 37. A drive shaft 41 extends through a hole formed in each of the angles 38 and 39 and is rotatably mounted thereon. An electric motor 42 is secured to the angle 38 and is connected to rotate the drive shaft 41. Mounted on the drive shaft 41 between the two angles 38 and 39 are a timing assembly 43, a score register assembly 44 and a score selector assembly 45.

The timing assembly 43 comprises a brake disc 47 secured to the drive shaft 41 by a pin 47a, a timing index disc 48, with a slip or friction clutch disc 49 being secured to the index disc 48 facing disc 47, is rotatably mounted on the shaft 41 adjacent the brake disc 47. The timing assembly 43 further includes two cams 51 and 52 (FIGS. 5 and 6) which are held in spaced relationship by a spacer 53. The cams 51 and 52 are secured to the timing index disc 48 by screws 54 and rotate with the disc 48. The

cam 51 has a node or raised cam working surface 56 (FIG. 5 formed thereon, and the cam 52 has a raised cam working surface 57 (FIG. 6) formed thereon which extends through an arc of approximately 270.

- rotates the shaft 41, the clutch disc 49 tends to rotate the timing index disc 48 along with the brake disc 47. The timing index disc 48 is, however, normally prevented from rotating with the drive shaft 41 by a pivotally mounted brake pawl 63 (see FIG. 5) having a hook end portion 64 adapted to engage a notch 66 formed in the as outer periphery of the timing index disc 48. The brake pawl 63 is connected to and actuated by a release solenoid 67 mounted on a portion of the plate 37 of the frame of the control unit 36. A spring 68 is connected between the plunger 69 of the solenoid 67. The spring 68 normally urges the end portion 64 of the brake pawl 63 into engagement with the notch 66 and holds the disc 48 stationary. In addition, the other end 71 of the brake pawl 63 which is opposite the hook end portion 64 is positioned to close a normally open switch 72 (FIGS. 4 and when the release solenoid 67 is energized, as will be described hereinafter.

The score register assembly 44 comprises the brake disc 62 which is secured to the drive shaft 41 by a pin 77 and a score register index disc 78 which may be generally similar to the timing index disc 48 and is rotatably mounted on the shaft 41. A slip clutch 79 is again positioned between the brake disc 62 and the index disc 78 and secured to the disc 78. Thus, when the drive shaft 41 is rotated by the motor 42, the slip clutch 79 tends to rotate the score index disc 78 due to the pressure of another compression spring 81 which urges the two discs 62 and 78 together.

Also secured to the score index disc 78 and rotatably mounted as a unit on the drive shaft 41 are two cams 82 and 83, better shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, respectively. The two cams 82 and 83 are held in spaced apart relationship by a spacer 84 and are secured to the score index disc 78 by screws 86 and rotate with the disc 78.

A brake pawl 87 and a brake release solenoid 88 (shown schematically in FIG. 4) are also provided for the score register index disc 78 and can be similar to the pawl 63 and the solenoid 67 shown in FIG. 5. The pawl 87 is also positioned to close a normally open switch 89, shown in FIG. 4, when the release solenoid 88 is energized.

The cam 82 has a single node 91 (FIG. 7) which is adapted to momentarily close a normally open switch 92, shown in FIGS. 4 and 7, when the cam 82 is rotated. The cam 83 has six nodes 93 (FIG. 8) which are adapted to momentarily close a normally open switch 94 (FIGS. 4 and 8) upon rotation of the drive shaft 41. It will be apparent that when the drive shaft 41 is rotated, the switch 92 will be momentarily closed once for each revolution of the drive shaft 41 and the cam 82, and the switch 94 will be momentarily closed six times for each revolution of the shaft 41 and the cam 83.

The score selector assembly 45 comprises a brake disc 96 which is also secured to the drive shaft 41 by a pin 97. A compression spring 81 of the score register assembly 44 is positioned between the cam 83 and the brake disc 96. The score selector assembly 45 further comprises a wiper assembly disc 100 also shown in FIG. 10, which is rotatably mounted on the shaft 41. A slip clutch 99 is secured to the disc 100 and faces the disc 96. A compression spring 101 is positioned between the wiper assembly disc 100 and a pin 102 on the shaft 41 and urges the wiper assembly disc 100 toward the brake disc 96 and the clutch 99.

As shown in FIG. 10, the wiper assembly disc 100 has a plurality of teeth 103 formed in the entire outer periphery thereof. A brake pawl 104 (FIGS. 2 and is positioned adjacent the wiper assembly disc 100 and engages one of the teeth 103 and holds the disc 100 stationary even though the shaft 41 is rotated by the motor 42. The brake pawl 104 is actuated by a release solenoid 106 (shown schematically in FIG. 4) and releases the disc 100 in the same manner described in connection with the apparatus shown in FIG. 5.

The score selector assembly 45 further includes a score selector disc 107, shown in FIGS. 2 and 9, which is secured to the frame of the control unit 36 adjacent the disc 100 by the plurality of spaced mounting pins 108. The disc 107 is made of an electrical insulating material and has spaced electrically conductive rivets or contacts secured thereto which define three concentric rings 111,

4 112 and 113. In each ring 111, 112 and 113 there are, in the embodiment of the invention illustrated, a mini mum of nine rivets but preferably more than nine, which are spaced apart on equal angular distance. The rivets of the rings 112 to 113 extend outwardly from the lateral surface of the disc 107 toward the toothed disc 100, and are adapted to be engaged by four wipers 116, 117, 118 and 119 (shown schematically in FIG. 9) with the said wipers being fixedly secured to the toothed disc and being rotated with this disc 100. The outer ends of :the wipers 116 to 119 engage the rivets forming at least one of the rings 111 and 113 and the inner ends of the said wipers make a sliding electrical contact with one of two electrically conductive bands 121 and 122 which are secured to the disc 107. The wipers 116 to 118 are in continuous electrical contact with the band 121, and the wiper 119 is in continuous electrical contact with the band 122. The bands 121 and 122 and the rivets of the three rings 111 to 113 form part of the circuits shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 and will be further described hereinafter.

The disc 100, best shown in FIG. 10, preferably has the same number of teeth on its outer periphery as there are rivets in each of the rings 111 to 113. Further, the wipers 116 to 119 are mounted on the disc 100 such that each will make electrical contact with one of the rivets whenever the brake pawl 104 engages and holds the disc 107 stationary.

FIG. 11 shows the construction of the start level as sembly 27. This assembly comprises an elongated lever arm 126 which is pivotally mounted for movement in a vertical plane of the housing 20 on a pivot pin 127. One end of the lever 126 extends out of the housing 20 and forms an operating handle 128, and the other end of the lever 126 extends under the play field 22 :to each of the holes 23 and forms a ball ejector 129. Adjacent the pin 127, .a lug 131 is formed on the lever 126 and two spaced apart pins 132 are secured to the lug 131 and are positioned to engage a center flexible contact 133 of a start switch 134, also shown in FIG. 4. The switch 134 also has two stationary contacts 136 and 137, and an electrical connection is made between the two contacts 133 and 136 when the handle 128 is moved upwardly and an electrical connection is made between the contacts 133 and 137 when the handle 128 is moved downwardly. When the lever 126 is in its normal position, the portion of the lever 126 opposite from the handle 128 rests on a portion 135 of the housing 20.

Also shown in FIG. 11 are one of the holes 23 formed in the play field 22 and a hole or target switch 138, one such switch being provided for each of the holes 23. The switches 138, also shown in FIG. 3 are normally open, and each switch 138 has an arm 139 which extends underneath the associated hole 23 such that, when a ball drops into one of the holes 23, the switch 138 associated with that hole will be closed.

FIGS. 3 and 4 are schematic diagrams of the electrical circuit of the apparatus. The circuit includes a transformer 146 having a primary winding 147 and two secondary windings 148 and 149. The primary winding 147 is connected through a conventional on-oif switch 151 to a connector 152 which may, for example, be connectable to a common volt wall outlet.

The secondary winding 148 (FIG. 4) is connected through a fuse 156 to two lines 157 and 158. The contacts 133 and 137 of the start switch 134 are connected across the two lines 157 and 158 in series with the coil of a start relay 159 having a plurality of normally open switches 161, 162, 163 and 164 (FIG. 4.) The contacts 133 and 136 of the start switch 134 are also connected across the lines 157 and 158, but in series with the start relay switch 164 and the coil of the release solenoid 67 for the timing assembly 43. Connected in parallel with the coil of the release solenoid 67 is the coil of a score counter reset solenoid 166 which, when energized, resets to its starting position a score counter, which may be in the form of a stepping switch indicated by the numeral 167 in FIG. 3.

The motor 42 of the control unit 36 is connected across the lines 157 and 158 through the parallel connection of the three normally open switches 89, 72 and 161. The coil of the release solenoid 88 for the score register assembly 44 is connected across the lines 157 and 158 in series with the normally open switch 168 of a winner relay having a coil 169 in the circuit shown in FIG. 3. The coil of the release solenoid 106 of the score selector assembly 45 is connected across the two lines 157 and 158 in series with the parallel connection of the two normally. open switches 59 and 162. The coil of the start relay 159, in addition to being energizable through the contacts 133 and 137, may also be energized through the normally closed switch 163, which are connected in parallel with the contacts 133 and 137. The switch 92, which is actuated by the cam 82 of the score register assembly 44, is normally open and is connected across the two lines 157 and 158 in series with the coil of a score counter step-up solenoid 171, which also form part of the score counter stepping switch 167 shown in FIG. 3. The normally open switch 94, which may be closed by the cam 83 of the score register assembly 44, is connected across the two lines 157 and 158 in series with the coil of a score register step-up solenoid 172 which is connected to actuate the score register 32, shown in FIG. 1. Also connected across the two lines 157 and 158 is the series connection of a normally open reset push button reset switch 173 and the coil of a score register reset solenoid 174. The reset button 173 is positioned where it may be actuated by a player of the amusement device, as shown in FIG. 1. The solenoid 174 is also connected to the score register 32 and, when energized, resets the score register 32 to its starting position.

With regard to FIG. 3, the secondary winding 149 is connected through a fuse 181 to two lines 182 and 183. The wiper 118 of the score selector assembly 45 is connected to the line 182, and the rivets of the ring 112 are connected to the line 183 each through a light 184, The lights 184 are positioned behind the numbers 31 on the score panel 28, and it will be apparent that one of the lights 184 will be energized at a time, the energized light being the one associated with the rivet currently being engaged by the wiper 118, and that as the wiper 118 sweeps across the rivets of the ring 112, the lights 184 will be energized successively.

The two wipers 116 and 117 are also electrically connected to the line 182, and the rivets of the ring 113 are connected to the other line 183 through another series of lights 186. The lights 186 are positioned behind the numbers 29 on the score panel 28 and, in the embodiment shown, two'of the lights 186 may be energized at a time. As the wipers 116 and 117 sweep across the rivets of the ring 113, the lights 186 may be lighted in pairs. As will be explained hereinafter, the connection between the rivets of the ring 113 and the lights 186 may be such that one or two of the lights 186 may be energized at a time and in a random order, as when there are more than nine rivets in the rings 111 to 113.

The target or hole switches 138 are all connected to a common line 187 and one of the switches 138 is connected to each of the conductors running from the lights 186 to the rivets of ring 113. The common conductor 187 leads to the wiper 119 which sweeps across the rivets of the ring 111. The rivets of the ring 111 are connected to the stationary contacts of the score counter stepping switch 167, and the movable contacts of the stepping switch 167 are connected in parallel to one side of the coil of the relay 169 being connected to the line 183. As shown in FIG. 3, the stepping switch 167 has an equal number of stationary and movable contacts, and the solenoid 171 (FIG. 4) causes all of the movable contacts to move one step to the right as seen in FIG. 3 each time it is energized, and energization of the solenoid 166 6. returns the movable contacts of the stepping switch 167 to its starting position, shown in FIG. 3.

In operation, the connector 152 is initially connected to a suitable power supply and the switch 151 is closed, thereby applying power to the circuits shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The player or operator then presses the handle 128 of the start lever assembly 27 downwardly. In the event a ball is in one of the holes 23, it will be ejected by the end 129 of the lever 126 and, simultaneously, an electrical connection will be made between the contacts 133 and 137 of the switch 134. The coil of the start relay 159 is then energized which closes the switches 161, 162, 163 and 164. With the switch 161 closed, the motor 42 is energized and the drive shaft 41 is caused to rotate. At the same time, closing of the switch 162 causes the coil of the release solenoid 106 of the score selector assembly 45 to be energized, with the result that the brake pawl 104 releases the disc and permits it to rotate. With rotation of the disc 100, the wipers 116 to 119 being wiping or sweeping across their associated rivets and the lights 184 and 186 begin flashing on and off. The wiper 119, of course, follows the movement of the wiper 118.

The player of the device then raises the handle 128 of the start lever assembly 27, which action establishes an electrical connection between the contacts 133 and 136 of the switch 134. The coil of the start relay 159 will continue to be energized, however, through the normally closed switch 58 and the now closed switch 163 of the start relay 159. In addition, since the switch 164 of the start relay 159 is closed at this time, the coil of the release solenoid 67 of the timing assembly 43 will be energized and the score counter reset coil 166 will be energized. Energization of the latter coil 166 causes the movable contacts of the stepping switch 167 to move to their starting positions, as previously explained. Energization of the release solenoid 67 causes the pawl 63 to release the timing index disc 48 and permits rotation of the two earns 51 and 52. At the same time, the disc 100 and the wipers 116 to 119 continue to rotate. Energization of the release solenoid 67 also closes the normally open switch 72 which is connected in series with them otor 42 to ensure continued energization of the motor 42.

It should be noted at this time that the disc 100 and the wipers 116 to 119 begin to rotate when the start lever handle is moved down and the timing index disc 48 and the cams 51 and 52 begin to rotate when the start lever handle is moved up. Since the time interval between the start of these operations vary, depending upon the speed at which the player of the game moves the handle, a predictable selection of the multiplier numbers 31 and Winner hole numbers 29 is prevented.

From FIG. 5 it will be noted that the node 56 is located relative to the notch 66 of the timing assembly 43 such that the node 56 will cause the switch 58 to momentarily open after approximately A of a revolution of the index disc 48, and that the working surface 57 of the cam 52 will cause the normally open switch 59 to close after approximately A revolution of the disc 48. Opening of the switch 58 causes deenergization of the start solenoid 159 and opening of the switches 161, 162, 163 and 164. The motor 42 continues to be energized through the switch 72, and the'release solenoid 106 of the score selector assembly 45 continues to be energized because switch 59 is closed by cam 52 simultaneously with the deenergization of the start solenoid 159. Opening the switch 164 causes deenergization of the release solenoid 67 for the timing assembly 43, but the brake pawl 63 rides on the outer surface of the disc 48 and will continue to do so until the hook end portion 64 of pawl 63 drops into notch 66 and thereafter prevents further rotation of the disc 48. The coil 166 is also deenergized but by this time the score counter stepping switch 167 has already been returned to M starting position.

At this point, the disc 100 and the wipers 116 to 119 are rotating and the cams 51 and 52 of the timing assembly 43 are rotating. i

After approximately revolution of the disc 48 and the cam 52 of the timing .assembly 43, the working surface 57 permits the switch 59 to open which results in deenergization of the coil for the release solenoid 106 for the score selector assembly 45. The pawl 104 of the assembly 45 thereupon engages the disc 100 and prevents further rotation of this disc 100, and the rivets of the rings 112 and 113 which are presently engaged by the wipers 116 to 118 connect electrical power to the particular lights 184 and 186 associated with the engaged rivets of rings 112 and 113. The energized light or lights 186 therefore indicate which holes 23 have been designated as winner holes and the energized light 184 indicates the integer by which the players score will be multiplied (i.e. score multiplier) in event the player is able to drop the ball into a winner hole. The motor 42 and the timing index disc 48 and the cams 51 and 52 of the timing assembly continue to rotate however until the pawl 63 drops into the notch 66 and prevents further rotation of the disc 48. This action also opens switch 72 which in turn causes deenergization of the drive motor 42. If desired, the score multiplier can be selected by a wiper assembly disc and contact ring of spaced rivets, generally similar to that of disc 100 with its wiper 118 and selector disc 107, but which are operated independently of assembly 45, so that hte score multiplier can be determined before or after the winner target hole 23 is selected. As in the arrangement illustrated, however, the score counter stepping switch 167 must be precisely coordinated with the score multiplier selector means.

The player, by operating the shooting plunger assembly 24, propels a ball onto the play field 22 toward one of the selected winner holes 23. If the player misses the winner hole and the ball drops into one of the other holes, play is terminated and can only be resumed by moving the handle of the start lever assembly 27 downwardly which begins the sequence of operations previously described.

If the player is able to roll the ball into one of the winner holes 23, the hole switch .138 associated with the winner hole 23 will be closed by the weight of the ball. Electrical connection is then made from the line 1182 (FIG. 3) through one of the wipers 1'16 and 117 and the rivet engaged by it, through the closed switch 138 to the conductor 187 and the wiper 119. The winner relay coil 169 is then energized through the stepping switch 167 and the wiper 1 19. Energization of the winner relay coil 169 closes the switch 168, in turn energizes the coil of the release solenoid 88 of the score register assembly 44. With this solenoid 88 energized, the disc 78 is released and permitted to rotate and movement of the pawl 87 closes switch 72 and energizes the motor 42. The disc 78 and the two cams 82 and 83 of the score register assembly 44 thereupon begin rotating, but the discs of the timing assembly 43 and score selector assembly 45 are held stationary by their associated brake pawls.

Rotation of the cam 83 causes the switch 94 to be momentarily closed each time it is engaged by one of the nodes 93 and, since in the embodiment of the invention illustrated, there are six nodes, the switch 94 will be momentarily closed six times for each revolution of the shaft 41 and the cam 83. Each time the switch 94 is closed, the coil 172 is momentarily energized. As previously stated, the coil I172 causes the score register 32 behind the score panel to advance the score indicated one step each time it is energize-d, with the result that the score will be increased six units for each revolution of the cam 83. The score register 32 may be in the form of a conventional stepwise rotating indicator having numbers attached to its outer periphery, the numbers being visible through the opening in the score panel, as shown in FIG. 1. The coil 172 advances this stepping indicator and the coil -174 when activated returns the stepping indicator to its starting position.

Simultaneously, for each revolution of the shaft 41 and the cam 82, the switch 92 is momentarilyclosed once by the node 91 and thereby momentarily energizes the coil 171. As stated earlier, the coil 171 is connected to advance the score counter stepping switch 167 one position to the right each time it is energized. With reference to FIG. 3, it will be apparent that in the position of the wiper 119 shown, after one revolution of-the shaft 41 the score register 32 will be increased six digits and then the movable contacts of the stepping switch I167 will be moved one position to the right; after a second revolution of the shaft 41, the score register 32 will be increased six more digits and the movable contacts of the switch 167 will be moved a second position to the right; etc. After four complete revolutions of the shaft 41, the score register will have been energized 24 times and the movable contacts of the setting switch 167 will have been moved four positions to the right. In the latter position there will no longer be a movable contact of the stepping switch 167 electrically connected to the rivet engaged by the wiper 119, and the winner relay 169 will be deenergized. This action opens switch 168 and deenergizes release solenoid 88 of the score register assembly 44 which in turn opens switch 89 and deenergizes the motor 42. The score register 32, of course, remains in its last energized position and indicates the players final score (i.e. twenty-four in the foregoing illustration). If he wishes he may retain this score and play another round and have subsequent plays added to this score, or he may press the score reset button 173 and cause the score register to be reset due to ener ization of the coil 174.

In the embodiment of the invention shown and described, the number of rivets in each ring 111 to 112 is shown as being equal to the number of holes 23 in the play field for ease of illustration. This is not necessary, however, and in fact, it is preferable that there be many more rivets in the ring 113 and that the rivets of the ring 113 be connected in a random manner to the lights 186 to make it difficult for a player to predict which of the lights 186 will be energized next. Also, some of the rivets of the ring 113 may be left unconnected from a light 186 so that, at times, only one :of the lights 186 will be energized at a time.

Further, it is not necessary that the number of multiplying integers representing the score multiplier be equal to the number of holes 23 and lights 186. The wiper 118 must in every instance be correlated electrically, if not mechanically, with the wiper 119 so that the lights 184 will correctly indicate the multiplying integer selected.

I claim:

1. In an amusement device which includes a generally flat play field having a plurality of targets thereon and an object which can be propelled onto a play field to contact one of said targets, a plurality of target switches associated with each of said targets and wherein one of said target switches is adapted to be activated when one .of said targets is contacted by one of said objects propelled on said play field, and a score register means operatively connected with said target switches and adapted to be activated when a target switch is closed and indicate a score value, the improvement comprising; means for selecting at least one winner target having a nominal score value, means for automatically selecting by chance a score value multiplying integer for increasing said nominal score value, and scorecounter means operatively associated with said score multiplier means and said target switch for actuating said score register means and indicating a score total which is a multiple of said score value.

2. Apparatus as in claim 1, wherein said means for selecting a score value multiplying integer selects said multiplying integer simultaneously with the selection of said winner target.

3. Apparatus as in claim 1, wherein said means for selecting a score value multiplying integer selects said multiplying integer before said winner target is selected.

4. Apparatus as in claim 1, wherein said winner target selector means and said multiplying integer selector means includes a generally fiat first member having a plurality of electrical contacts arranged thereon at circumferentially spaced positions, a multiple position switch the different positions of which represent different multiplying integers some of said contacts of said first member being connected to said target switches and other of said contacts being connected to said different position of said multiple position switch, and a second member having a plurality of wipers secured thereto and adapted to wipe across said contacts when said first and second members are rotated relative to each other, and means for preventing relative rotation of said first and second members with said wipers engaging certain of said contacts, the engaged contacts thereby determining the selection of a winner target and a multiplying integer.

5. An amusement device which comprises a generally flat play field having a plurality of targets thereon and an object which can be propelled onto the play field to contact one of said targets, a purality of target switches associated with each of said targets and wherein one of said target switches is adapted to be actuated when one of the targets with which it is associated is contacted by one of said objects propelled on said play field, and a score register means operatively connected with said target switches and adapted to be activated when a target switch is closed and indicate a score value, the improvement which comprises; means for selecting at least one Winner target having a nominal score value, a score multiplier selector means for selecting a score value multiplying integer for increasing said score value, and said score register means having a score counter means operatively associated with said score multiplier selector means and said winner target switch for registering a total score which is a selected multiple of the said nominal value, a frame for support-ing said score multiplier means and said score register means, a shaft rotatably mounted on said frame, an electric motor connected to rotate said shaft relative to said frame, a timing assembly including a timing index dis-c and a plurality of cams rotatable as a unit on said shaft, first electrically actuated means for controlling rotation of said timing index disc with said shaft, a plurality rof switches positioned to be actuated by said cams, and a score selector assembly includnig a wiper disc mounted for rotation on said shaft, second electrically actuated means for controlling rotation of said wiper disc with said shaft, a plurality of wipers mounted for rotation with said wiper disc, a generally flat member mounted on said frame adjacent said wiper disc, said member having a plurality of electrical contacts arranged thereon which are engageable by said wipers, said contacts being arranged in circular fashion and located at circumferentially spaced locations, said wiper disc and said second electrically actuated means adapted to hold said wiper disc at any one of a plurality of angularly offset positions, and said wipers adapted to engage said contact-s at said positions.

6. Apparatus as in claim 5, wherein said score register means includes another plurality of cams mounted for rotation as a unit on said shaft, a third electrically actuated means for controlling rotation of said latter plurality of cams, and another plurality of switches positioned to be actuated by said latter plurality of cams.

7. In an amusement device which includes a generally flat play field having a plurality of targets thereon and an object which can be propelled onto a play field to contact one of said targets, a plurality of target switches associated with each of said targets and wherein one of said target switches is adapted to be activated when one of said targets is contacted by one of said objects propelled on said play field, and a score register means operatively connected with said target switches and adapted to be activated when a target switch is closed and indicate a score value, the improvement comprising; means for selecting at least one winner target having a nominal score value, means for automatically selecting by choice a score value multiplying integer for increasing said nominal score value, and score counter means operatively associated with said score multiplier means and said target switch for actuating said score register means and indicating a score total which is a multiple of said score value, a multiple position switch having a plurality of first contacts and a plurality of second contacts, said first and second contacts being movable relative to each other and having a starting position, one contact of said first and second contacts being designated a unit contact, electrical step up means for shifting said relatively movable contacts one position away from said starting position each time it is energized, repeated energization of said step up means causing successive contacts starting with said unit contact to be left electrically isolated from the other contacts of said switch, all of the contacts of one of said first and second contacts being electrically connected, adjustable electrical wiper means adapted to make electrical connection with one contact of the other of said first and second contacts and having automatic means for adjusting the position of said electrical wiper means according to chance, an electrically actuated winner device adapted to be energized through said first and second contacts and said Wiper means, and first and second members both responsive to actuation of said winner device and both capable of cyclically repetitive operation, said first member being connected to control said electrical step up means for said multiple position switch and said second member being connected to control actuation of said score register, each cycle of said first member shifting said switch at least one position and each cycle of said second member actuating said score register at least once, whereby a final score on said score register will be indicative of the number of actuations of said register for each cycle of said second member multiplied by the number of contacts said wiper means is removed from said unit contact.

8. Apparatus as in claim 7 wherein said first and second members are rotatable cams.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,962,680 6/ 1934 Brumbelow 273-119 2,093,293 9/ 1937 Stoner et a1 273--121 2,595,048 4/ 1952 Bielicki 340 -323 2,864,619 12/1958 Burnside 273-121 2,872,193 2/ 1959 Hamilton 273-119 3,144,589 8/1964 McGee 317137 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

L. I. BOVASSO, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3384375 *Jan 4, 1966May 21, 1968Murray ZifferblattGame board with projectile receivers, selectively operated switches, and indicators
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/119.00A, 273/123.00R, 361/191, 273/138.2
International ClassificationA63F7/02, A63D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/027
European ClassificationA63F7/02P1